of November

5, 2002

Chair Robert Cherny called

the Academic Senate to order at 2:10 p.m.

Senate Members Present

Aaron, Eunice

Avila, Guadalupe

Bartscher, Patricia

Bernstein, Marian

Bernard-Powers,

Jane

Blando, John

Blomberg, Judith

Carrington, Christopher

Chen, Yu-Charn

Cherny, Robert

Colvin, Caran

Consoli, Andres

Corrigan, Robert

A.

Daniels,

Robert

Edwards, James

Fung, Robert

Garcia, Oswaldo

Garcia, Velia

Gemello, John

Gerson, Deborah

Gill, Sam

Gregory, Jan

Houlberg, Rick

Jerris, Scott

Johnson-Brennan,

Karen

Kassiola, Joel

Klironomos, Martha

Luft, Sandra

McKeon, Midori

Meredith, David

Morishita, Leroy

Nichols, Amy

Noble, Nancy

Otero, Aina J.

Pong, Wenshen

Raggio, Marcia

Short, Larry

Smith, Brett

Smith, Miriam

Steier,

Saul

Stowers, Genie

Strong, Rob

Su, Yuli

Terrell, Dawn

Turitz, Mitch

Vaughn, Pamela

Warren, Penelope

Whalen, Maureen

Williams, Robert

Wolfe, Bruce

Yang, Nini

Senate Members Absent:   Newt-Scott, Ronda (abs),  Fielden,

Ned (exc), Avila, Guadalupe (exc),

Collier, James

(exc)

Guests:  Marilyn

Verhey, Jaih McReynolds, Daniel Buttlaire,

ShyShenq Liou, Sung Hu,

Ann Hallum, Jonetta Richards, Yenbo Wu, Helen

Goldsmith, Julian Randolph, Gail Whitaker, Roy Conboy, Wan-Lee Cheng, Allen Abraham

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Senate Chair Robert Cherny announced the results of the campus-wide election:

for the Athletic Advisory Committee, John McWilliams, Professor of

Accounting was elected; for the University Advancement Activity Advisory Committee,

Martha Kilronomos, Modern Greek Studies,

and Heather Sisneros, Athletics, were elected.

Senate Chair Cherny commented on the passing of Dr. Peggy Smith,

Professor of the Department of Counseling and a 12-year member of the Academic

Senate serving from 1980 to 1985 and from 1991 to 1997. During her 12 years

of Senate service she was twice chair of the Student Affairs Committee and

once chair of the Academic Policy Committee.

Senator Andres Consoli, from the Department of Counseling, added that Dr. Peggy

Smith was a wonderful colleague and passionate about her work. She

made a tremendous contribution to the Department of Counseling and throughout

the campus.  She was a mentor and role model for students and faculty, and

played a significant leadership role on campus and throughout the state. The

faculty and students who came in contact with her will dearly miss her.

Senate Vice Chair Penny Warren, a colleague of Dr. Smith, added that, every

time one goes to the university web site to look up some policy, in some manner

it is a reflection of the work that Dr. Smith did as one of the co-chairs

of the Toward A User Friendly Campus work group of CUSP I. She was very dedicated

to making things easier to access and to making the policy processes more

open. She was a very valued colleague for that strategic planning process.

She also was the founder of a clinical training program on campus that is

one of the more sought after field placements for graduate students in the

Department of Counseling. We have only really begun to recount some of the

contribution that Dr. Smith made to this campus in the way of service.

Senator Bruce Wolfe

reminded all senators and guests of the importance of today’s elections especially

in regards to the educationally important proposition 46, 47, and 52.

CHAIR’S

REPORT

The senate chair reminded

all faculty to vote in today’s important local, state

and national elections.

AGENDA ITEM #1 - APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA

FOR November 5, 2002

m/s/p (Houlberg, Aaron) to approve the agenda

as amended.

AGENDA ITEM #2 - APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES

FOR October

22, 2002

m/s/p (Carrington, Turitz) to approve the

minutes as amended.

