General Education Enrollment Policy Revisions

Reference Number: S05-064
Senate Approval Date: Tuesday, April 26, 2005
Presidential Approval Date: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2005

San Francisco State University

General Education Program Policy Consolidation

This document consolidates all previously approved policies, amendments, and revisions of the GE policy dating from 1977 through 2001: S77-15, F80-64, S81-73, S82-91, S85-132, S88-64, F88-157, S89-162, S93-107, S99-64, S01-01 (Segment II Revision), S01-02 (Segment III Revision).

Superseded by F10-255 (PDF)

 

Table of Contents

I. General Educational Program Philosophy and Principles

II. General Education Program Unit Distribution Requirements

III. General Education Segment I: Basic Subjects Requirements

IV. General Education Segment II: Arts and Sciences Core Requirements

V. General Education Segment III: Relationships of Knowledge Requirement

VI. General Education Program Implementation and Administration

 

I. General Education Program Philosophy and Principles

General education introduces students to a lifetime of learning about themselves and about the world in which they live. Above all, general education should sharpen students’ abilities for continued intellectual growth and should develop an awareness of and appreciation for the tentative nature of human knowledge that must constantly be added to, subtracted from, and modified in light of subsequent discoveries.

 

Principle 1: The first goal of general education is to develop basic competency in communication, critical thinking, and quantitative reasoning.

An educated person should be able to communicate with clarity and force, to read with discrimination and understanding, and to think with precision and creativity. The Segment I GE curriculum develops a disciplined use of language for effective communication, builds disciplined thought processes for sharpened analytical skills, and helps students develop greater ability and confidence to reason and make judgments about mathematically based information. Principle one is achieved in SFSU’s GE Segment I – Basic Subjects that consists of four requirements: Written Communication, Oral Communication, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Reasoning.

Principle 2: The second goal of general education is to develop an understanding of the contributions and influences of the physical and biological sciences, the behavioral and social sciences, the humanities and creative arts toward the development of civilization and toward the identification, investigation, and resolution of individual and societal problems.

The Arts and Sciences Core helps students develop an understanding of the contributions to and influences on our world of the physical and biological sciences, the social sciences, the humanities, and the creative arts. Through study of the arts and sciences students are introduced to theories and methods of inquiry and assessment particular to these disciplines and how this knowledge is applicable to an understanding and appreciation of others and oneself. Students are exposed to multiple ways of acquiring knowledge and encouraged to participate actively in creative endeavors. Within Segment II, students gain information that will be useful to their lifelong personal development (Lifelong Development-LLD) and to their development as active and constructive participants in a diverse society (American Ethnic and Racial Minorities-AERM).

Through the physical and biological sciences curriculum, students develop skills in applying scientific methods to the search for an understanding of the components and processes that constitute our physical and biological world, and an understanding of the connections between scientific developments and contemporary issues that affect our lives.

Through the behavioral and social sciences curriculum, students enhance the understanding of themselves and others as psychological and social beings. The curriculum develops skills for analyzing human behavior and for evaluating facts and principles relevant to making social policy. Course work is designed to foster civic and global responsibility as well as an appreciation for diverse values and past and present cultural traditions.

Through the humanities and arts curriculum, students are urged to explore the fundamental questions regarding human values, aesthetics, and expression. The curriculum is dedicated to stimulating reflective thinking, imagination, and creativity; to increasing civic and global responsibility; to cultivating moral action; and to building the communication skills needed to express the best of what it means to be a human.

At SFSU one of the premises of GE is to develop an appreciation and an understanding of the richness, diversity, and heritage of America’s ethnic and racial minorities as well as its cultural ethnic and social pluralism. This element of SFSU’s GE program is achieved in its American Ethnic and Racial Minority AERM courses. A general education should also equip students for lifelong understanding and development of themselves as integrated physiological, social, and psychological individuals. The element of SFSU’s GE program is achieved through its Lifelong Development (LLD) courses. Principle two is achieved in SFSU’s GE Segment II – Arts and Sciences Core which consists of the Physical and Biological Sciences, the Humanities and Creative Arts, the Behavioral and Social Sciences, the American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Requirement, and the Lifelong Development Requirement.

 

Principle 3: The third goal of general education is to promote an appreciation of the interrelationships among knowledge, values and skills. Students benefit from knowledge about:

· The value and significance of human achievements.

· The experiences and achievements of various cultural, ethnic, or social groups.

· The complexity of personal, cultural, and social problems and issues.

· The impacts and consequences of solutions to existing or newly created problems.

· The problems, issues, or solutions confronted by various social, ethnic, or cultural groups and how they may be experienced in different ways.

· The integration of their abilities, knowledge, and experience in making decisions.

· The prevalence of cultural, social, personal, and/or procedural biases.

· The use of effective procedures for investigating problems and issues.

SFSU achieves this principle through its GE Segment III- Relationships of Knowledge requirement. This component of our GE program consists of three upper-division courses that must be selected from an approved, internally cohesive, interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary, thematic cluster.