AGENDA ITEM

#3 - ELECTION:  STUDENT CENTER GOVERNING

BOARD OF DIRECTORS-SENATE REPRESENTATIVE

Senate Chair Cherny announced that Larry Medcalf, Professor, Speech & Communication studies, has been unanimously nominated

by the Executive Committee as candidate for the Academic Senate’s appointment

to the Student Center Governing Board, F2002-S2003. This is a one-year term.

He opened the election to further nominations from the floor.

m/s/p

(Houlberg, Gregory) to close nomination, passed

m/s/p (Turitz, Terrell) to elect by acclimation.

Senator Rick Houlberg

inquired about the limitation of just a one-year appointment to the Student

Union Governing Board and asked if it could not be extended to multiple years?

Senate Chair Cherny indicated that the Student Union Governing Board

establishes the term of service and the Senator would have to address his

inquiry to them.

AGENDA ITEM #4 - REPORT FROM PROFESSOR JOHNETTA RICHARDS, S.F.S.U. REPRESENTATIVE

TO THE C.S.U. ACADEMIC COUNCIL ON INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

Johnetta Richards distributed to all Senators a packet of information

that outlined opportunities for faculty to participate in international programs.

She encouraged faculty to encourage students to apply to the various openings

for study abroad, and to apply themselves for the several open positions of

Resident Directors and the special international studies programs available

through CSU Partnerships. She mentions that many of these opportunities for

faculty to serve as resident directors are in such places as Japan, China, Mexico, Spain, France, and Italy. There is also the opportunity for 20-21 faculty to participate in a special overseas seminar that will

take place in Paris, France, this June 2003. She asked all interested faculty to

contact her directly about study aboard programs, tatenda@sfsu.edu. Senator Robert Williams indicated

that it would be helpful if department could encourage professors at the assistant

and associate level to apply for these position. Johnetta Richards advised that these are all wonderful opportunities

and that you do not need to be a full professor to apply.

AGENDA ITEM #5 - REPORT FROM ACTING

ASSOCIATE DEAN HELEN GOLDSMITH, ON THE CAMPUS IMPLEMENTATION OF S.B. 2042

Report from Acting

Associate Dean Helen Goldsmith on campus implementation of SB 2042 (teacher

preparation). The following are her remarks to the Senate:

First of all, I’d like

to thank you for giving me the opportunity to discuss our progress so far.

I know I’m giving a lot of information and would be happy to talk to any of

you individually. Teacher preparation in CA is complicated and sometimes overwhelming.

At the same time, it is one of our most important missions. We are in the

midst of major revisions to undergraduate and credential programs and are

attempting to maintain the quality and integrity of these programs while still

demonstrating to the CA Commission on Teacher Credentialing that we meet the

new standards.

History: Senate Bill 2042 was passed by the state Senate in 1998.

This legislation called for the development of multiple pathways to earning

a teaching credential in California. One of the goals of the legislation

was to diminish the divide between subject matter and education faculty and

coursework. This has indeed happened on our campus. In response to SB 2042,

over the past few years, SFSU has approved the minor in Education and created

blended/integrated multiple subject teacher education programs (the Liberal

Studies Integrated Teacher Education/LSITE program for first-time freshmen

and the CAD blended program for transfer students). Our first class of LSITE

students will be graduating in May 2003 and completing their credentials in

fall 2003.

What’s happening right

now: Currently our campus is in the

midst of major curricular revisions for our multiple and single subject credential

programs as well as our undergraduate subject matter preparation programs

in Liberal Studies and Child & Adolescent Development. All program revisions

are due to the CCTC by August

1, 2003, and must be in place by Spring

2004. Unfortunately, this means that all of these programs will be implemented

in the middle of the academic year. In Spring 2003,

the undergraduate programs will be coming to CRAC and the Senate for approval

of revisions to the majors. The Elementary and Secondary Education departments

have submitted new course proposals and currently are going through the College of Education’s review and approval process. All

programs will go to the Teacher Credentialing Committee and All-University

Teacher Education Committee for approval. I want to comment on the collegiality

of the process so far. I have been heartened by the amount of care and time

that departments and colleges have spent documenting existing courses or revising

or creating courses where necessary. I know that everyone has more on their

plate than is humanly possible and am extremely grateful to everyone for responding

to my pleas for assistance.  As many of you know, the new subject matter standards

are far more detailed and prescriptive than ever before. A few examples of

how our colleagues have responded: the History department has revised HIST

120 to extend the time covered to Reconstruction; the College of Science and

Engineering has developed new courses in life and physical science that will

better prepare future teachers in the sciences; the Colleges of Science, Ethnic

Studies, and Humanities are developing exciting new emphases for the Liberal

Studies major.

What’s next/still to

come: At the same time that subject matter

programs are being revised, the subject matter examinations are being revised

as well so that the subject matter knowledge that is taught and tested aligns

with the K-12 content standards and state curriculum frameworks. Beginning

Spring 2003, the PRAXIS/SSAT and MSAT will be replaced by the CSET (California

Subject Matter Examinations for Teachers) for multiple subjects, Science,

Math, English and Social Science. Last week, our campus served as a field

test site for these tests and approximately 120 students turned out to try

the exams. For secondary education, the subject matter standards in the core

areas of Science, Math, English and Social Science are currently in draft

form. You can respond to these standards at the CCTC website (www.ctc.ca.gov)

until November 15. The standards are scheduled to be reviewed and approved

by the commission at its December 5 meeting. Once approved, the commission

anticipates an 18-month window for campuses to revise their programs to meet

the newly approved standards. New programs will likely need to be in place

no later than spring or Fall 2005. The CCTC intends

to begin the second phase (Art, Music, PE, Languages other than English, and

preliminary Educational Technology) early in 2003 with an 18-month period

to develop the new standards for review. They will be developed under the

auspices of NES. The new standards for these subjects will probably be available

for review in Fall 2004. A third phase will be implemented sometime in the

future: including Agriculture, Business, Health Science, Home Economics, and

Industrial & Technology Education. Single subject faculty who would like

to become involved in the process have several opportunities:

for example, they may assist in the development of phase 2 subject area standards

or serve as readers for other campus programs.

Some Challenges ahead

for us at SFSU include:

  • Recruiting students to become

    teachers as the number of requirements increases and choices diminish

  • Ensuring that undergraduates

    and credential students get as much experience in the classroom without

    inundating local school districts with our students

  • Providing enough options so

    that students don’t encounter bottlenecks

Additional info: Contact

person for single subject: Phil Fitch for the 4 core subjects; Helen Hawley

for all (hhawley@ctc.ca.gov), www.cset.nesinc.com:

website showing current development status

Julian Randolph indicated that the

presentation was very important and well done, however,

it was a lot of information to digest. He was encouraged by the presentation

and believed that this important work would go a long way to relive the critical

shortage of teachers in California. Senator David Meredith asked Goldsmith to comment on the details that might be coming in the

multiple subject credential requirements. Goldsmith indicated that there would not be a blended program

in the same way that they were structured in the most recent past. She indicated

that what we might see is a teacher-training program that looks more like

the programs that were developed in the 1970s. One of the big changes dictated

by the new standards is in the specificity with which we are communicating

to students about what they need to take in the lower division GE courses.

Students preparing to be teachers will be required to take specific GE courses

and not allowed to select randomly from the entire list of GE courses offered.

Senator Jane Bernard-Powers, chair of Secondary Education, acknowledged that the work accomplished

so far had been remarkable. She indicated that the changes in courses were

most daunting, with the putting in place of the elementary teaching performance

expectation and the assessment for evaluation that will be in place starting

with the new teacher’s first semester. She acknowledged all faculty involved for their dedication and hard work in implementing

these new standards. Senator Bruce Wolfe raised the concern that the new more

restrictive GE requirements might be a barrier to for many students. He asked

if the committee was looking at this issue? Goldsmith indicated that the

new program requirements limit the choice within the overall GE selection.

She emphasized that they are working on making sure that information gets

out to the students. Senator Bruce Wolfe asked when would the new exam, the

CEST, be made public. Goldsmith indicated that the exam was field tested last week

and would be tested again soon. Senate Chair Cherny added that the single subject

areas of history, English, math, and since are all being discussed. The faculty

of the CSU got involved in the discussion and sent some 80 email messages

to Sacramento with suggestion for improvement. This was the most

input that Sacramento has received from CSU faculty members and they were quite impressed. He

emphasized that when additional standards come up for discussion that it will

again be an opportunity for CSU faculty to get involved.