 

II. General Education Program Unit Distribution Requirements

 

A. SFSU’s General Education Requirements for Native Students include:

 

SEGMENT I: Basic Subjects Requirements – 12-Units ____________

 

Written Communication 3-Units

Oral Communication 3-Units

Critical Thinking 3-Units

Quantitative Reasoning 3-Units

 

Minimum Units: Segment I-Basic Subjects Requirements 12-Units

 

SEGMENT II: Arts and Sciences Core Requirements – 27-Units ____________

 

Physical and Biological Sciences (PBS) Area 9-Units

Humanities and Creative Arts (HCA) Area 9-Units

Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSS) Area 9-Units

 

Minimum Units: Segment II: Arts and Sciences Core 27-Units

 

SEGMENT III: Relationships of Knowledge Requirement – 9-Units ______

 

Minimum Units in a Single GE Segment III Cluster 9-Units

SFSU undergraduate students must complete a minimum of 9-units of upper-division course work in residence at SFSU in a single GE Segment III cluster during or after the semester in which they achieve upper division standing (i.e. 60 semester units). The Segment III curriculum is viewed as the culminating experience of our general education program. As such, it requires students to interrelate the knowledge and abilities that they have gained in Segments I and II of their GE course work with the knowledge and abilities they have acquired in their major courses. Each of the four GE Segment I-Basic Subjects courses must be completed before students may register for GE Segment III courses.

Minimum General Education Units Required for Graduation: 48-Units

 

 

B. Duplicate Use of GE Courses and Units Policy: No GE course can be used to fulfill more than one general education category, segment, or area. For example, students cannot use the same course to satisfy both a Segment II requirement and a Segment III requirement of the General Education program. Further, courses taken at SFSU to fulfill the U.S. History and Government requirement (6-units minimum) cannot be used to fulfill General Education requirements.

 

However, a maximum of 12 semester units, used in fulfillment of SFSU’s General Education requirements, may also be used in fulfillment of requirements for a major and/or program requirements as submitted on the approved Application for Graduation. This practice is referred to as “duplicate use.” While the duplicate use of GE courses and units may be used in fulfillment of both General Education requirements and requirements in a major, the units for these courses shall be counted only once toward fulfillment of the minimum units required for award of the baccalaureate degree (i.e. BA, BM or BS).

 

The following are additional rules governing duplicate use:

 

  1. A maximum of 6-units of the 9-unit GE Segment III, upper division requirement may be used in fulfillment of major requirements. Therefore, one course chosen in Segment III must be both outside the prefix of the major department and outside the major program presented in the Application for Graduation. Liberal Studies majors are exempt from this rule and may use 9-units of duplicate credit in GE Segment III.

 

  1. Engineering majors are exempt from the Duplicate Use of GE Courses and Units Policy (see Appendix A: General Education Requirements for Engineering Majors).

 

C. GE Course Enrollment Policy: GE Course Enrollment Policy: GE classes are open to all students who meet the course prerequisites through all phases of registration, within the specified enrollment limits. GE courses may not list major(s) as a prerequisite. Enrolled students may not be dropped from a GE course on the basis of major or class level (unless upper division status is a prerequisite).

D. GE Course Prerequisite Policy: The following course prerequisite policies apply to all courses submitted for GE review and approval.

  1. GE Segment I oral communication and critical thinking courses may not have any prerequisites.*
  2. Prerequisites for GE Segment I written communication courses are restricted to ENG 114 or its equivalent.*
  3. Prerequisites for GE Segment I quantitative reasoning are restricted to:
    • Passage of the Entry Level Mathematics (ELM) exam,
    • ELM exam course and test exemptions,
    • Required remedial mathematics courses,
    • MATH 109, or
    • Equivalents to the above.
  4. Prerequisites for GE Segment II courses are restricted to:
    • GE Segment I courses,
    • GE Segment II courses,
    • Statutory Requirement courses (i.e. courses that meet the U.S. History and U.S. Government requirements),
    • Individual course placement tests,
    • Generic course prerequisites (e.g., a psychology course, a biology course, a history course and so forth), or
    • Equivalents to the above.
  5. Prerequisites for GE Segment III courses must not unduly restrict access to completing a cluster and are restricted to upper division standing or:
    • GE Segment I courses,
    • GE Segment II courses,
    • Statutory Requirement courses,
    • Other GE Segment III courses in the same cluster,
    • Individual course placement tests,
    • Generic course prerequisites (e.g., a psychology course, a biology course, a history course and so forth), or
    • Equivalents to the above.

6. Students shall not be held to prerequisites that are not specified in the current University Bulletin.

 

*This prerequisite policy does not apply to English as a Second Language (ESL) program courses that are approved for the General Education Program. The ESL program has its own requirements (see the University Bulletin). Placement in ESL courses is determined by the ESL coordinator on the basis of SFSU’s English as a Second Language Placement Test (ESLPT) only and ESL prerequisite courses.

 

III. General Education Segment I: Basic Subjects Requirements

A. Underlying Principles of the GE Segment I Basic Subjects Requirements. An educated person should be able to communicate with clarity and force, to read with discrimination and understanding, and to think with precision and creativity. The Segment I GE curriculum develops a disciplined use of language for effective communication, builds disciplined thought processes for sharpened analytical skills, and helps students develop greater ability and confidence to reason and make judgments about mathematically based information. SFSU’s GE Segment I: Basic Subjects requirements include: Written Communication, Oral Communication, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Reasoning.

B. GE Segment I Course Expectations and Student Learning Outcomes. The following course expectations and student learning outcomes have been developed by the GE Segment I Committee. Courses proposed for specific GE Segment I requirements will be evaluated on the extent to which they meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes specified below.

GE Segment I - Critical Thinking - Course Expectations (see Appendix B1). Courses approved for GE Segment I Critical Thinking should:

1. Develop skills of inquiry and critical thinking.

2. Encourage students to employ these skills (inquiry, critical thinking) on themselves and society.

GE Segment I - Critical Thinking - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix B2). After completion of a GE Segment I Critical Thinking course, students should be capable of:

  1. Recognizing, articulating, and questioning assumptions and presuppositions underlying discourse, including one's own.
  2. Identifying formal and informal fallacies of language and thought.
  3. Distinguishing arguments from other forms of discourse, and premises from conclusions.
  4. Using language critically and precisely.
  5. Identifying suppressed and overlooked evidence.
  6. Writing reasoned discourse that provides a detailed evaluation of a complex argument, including possible objections to it.

GE Segment I - Oral Communication - Course Expectations (see Appendix C1). Courses approved for GE Segment I Oral Communication should:

1. Emphasize the content of speech as well as its form.

2. Explain how an individual's background, identity, or perceptions influence communication.

3. Explore the social significance of communication, including how it operates in various situations.

4. Take a rhetorical perspective, emphasizing reasoning and advocacy, organization and accuracy as well as the discovery, critical evaluation, and reporting of information.

5. Require active participation in oral communication.

GE Segment I - Oral Communication - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix C2). After completion of a GE Segment I Oral Communication course, students should be capable of:

  1. Demonstrating awareness of the complexity of communication in terms of its psychological, social, political, cultural, and ethical dimensions.
  2. Demonstrating knowledge about verbal and nonverbal communication in various contexts (e.g., interpersonal, small group, public speaking, intercultural).
  3. Reducing their own speech anxiety and projecting greater confidence as a speaker.
  4. Listening actively and providing constructive feedback.
  5. Considering an audience's knowledge, background and attitudes when constructing a message.
  6. Recognizing and articulating issues from one's own perspective, while acknowledging the perspectives of others.
  7. Locating, evaluating and reporting information in support of a point of view.
  8. Assessing claims or arguments as a speaker and listener.
  9. Organizing, constructing, and delivering prepared and spontaneous presentations.
  10. Demonstrating effective verbal and nonverbal delivery skills.

GE Segment I - Quantitative Reasoning - Course Expectations (see Appendix D1). Courses approved for GE Segment I Quantitative Reasoning should:

1. Improve student abilities to incorporate mathematical ideas in their thinking and discourse.

2. Develop skills and confidence in interpreting, creating, and using mathematical expressions.

3. Provide for conceptual understanding of mathematical reasoning and its application.

4. Increase students’ appreciation for the importance of quantitative skills and the relevance of quantitative reasoning to everyday life.

5. Increase awareness of issues concerning the appropriate use of quantitative data and procedures.

6. Improve students’ ability to use mathematics.

GE Segment I - Quantitative Reasoning - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix D2). After completion of a GE Segment I Quantitative Reasoning course, students should be capable of:

1. Translating between verbal statements and mathematical expressions.

2. Understanding mathematics both as a descriptive language and a set of techniques.

3. Applying quantitative information and procedures to contexts both inside and outside the classroom.

4. Presenting and summarizing information in quantitative form.

5. Interpreting, making judgments about, and drawing conclusions from quantitative material.

6. Performing mathematical calculations.

7. Using appropriate technology for mathematical operations.

8. Evaluating critically the uses of quantitative procedures and descriptions, including identifying appropriate applications and deceptive or erroneous reasoning.

9. Constructing mathematical models.

GE Segment I - Written Communication - Course Expectations (see Appendix E1). Courses approved for GE Segment I Written Communication should:

1. Require the reading of substantial texts worthy of critique and analysis.

2. Provide students with opportunities to read critically and analyze discipline-specific texts.

3. Provide students with ample opportunities to practice their writing.

4. Provide for thorough and demanding instructor critique of student writing.

5. Require significant amounts of writing in order to enhance student composition skills.

6. Require individual papers (drafts and final) ranging in length from 500 to 2,000 words.

7. Require total writing assignments (drafts and final) ranging from 8,000 to 10,000 words.

8. Require composition practice exercises in the use of clear reasoning, organization, accuracy in language use, and the ability to discover, critically evaluate, and report information.

GE Segment I - Written Communication - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix E2). After completion of a GE Segment I Written Communication course, students should be capable of:

1. Attaining writing skills suitable for upper division course work.

2. Understanding discipline-specific texts thoroughly and using them as a basis for their writing assignments.

3. Formulating a thesis based on their readings.

4. Substantiating a thesis through appropriate references to primary and secondary texts, and through personal insights.

5. Distinguishing between adequate and inadequate substantiation of a thesis or topic, both at the essay and the paragraph levels.

6. Writing essays and paragraphs that are well focused and relevant to the subject identified in their theses and topics.

7. Demonstrating knowledge of the principles of sentence development through the ability to develop ideas within a single, complex sentence, rather than in an accretion of simple sentences.

8. Writing compositions that are mainly free of significant errors in usage, writing mechanics, and spelling.

C. GE Segment I Committee Charge, Membership, Terms of Service, and Chair.

1. Committee Charge: The GE Segment I Basic Subjects Committee will evaluate and recommend to the GEC course proposals for GE Segment I based on their adequacy in fulfilling the stated GE course expectations and student learning outcomes for the specific Segment I Basic Subject requirement for which they are proposed. The Segment I Committee's reasons for recommending the disapproval of courses will be stated in writing to the GEC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for the Segment I requirement for which the courses were proposed. At the request of the GEC, the GE Segment I Committee shall periodically review Segment I course expectations and student learning outcomes for their continued currency and adequacy for satisfying GE assessment requirements. The chair of the Segment I Committee is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the GEC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations. The Segment I Committee shall consult and coordinate its work with that of the Committee on Written English Proficiency (CWEP).