AGENDA ITEM

#6 -RECOMMENDATION FROM THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: PROPOSED POLICY ON THE TEMPORARY

SUSPENSION OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS, 2ND READING

Senate Chair Robert Cherny introduced the revised proposed policy on the temporary suspension of academic

programs. He indicated that the new revisions came from recommendations made

during the Senate’s discussion of the proposed policy two weeks ago. It now

returns to the Senate in 2nd reading. Senator Sam Gill asked why did the

policy refer to six semesters and not just say three years. Senator Bruce Wolf, in answer to this

question, indicated that it might be because the University is heading toward

year round operations. Senate Chair Cherny indicated that, by using semester language then a department

could start or stop the process in the middle of the year rather than waiting

for the beginning and end of the year, the proposed policy gives more flexibility

to the department faculty.

The motion passed unanimously

Senate Chair Cherny acknowledge the

dedication and hard work of the former senate chair Pamela

Vaughn, who in turn also acknowledged the contributions of

Richard Giardina, Associate Vice President of Planning and Assessment, and

Gail

Whitaker, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs.

AGENDA ITEM

#7—RECOMMENDATION FROM THE CURRICULUM REVIEW AND APPROVAL COMMITTEE:  APPROVAL

OF CHANGES IN THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. DEGREE PROGRAM IN DRAMA, 1ST

AND 2NDREADINGS, AS A CONSENT

ITEM—TIME CERTAIN.

Senator Amy Nichols,

chair of the Curriculum Review and Approval committee introduced the revision

in Bachelor of Arts in Drama/Core Courses. This proposal comes forward as

a consent item following two reviews from CRAC.  The Theater Arts Department

proposes to make the revisions based on accreditation review recommendations,

ongoing student feedback, and faculty availability.  There are two changes

to the program: first change is that, in addition to THA 340 Principles of

Directing, they would like to add THA 341--History of Directing, THA 460--Play

Development Workshop, and THA 531--Understanding and Performing Shakespeare

as additional choices to meet the core requirement. The second change is to

require only THA 515--Stage Management due to the lack of faculty expertise

and the ability of THA 519/520 to complement THA 515. Present to answer questions

about the proposal were Roy Conboy, Chair

of Theater Arts, and Wan-Lee Cheng, Associate Dean College of Creative

Arts.

m/s/p (Nichols, Carrington)

to second reading

Senator Joel Kassiola asked for

clarification on the elimination of one course but the addition of four courses

as electives. Senator Nichols indicated that the four are not required, and that

only one from the four would be required by advisement.

m/s/p (Houlberg, Wolfe)

to vote

The motion passed.

AGENDA ITEM

#8—RECOMMENDATION FROM THE CURRICULUM REVIEW AND APPROVAL COMMITTEE:  APPROVAL

OF MASTER PLAN PROJECTION AND IMPLEMENTATION FOR A NEW B.S. DEGREE PROGRAM

IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING, 1ST AND 2NDREADINGS, AS A CONSENT

ITEM

Senator Amy Nichols,

Chair of the Curriculum Review and Approval Committee, introduced the proposed

new curriculum. She indicated that on the advice of the Chancellor's Office,

this proposal to create BS in Computer Engineering at SFSU had been prepared

as a single document that will serve two purposes. This proposal is both a

Master Plan Projection and, if the Board of Trustees at their meeting in March

approves it, it is an Implementation Plan to be sent out concurrently for

external review. Senate approval constitutes endorsement of both the Master

Plan Projection and Implementation Plan phases of this process. Once there

is Board of Trustee approval and a completed external review, the proposal

will return to SFSU for the development of the actual program that will then

to go through our approval process. Senate approval constitutes endorsement

of both the Master Plan and the tentative Implementation Plan phase of this

process. Sung Hu, the Associate Dean of the

College of Science and Engineering, was present to

answer any questions.

m/s/p (Nichols, Vaughn) to approve the proposed new curriculum, in 1st

reading.