2. Committee Membership, Charge, Terms of Service, and Chair: Seven (7) Members. The GE Segment I Committee shall be composed of the following seven members:

· One representative from the Department of English

· One representative from the Department of Speech

· One representative from the Department of Philosophy

· One representative from the Department of Mathematics

· Two At-Large Representatives: The Academic Senate shall solicit nominees from a pool of qualified candidates from among those colleges/areas not currently represented on this committee to include the colleges/areas of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Business, Creative Arts, Education, Ethnic Studies, Health and Human Services, the Library, and Student Affairs; but not from the colleges of Humanities or Science and Engineering. The Academic Senate will conduct “At Large” elections and disseminate the election results to the GEC and to the deans/administrators for those “At Large” candidates elected by their respective colleges/areas.

· One Student Representative: The Academic Senate shall request from the President of the Associated Student government a student nominee to serve on the GE Segment I Committee. The President of the Associated Students shall nominate/select a student to serve on the Segment I Committee for a one-year term. The Academic Senate will forward the name of the student nominee to the GEC Chair by the fourth week of the fall semester of each academic year.

The Academic Senate shall notify college deans when there are Segment I Committee vacancies in their colleges. College representatives shall be nominated and elected to Segment I Committee vacancies by faculty members in their respective colleges.

3. Committee Terms of Service: All terms are for three years and shall be staggered and rotated among the members, except for the student representative who will only serve for one year.

 

4. Committee Chair: The chair will be elected by the members of the GE Segment I Committee.

D. Criteria and Guidelines for Submitting and Reviewing GE Segment I Course Proposals. When submitting GE courses for review by the GE Segment I Committee, departments must:

  1. Receive the approval of the University Course Review Committee (CRC). Courses that are not first approved by the University Course Review Committee will not be considered for inclusion in GE Segment I.
  2. Submit to the Office of Undergraduate Studies, for transmittal to the Segment I Committee, a copy of the approved course proposal form, a current course syllabus, a completed Course Expectations Matrix, and a completed Student Learning Outcomes Matrix for each proposed course. Proposed Segment I courses will be evaluated on the extent to which they fulfill the course expectations and the student learning outcomes specified in this policy for each Segment I requirement. 3. Prepare and submit a GE Segment I course proposal in accordance with those submission requirements and guidelines that may be developed by the GEC in consultation with the GE Segment I Committee and in accordance with criteria, guidelines, and procedures contained in this policy and its appendices (see Appendices F and G).

E. Assessment of Segment I Course Offerings: The GE Segment I Committee will evaluate and recommend to the GEC course proposals for the Segment I requirements for which the courses are proposed based on their adequacy in fulfilling the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for the specific Segment I requirement (see Appendices B1-E1 - GE Segment I Course Expectations Matrices and Appendices B2-E2 - GE Segment I Student Learning Outcomes Matrices). The roles and responsibilities of each of the parties to the GE course and program assessment processes are specified in Appendix G: GE Program Assessment Plan, Roles, and Responsibilities.

IV. General Education Segment II: The Arts and Sciences Core Requirements

A. Underlying Principles of the GE Segment II Arts and Sciences Core Requirements. The Arts and Sciences Core helps students develop an understanding of the contributions to, and influences on, our world of the physical and biological sciences, the behavioral and social sciences, and the humanities and creative arts. Through study of the arts and sciences students are introduced to theories and methods of inquiry and assessment particular to these disciplines and to how this knowledge is applicable to an understanding and appreciation of others and oneself. Students are exposed to multiple ways of acquiring knowledge and encouraged to participate actively in creative endeavors. Within Segment II, students gain information that will be useful to their lifelong personal development (Lifelong Development Requirement - LLD) and to their development as active and constructive participants in our diverse American society (American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Requirement - AERM).

In the physical and biological sciences curriculum, students develop skills in applying scientific methods to the search for understanding of the components and processes that constitute the physical and biological sciences and an understanding of the connections between scientific developments and contemporary issues that affect our lives.

In the humanities and creative arts curriculum, students are urged to explore the fundamental questions regarding human values, aesthetics, and expression. The curriculum is designed to stimulate reflective thinking, imagination, and creativity; to increase civic and global responsibility; to cultivate moral action; and to build the communication skills needed to express the best of what it means to be a human.

In the behavioral and social sciences curriculum, students should enhance their understanding of themselves and others as psychological and social beings. The curriculum develops skills for analyzing human behavior and for evaluating facts and principles relevant to making social policy. Course work is designed to foster civic and global responsibility as well as an appreciation for diverse values and cultural traditions, past and present.

At SFSU one of the underlying premises of general education is to develop an appreciation and an understanding of the richness, diversity, and heritage of America’s ethnic and racial minorities as well as its cultural, ethnic, and social pluralism. This important aspect of SFSU’s GE program is achieved in those Segment II courses designated as meeting our American Ethnic and Racial Minorities requirement (AERM). A general education should also equip students for lifelong understanding and development of themselves as integrated physiological, social, and psychological individuals. This element of our general education program is achieved in those Segment II courses that are designated as meeting our Lifelong Development requirement (LLD).

 

These principles are achieved in SFSU’s GE Segment II – Arts and Sciences Core which includes three Areas: the Physical and Biological Sciences (PBS), the Humanities and Creative Arts (HCA), and the Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSS), and two overlay requirements: the Lifelong Development requirement (LLD) and the American Ethnic and Racial Minorities requirement (AERM).

In keeping with the above Segment II principles and the overarching goal of a broad exposure to the arts and sciences, no more than six units of the nine-unit minimum in each Segment II Area (PBS, BSS, and HCA) may include courses with the same departmental prefix (e.g. HIST).

 

 

 

B. GE Segment II: Physical and Biological Sciences (PBS) Area - 9-Units Minimum. In the Physical and Biological Sciences Area, students must complete a minimum of 9-units of course work including one course from each of the following three PBS Categories:

1. Category A: Physical Sciences

2. Category B: Biological Sciences

3. Category C: Integrative Sciences

In the Physical and Biological Sciences Area, students must also complete at least one course that is designated as fulfilling the laboratory or field requirement (L/F).

GE Segment II: Physical and Biological Sciences Area - Course Expectations. The following course expectations have been developed by the GE Segment II PBS Committee. Courses proposed for a specific GE Segment II PBS Category will be evaluated on the extent to which they meet the course expectations for that Category as specified below.

PBS Category A-Physical Sciences and PBS Category B-Biological Sciences – Course Expectations (see Appendix H1). Courses proposed for PBS Category A-Physical Sciences and PBS Category B-Biological Sciences must include:

  1. Foundational knowledge and principles about living and/or non-living systems, and
  2. Pertinent methods of scientific inquiry.

 

PBS Category C-Integrative Sciences – Course Expectations (see Appendix H2). Courses proposed for PBS Category C: Integrative Sciences must include course expectations #1 and #2 above as well as fulfill at least one of the three PBS Category C course expectations listed below.

 

  1. Interrelationships among the major scientific disciplines.
  2. The influences of the sciences on various civilizations and their connections to modern society and contemporary issues.
  3. An analysis of the benefits and hazards of modern technology.

PBS Area Requirement (i.e. PBS Category A, B and C Courses) - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix H3 for PBS Categories A and B, and Appendix H4 for Category C). After completion of each course in the Physical and Biological Sciences Area, students should be capable of:

  1. Demonstrating verbal, qualitative, and quantitative understanding of scientific knowledge and principles.
  2. Using critical thinking skills, such as analysis and interpretation of scientific data, integrative application of scientific concepts to problem solving, hypothetical/deductive/inductive reasoning, and distinguishing fact and logical inferences from judgment and opinion.

 

PBS Category C-Integrative Sciences - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix H4). After completion of a course approved for PBS Category C: Integrative Sciences, students should be capable of fulfilling the two student learning outcomes listed above for the PBS Area requirement courses, and should also be capable of fulfilling at least one of the three student learning outcomes listed below for PBS Category C-Integrative Sciences courses.

 

  1. Applying integrative science concepts to problem solving.
  2. Understanding relationships between science and society.

3. Understanding related technologies and their costs, benefits, and limitations.

PBS Lab/Field - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix H5): After completion of a PBS course designated as fulfilling the PBS laboratory or field requirement, students should be capable of:

1. Demonstrating data gathering, analysis, and interpretation skills.

C. Segment II - Physical and Biological Sciences Area - Committee Charge, Membership, Terms of Service, and Chair.

1. Committee Charge: The Physical and Biological Sciences Committee (PBS) will evaluate and recommend to the GEC course proposals for the GE Segment II PBS Area/Categories based on their adequacy in fulfilling the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for the PBS Category for which they are proposed. The PBS Committee's reasons for disapproval of courses will be stated in writing to the GEC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for the PBS Category for which they were submitted. At the request of the GEC, the GE Segment II PBS Committee shall periodically review the PBS course expectations and student learning outcomes to ensure their continued currency and adequacy for satisfying GE assessment requirements. The chair of the PBS Committee is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the GEC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations.

2. Committee Membership: Five (5) Members. The PBS Committee shall be composed of the following five members:

  • Three members from the College of Science and Engineering to include representatives from both the physical sciences and the biological sciences.

· One At-Large Representative: The Academic Senate will solicit nominees from a pool of qualified candidates from among those colleges/areas not currently represented on this committee to include the colleges/areas of the Behavioral and Social Sciences, Business, Creative Arts, Education, Ethnic Studies, Health and Human Services, Humanities, the Library and Student Affairs; but not from the College of Science and Engineering. The Academic Senate will conduct “At Large” elections and disseminate the election results to the GEC and to the deans/administrators for those “At Large” candidates elected by their respective colleges/areas.

  • One Student Representative: The Academic Senate shall request a student nominee to serve on the Segment II PBS Committee from the President of the Associated Student government. The President of the Associated Students shall nominate/select a student to serve on the PBS Committee for a one-year term. The Academic Senate will forward the name of the student nominee to the GEC Chair by the fourth week of the fall semester of each academic year.

The Academic Senate shall notify college deans when there are PBS Committee vacancies in their colleges. College representatives shall be nominated and elected to the PBS Committee vacancies by faculty members in their respective colleges.

3. Committee Terms of Service: All terms are for three years and shall be staggered and rotated among the members, except for the student representative who will serve for one year.