Richard Giardina, Associate

Vice President of Planning and Assessment, representing Gail Whitaker, Associate

Vice President Academic Affairs, suggested that if the Senate is willing to

approve this proposal in a “fast track” approval process then the proposal

would not come back before the Senate but would go directly to implementation.

Senator Joel Kassiola suggested that he saw no need to “fast track”

this proposal and that the proposal, if approved, should come back before

the senate for approval after it is placed on the master plan. Senator

Amy Nichols indicated that during their committee deliberation that it

was not made clear that this was a “fast track” recommendation and that the

committee did not review it as a “fast track” proposal. Associate Dean

Sung Hu indicated that this new program proposal

is a result of three years of development by the School of Engineering and is now before the Senate with

the strong support of the Dean, faculty, and students. He indicated that the

proposal would have been before the Senate in previous years if it were not

for the extended search for a new dean. Senator Joel Kassiola asked

if CRAC wanted to reconsider its position.  Senate Chair Cherny ruled

that we would need to have an amendment to agenda item 8 if the proposal is

to be approved both for transmission to the Chancellor’s Office and for final

implementation on campus, however, we were not in second reading and therefore

any amendment would be out of order. Senator Saul Steier asked if the

proposed requirement for 134 units did not exceed the general requirement

that all degree strive to limit their degrees to 120 units. Associate Dean

Sung Hu indicated that it is normal for engineering

degrees to exceed 130 units; CSU Sacramento has a similar degree that requires

137 and San Jose

State degree requires 134. Senator

Scott Jerris asked about the requirement to have in excess of 61 units

in the major alone and would that not adversely impact GE and electives. Associate

Dean Sung Hu indicated that the CSU system allows for a maximum

of 78 units in a BS degree that requires 132 units. Senator Yu-Charn Chen

indicated that he was impressed with the overall quality and work

done on the proposal and suggested that the Senate approve it for “fast track”

consideration. Senator Wenshen Pong supported the “fast track” consideration

of the proposal and indicated that this is a great opportunity for the college

to establish itself as a leader in this field. There are a lot of students

waiting to enroll in this degree program.

m/s/p (Daniels, Houlberg) to extend debate by 10 minutes

Dan Buttlaire, Dean of Undergraduate Education,

indicated that student demand for the proposed program is very high, and he

has over the past few years found great interest by students to enroll in

this degree program.

m/s/p (Carrington, Meredith) to second reading

Senate Vice Chair Penny Warren asked members of CRAC if their deliberation

would have be any different if they were to known that it was a single review

process. Senator Amy Nichols, chair of CRAC, indicated that the review

process would have been very different since the committee did not know that

it was reviewing the proposal for fast track consideration. Senator Gregory

was concerned that, since CRAC did not know that it was a fast track curriculum,

maybe there is less detail in this proposal than what is normally required.

Senator Nichols agreed with Senator Gregory, that the proposal

is very timely and important, however, her suggestion

is that they should have the proposal come back to the committee with the

actual programs delineated in the proposal so we can evaluate it like other

proposal. Senator Pamela Vaughn indicated that as a member of the committee

that she would like a second look at it.

m/s/p (Kassiola, Steier) to refer the proposal back to committee, passed unanimously

AGENDA ITEM #9—RECOMMENDATION FROM THE CURRICULUM REVIEW AND APPROVAL COMMITTEE: 

APPROVAL OF CHANGES IN THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE PROGRAM IN KINESIOLOGY,

CONCENTRATIONS IN HUMAN MOVEMENT STUDIES AND IN EXERCISE SCIENCE AND FITNESS,

1ST AND 2NDREADINGS, AS A CONSENT ITEM

Senator Amy Nichols,

chair of the Curriculum Review and Approval Committee, recommended approval

of the changes to the requirements for the B.S. degree program in Kinesiology,

concentrations in Human Movement Studies and in Exercise Science and Fitness.

This proposal comes forward as a consent item following two reviews from CRAC. 

These changes represent an attempt to better incorporate faculty strengths

within the curriculum, infuse the psychological and cultural bases of performance

within the degree, and provide students with more options and better-delineated

career paths. In both cases, the core BS degree remains unchanged and the

changes occur only within the concentration requirement.  The changes are

based on recommendations from the last program review completed in 1999. Allen

Abraham was present to answer any questions regarding the proposed changes.

m/s (Nichols, Houlberg)

m/s/p (Vaughn, Steier) to second reading,

passed unanimously.

The motion passed

unanimously.

AGENDA ITEM #10—RECOMMENDATION FROM THE EDUCATIONAL POLICIES COUNCIL:  APPROVAL

OF DISCONTINUANCE OF THE B.A. DEGREE PROGRAM IN SCIENCE, CONCENTRATION IN

METEOROLOGY, 1ST AND 2NDREADINGS, AS A CONSENT ITEM.  TIME CERTAIN:  No Later Than 3:15 p.m.

Midori McKeon, chair of the Educational

Policies Council, indicated that her committee unanimously recommended approval

of the discontinuation of the B.A. degree program in Science, concentration

in Meteorology.  A new B.S. major degree program in Atmospheric and Oceanic

Sciences was approved in spring 2001 with the understanding that it would

replace the B.A. degree program in Science, concentration in Meteorology. 

The new program is a more rigorous program that will better prepare students

either for employment as a professional meteorologist or for graduate school.

m/s McKeon, Nichols

m/s/p (McKeon, Steier)

to second reading

The motion passed unanimously.

AGENDA ITEM

#11—RECOMMENDATION FROM THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:  AMENDMENTS

TO THE POLICY ON THE ALL-UNIVERSITY COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS, POLICY

#S87-151, 1ST AND 2NDREADINGS

Senator Jim Edwards, Chair of the Committee on Committee,

introduced the proposed amendments to Policy #S87. The Executive Committee

unanimously recommends the changes in the policy on the All-University Committee

on International Programs.  There are two significant changes in the policy.

At the request of AUCIP, a representative from the College of Extended Learning is added and the specification that the representatives

from colleges are to faculty members and that they are to be elected.  The

full policy can be read at #S87-151.

m/s (Edwards, Smith) Senate Chair Cherny indicated that there is a correction on line 5 and

asked senators to insert the words teaching faculty and to delete the

“s” from the word selected so that it would read elected. Senator Andres Consoli noted for correction of an error in editing on line

14. Senator Miriam Smith, chair of the All-University Committee on International Programs indicated

that the amendment meets the need to have a representative from the College of Extended learning. She also indicated that she did not want

to change in the policy to adversely affect the representatives from staff

that now serve on the committee. Senator Yu-Charn Chen noted that line 2 has been mislabeled as line 20. Senator Bruce Wolfe asked how many international

programs are available in the College of Extended Learning. Senator Miriam Smith indicated that they did not have an exact number of

international programs offered through Extended Learning. Yenbo Wu, Director of International

Programs, indicate that there are approximately 400 students enrolled in international

Extended Learning courses. Senator Bruce Wolfe expressed some concern

that international programs would be better served if they were offered in

the regular university programs. Senator Miriam Smith indicated that the objective of including

a representative from Extended Learning was to have a representative that

could speak for the international programs in that college. She indicated

that changing line 5 changing back to the original language would be best

from her perspective. Senator Pamela Vaughn asked if that would mean that each college would select

and not elect their representatives. She stressed that it is important for

the representatives to be elected by each college and not selected.

m/s/p (Meredith, Steier) to return to committee

AGENDA ITEM #12—RECOMMENDATION FROM THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

AMENDMENT TO THE POLICY ON THE ALL-UNIVERSITY COMMITTEE ON HONORARY DEGREES,

POLICY #S91-171, 1ST AND 2NDREADINGS, AS A CONSENT ITEM. 

Senator Dawn Terrell introduced the amendment to

the policy and indicated that the Executive Committee had unanimously recommended

changes in the policy on the Honorary Degree Committee. She indicated that

since the Staff Council no longer exists, the language of the policy must

be changed so that a staff representative can serve on the committee. Additionally,

the Senate as part of a constitutional amendment previously approved this

language. The faculty has not yet approved this constitutional amendment.