4. Committee Chair: The chair will be elected by the members of the Segment II PBS Committee.

D. GE Segment II: Humanities and Creative Arts (HCA) Area – 9-Units Minimum. In the GE Segment II, Humanities and Creative Arts Area, students must complete a minimum of 9-units of course work in at least three of the following five HCA Categories:

  1. Category A: Major Humanistic/Artistic Achievements.

2. Category B: Disciplines and Inter-disciplines.

3. Category C: Historical, Social, Ethnic, Cultural Contexts.

4. Category D: Active Creative Participation.

5. Category E: Languages Other than English.

GE Segment II: Area of the Humanities and Creative Arts - Course Expectations. The following course expectations have been developed by the GE Segment II HCA Committee. Courses proposed for a specific GE Segment II, HCA Category will be evaluated on the extent to which they meet the course expectations for each HCA Category as specified below.

HCA Category A: Major Humanistic/Artistic Achievements - Course Expectations (see Appendix I1). Courses proposed for HCA Category A must include:

 

  1. Individual humanistic/artistic achievements reflecting the world's civilizations.
  2. An understanding of the nature of aesthetic perception and the development of students’ awareness of the creative and aesthetic dimensions of their experiences.

 

HCA Category B: Disciplines and Inter-disciplines - Course Expectations (see Appendix I2). Courses proposed for HCA Category B must include:

 

  1. Particular academic perspectives on the humanities and creative arts, stressing methods of interpreting, valuing, and criticizing in given fields or areas (minimum 2 units).
  2. Particular understandings, attitudes, and abilities relevant to human values and personal development.

 

HCA Category C: Historical, Social Ethnic and Cultural Contexts - Course Expectations (see Appendix I3). Courses proposed for HCA Category C must include:

 

  1. Exploration of cultural contexts that have produced the humanities and creative arts.
  2. An understanding of how the values of a culture shape the attitudes of its people and affect societal institutions.

 

HAC Category D: Active Creative Participation - Course Expectations (see Appendix I4). Courses proposed for HCA Category D must include:

 

  1. Exploration of a medium (or combined media) of artistic expression, active involvement in an art form, and a critical understanding of the creative process (minimum of 2 units).
  2. An understanding of aesthetic perception and an awareness of the significance of the creative and aesthetic dimensions of students’ experiences.

 

HCA Category E: Languages Other than English - Course Expectations (see Appendix I5). Courses proposed for HCA Category E must include:

 

  1. Classroom instruction in a language other than English.
  2. Course content that focuses on learning that language –including studies of cultural and literary products in that language.
  3. An understanding of how the values of a culture shape the attitudes of its people and affect societal institutions.

GE Segment II: Area of the Humanities and Creative Arts - Student Learning Outcomes. After completion of a course in a specific HCA Category listed below, students should be capable of demonstrating the student learning outcome(s) specified for that HCA Category.

HCA Category A: Major Humanistic/Artistic Achievements - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix J1). After completion of a course in HCA Category A, students should be capable of:

 

  1. Comparing, evaluating, and appreciating works of literature, philosophy, visual arts, or performing arts.

 

HCA Category B: Disciplines and Inter-disciplines - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix J2). After completion of a course in HCA Category B, students should be capable of:

 

  1. Applying a theoretical and critical perspective to the study of the arts and humanities.

 

HCA Category C: Historical, Social Ethnic and Cultural Contexts - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix J3). After completion of a course in HCA Category C, students should be capable of:

 

  1. Appreciating the relationship between creative works and their historical and social contexts.

 

HCA Category D: Active Creative Participation - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix J4). After completion of a course in HCA Category D, students should be capable of:

 

  1. Developing an introductory-level proficiency in one of the creative arts.

 

HCA Category E: Languages Other than English - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix J5). After completion of a course in HCA Category E, students should be capable of:

 

  1. Developing an awareness of cultural difference and an introductory-level proficiency in a language other than English.

E. Segment II: Humanities and Creative Arts Area Committee Charge, Membership, Terms of Service, and Chair.

1. Committee Charge: The Humanities and Creative Arts (HCA) Committee will evaluate and recommend to the GEC course proposals for the Segment II HCA Area based on their adequacy in fulfilling the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for the HCA Area as well as for the HCA Category for which they are submitted. The HCA Committee's reasons for disapproval of courses will be stated in writing to the GEC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for HCA Area courses. At the request of the GEC, the GE Segment II HCA Committee shall periodically review the HCA Area course expectations and student learning outcomes to ensure their continued currency and adequacy for satisfying GE assessment requirements. The chair of the HCA Committee is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the GEC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations.

2. Committee Membership: Seven (7) Members. The HCA Committee shall be composed of the following seven members:

· Two representatives from the College of Humanities

· Two representatives from the College of Creative Arts

· One representatives from the College of Ethnic Studies

· One “At-Large” Representative: The Academic Senate will solicit nominees from a pool of qualified candidates from among those colleges/areas not currently represented on this committee to include the colleges/areas of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Business, Education, Health and Human Services, Science and Engineering, the Library and Student Affairs; but not from the colleges of Creative Arts, Ethnic Studies, or Humanities. The Academic Senate will conduct “At Large” elections and disseminate the election results to the GEC and to the deans/administrators for those “At Large” candidates elected by their respective colleges/areas.