The full policy can be read at #S91-171.

m/s Terrell, Houlberg

m/s/p (Steier, Carrington) to second reading

The motion passed

unanimously.

AGENDA ITEM #13—RECOMMENDATION FROM THE STUDENT AFFAIRS

COMMITTEE:  RESOLUTION ON INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION, 1ST AND 2NDREADINGS. 

Senator Debra Gerson, chair of

the Student Affairs Committee introduced the resolution and asked for senate

support.

m/s (Gerson, Otero)

to accept the resolution

Senator Midori McKeon noted that

the resolution calls for a celebration during the second week of November,

however, the national celebration actually falls on during the third week.

Senator Gerson indicated that it

should read the third week.

m/s/p (Aaron, Wolfe)

second reading

The motion passed unanimously.

AGENDA ITEM #14—RECOMMENDATION FROM THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:  AMENDMENTS

TO THE POLICY ON THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS, POLICY #4H, 1ST

AND 2NDREADINGS

Senator Caran Colvin, chair of

the Faculty Affairs committee introduced proposed changes in the policy and

indicated that the Executive Committee had unanimously recommended the changes

in the policy on the protection of human subjects.  The changes come in response

to the floor discussion that took place several weeks ago and returns to the

Senate in first reading.  The full policy can be read at 4H .

m/s (Colvin, Oswaldo

Garcia)

m/s/p (Colvin, O. Garcia)

to second reading.

Senator Steier indicated that there might be some confusion around

the listing of so many different types of people and asked if the committee

had to have one individual of each type or could one individual with multiple

types be a combined representative. Senator Jane Bernard-Powers asked what determines a “non-scientific” member of

the committee. Senate Chair Robert Cherny indicated that both the designations for “different

types” and “non-scientific” were taken directly for the Federal guidelines.

Senator Robert Williams asked for

clarification on line 18 regarding additional numbers from HSS. Bruce Macher, Assistant

Vice President for Research and Sponsored Programs, indicated that federal and other protocols required

that the committee have individuals that have certain expertise. The committee

then seeks the individual with the appropriate expertise and adds them to

the committee deliberations for those protocols only. This would be under

temporary and special circumstances. Senator Genie Stowers indicated that the committee should have more than

one person from outside the sciences.

m/s (Stowers, Kassiola) to

change line 7 so That it would read to include at least three members from

outside the sciences.

Senator David Meredith asked for clarification on the

language; specifically what is the definition of “science”

as indicated in the policy. Bruce Macher indicated that the language is taken directly form

the federal guidelines. Senator Christopher Carrington, speaking against the amendment, indicated that he

does not support the expansion of the committee. Senator Mitch

Turitz asked what exactly

will be the membership of the committee-- 10 persons or seven? Senator Genie Stowers spoke in support of the amendment and indicated that

it would allow for the widest representation so that proposal may be properly

reviewed. Senator Bruce Wolfe spoke in favor of the motion and indicated that many proposals from students

go through the committee and it is very important that as much diversity as

possible is represented on the panel. Senator Rick Houlberg did not

support the amendment and felt that the additional requirements would hobble

the committee efforts to move forward. Senator Pamela Vaughn indicated that she is in favor

of a diverse committee, but added, however, that there are not a lot of people

interested in serving on our committee. She does feel that language defining

the sciences could be included in the language. Senator Robert Williams asked what

is the usual composition of this committee. Bruce Macher indicated that is difficult to say what the normal composition because it

changes each year and with different proposals. The committee has various

requirements that are set by federal guidelines. One of those requirements

is that the committee is includes a minimum of seven members. Senator Robert Williams indicated

that he does not support the amendment and prefers the original language.

m/s/p (Colvin, Steier) to close debate on

the amendment

The amendment failed.

The main motion

passed unanimously

AGENDA ITEM #15—ADJOURNMENT 

m/s/p (Consoli,

Warren) to adjourn

3:57 P.M. with one minute of silence in memory

of  Dr. Peggy Smith.

Respectfully submitted,

James Edwards

Secretary to the Faculty

…………