· One Student Representative: The Academic Senate shall request a student nominee to serve on the Segment II HCA Committee from the President of the Associated Student government. The President of the Associated Students will nominate/select a student to serve on the HCA Committee for a one-year term. The Academic Senate will forward the name of the student nominee to the GEC Chair by the fourth week of the fall semester of each academic year.

The Academic Senate shall notify college deans when there are HCA Committee vacancies in their colleges. College representatives shall be nominated and elected to HCA Committee vacancies by faculty members in their respective colleges.

3. Committee Terms of Service: All terms are for three years and shall be staggered and rotated among the members, except for the student representative who will serve for one year.

4. Committee Chair: The chair will be elected by the members of the HCA Committee.

F. GE Segment II: Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSS) Area – 9-Units Minimum. In the Behavioral and Social Sciences Area, students must complete a minimum of 9-units including one course from each of the following three Categories:

  1. Category A: Individual in Social Context
  2. Category B: Decision-making and Social Policy at the Societal Level
  3. Category C: Historical, Cross-cultural, Ethnic, and Global Contexts

GE Segment II: Area of the Behavioral and Social Sciences - Course Expectations. The following course expectations have been developed by the GE Segment II BSS Committee. Courses proposed for a specific GE Segment II BSS Category will be evaluated on the extent to which they meet the course expectations for that Category as specified below.

BSS Category A-Individual in Social Context and BSS Category B-Decision-making and Social Policy at the Societal Level - Course Expectations While all courses in the Behavioral and Social Sciences Area should fulfill the expectations listed below, courses proposed for BSS Category A-Individual in the Social Context and BSS Category B-Decision-making and Social Policy at the Societal Level must include expectations #1 and #2 below (see Appendix K1).

  1. An overview of the theories, characteristic methodologies, and the applicability of these methodologies to human, environmental, and social problems.

2. A wide range of human conditions and philosophical positions.

BSS Category C-History, Cross-cultural and Global Contexts - Course Expectations Courses proposed for BSS Category C-Historical, Cross-cultural, Ethnic, and Social Contexts must include: (see Appendix K2).

1. Cross-cultural and historical perspectives, which will provide students a critical understanding of the peoples of different cultures--past and present, western and non-western, and non-dominant, and a recognition of the uniqueness of individual cultures as well as the fundamental unity of humankind.

BSS Area Requirement (i.e. Category A, B and C Courses) - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix K3). While students should acquire knowledge and skills related to the learning outcomes listed below in each of the courses approved for the Behavioral and Social Sciences Area, they should be capable of demonstrating the following learning outcomes after completing the minimum 9-unit requirement for the Behavioral and Social Sciences Area.

1. Understanding basic concepts used to analyze human behavior in society as well as the interrelationships among the disciplines within the area.

2. Understanding basic methods of inquiry into human behavior and the criteria by which concepts, facts, generalizations, principles, and theories of the social and behavioral sciences are evaluated.

3. Appreciating other societies, cultures, and civilizations--past and present, western and non-western--in addition to their own.

G. GE Segment II: Behavioral and Social Sciences Area Committee Charge, Membership, Terms of Service, and Chair

1. Committee Charge: The Behavioral and Social Sciences Committee (BSS) will evaluate and recommend to the GEC course proposals for the Segment II BSS Area based on their adequacy in fulfilling the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for the BBS Category for which they were submitted. The BSS Committee's reasons for disapproval of courses will be stated in writing to the GEC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for BSS Area courses. At the request of the GEC, the GE Segment II BSS Committee shall periodically review the BSS Area course expectations and student learning outcomes to ensure their continued currency and adequacy for satisfying GE assessment requirements. The chair of the BSS Committee is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the GEC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations.

2. Committee Membership: Nine (9) Members. The GE BSS Committee shall be composed of the following nine members:

· Five representatives from the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences

· Two representatives from the College of Ethnic Studies

· One At-Large Representative: The Academic Senate will solicit nominees from among a pool of candidates from those colleges/areas not currently represented on the BSS Committee to include the colleges/areas of Business, Creative Arts, Education, Humanities, Health and Human Services, Science and Engineering, the Library and Student Affairs, but not from the colleges of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Ethnic Studies. The Academic Senate will conduct “At Large” elections and disseminate the election results to the GEC and to the deans/administrators for those “At Large” candidates elected by their respective colleges/areas.

· One Student Representative: The Academic Senate shall request from the President of the Associated Student government a student nominee to serve on the Segment II BSS Committee. The President of the Associated Students shall nominate/select a student to serve on the BSS Committee for a one-year term. The Academic Senate will forward the name of the student nominee to the GEC Chair by the fourth week of the fall semester of each academic year.

The Academic Senate shall notify college deans when there are Segment II BSS Committee vacancies in their colleges. College representatives shall be nominated and elected to the Segment II BSS Committee vacancies by faculty members in their respective colleges.

3. Committee Terms of Service: All terms are for three years and shall be staggered and rotated among the members, except for the student representative who will serve for one year.

4. Committee Chair: The chair shall be elected by the members of the BSS Committee.

H. GE Segment II: Lifelong Development (LLD) Requirement – 3-Units Minimum. At least 3-units in Segment II must be devoted to study that is designed to equip human beings for lifelong understanding and development of themselves as integrated physiological, social, and psychological entities. These 3-units can be met by completing a course in any of the three Segment II Areas that is designated as fulfilling the GE Segment II Lifelong Development (LLD) requirement.

GE Segment II: Lifelong Development - Course Expectations (see Appendix L1). The following course expectations have been developed by the GE Segment II LLD Committee. Courses proposed for GE Segment II LLD will be evaluated on the extent to which they meet the course expectations specified below. GE Segment II Lifelong Development courses must:

1. Address the physiological, social, and psychological aspects of self. Each course will address itself to some aspect of the three, and show interrelatedness among the three. A course’s content might include the study of “human behavior, sexuality, nutrition, health, stress, key relationships of humankind to the social and physical environment, and the implications of death and dying.” (CSU System GE Breadth Requirements, Executive Order 595).

2. Relate both to students’ current development as human beings and also to their life situations in the years to come.

3. Analyze information and theories, and provide opportunities to apply this knowledge.

GE Segment II: Lifelong Development - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix L2). After completion of a course designated as fulfilling the GE Segment II LLD requirement, students should be capable of:

1. Integrating information, theories, and experiences gained from the course to themselves as physiological, social, and psychological beings.

2. Applying the knowledge gained to their current and future life experiences.

I. GE Segment II: Lifelong Development Requirement Committee Charge, Membership, Terms of Service, and Chair.

1. Committee Charge: The GE Segment II Lifelong Development (LLD) Committee will evaluate and recommend to the GEC courses already accepted by the various GE Segment II Area Committees based on their adequacy in fulfilling LLD course expectations and student learning outcomes. The LLD Committee's reasons for disapproval of courses will be stated in writing to the GEC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for LLD courses. At the request of the GEC, the GE Segment II LLD Committee shall periodically review the course expectations and student learning outcomes for Segment II LLD courses to ensure their continued currency and adequacy for satisfying GE assessment requirements. The chair of the LLD Committee is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the GEC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations.

2. Committee Membership: Ten (10) Members. The LLD Committee shall be composed of the following ten members:

· One representative from the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences

· One representative from the College of Creative Arts

· One representative from the College of Education

· One representative from the College of Ethnic Studies

· One representative from the College of Health and Human Services

· One representative from the College of Humanities

· One representative from the College of Science and Engineering

· Two At-Large Representatives: The Academic Senate will solicit nominees from among a pool of candidates from those colleges/areas not currently represented on this committee to include the areas of the Library and Student Affairs; but not from the colleges of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Business, Creative Arts, Education, Ethnic Studies, Health and Human Services, Humanities, or Science and Engineering. The Academic Senate will conduct “At Large” elections and disseminate the results to the GEC and to the administrators for those “At Large” candidates elected by their respective areas.

· One Student Representative: The Academic Senate shall request from the President of the Associated Student government a student nominee to serve on the LLD Committee. The President of the Associated Students shall nominate/select a student to serve on the LLD Committee for a one-year term. The Academic Senate will forward the name of the student nominee to the GEC Chair by the fourth week of the fall semester of each academic year.

The Academic Senate shall notify college deans when there are Segment II LLD Committee vacancies in their colleges. College representatives shall be nominated and elected to the Segment II LLD Committee vacancies by faculty members in their respective colleges.

3. Committee Terms of Service: All terms are for three years and shall be staggered and rotated among the members, except for the student representative who will serve for one year.

4. Committee Chair: The chair will be elected by members of the Lifelong Development Committee.

J. Criteria and Guidelines for Submitting and Reviewing Courses for GE Segment II Lifelong Development Requirement (LLD). When submitting new or existing GE courses for review by the GE Segment II Lifelong Development Committee, departments must:

1. Receive the approval of the University Course Review Committee (CRC) and a GE Segment II Area Committee first. Courses that are not approved by the University Course Review Committee can not receive LLD certification.

2. Courses submitted for GE Segment II LLD must also be approved by the designated GE Segment II Committees for the Areas of the Physical and Biological Sciences (PBS), the Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSS), and the Humanities and Creative Arts (HCA). Courses that are not approved by one of the Segment II Area Committees can not receive LLD certification.

  1. Submit to the Office of Undergraduate Studies for transmittal to the LLD Committee a copy of the approved course proposal form, a current course syllabus, a completed Course Expectations Matrix, and a completed Student Learning Outcomes Matrix (see Appendices L1 and L2) for each proposed course. The Course Expectations Matrix should specify the methods by which the course expectations will be met. The Student Learning Outcomes Matrix will specify the methods by which the student learning outcomes will be met and the assessment methods used to evaluate the achievement of the student learning outcomes. Segment II LLD course proposals must be prepared and submitted in accordance with those submission requirements and guidelines that may be developed by the GEC in consultation with the GE Segment II LLD Committee and in accordance with procedures contained in this policy and its appendices (see Appendices F and G).

K. Assessment of GE Segment II - LLD Courses. Courses will be evaluated for inclusion in Segment II LLD on the extent to which they meet the stated course expectations (see Appendix L1) and student learning outcomes (see Appendix L2) specified for LLD courses. The roles and responsibilities of each of the parties to the GE program assessment processes are outlined in Appendix G: GE Program Assessment Plan, Roles, and Responsibilities.

 

L. GE Segment II: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) Requirement - 3-Units Minimum. All native SFSU students must complete at least 3-units of approved instruction in a course designated as fulfilling the American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) requirement.

GE Segment II: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Requirement - Course Expectations (see Appendix M1). The following course expectations have been developed by the GE Segment II AERM Committee. Courses proposed for GE Segment II AERM will be evaluated on the extent to which they meet the course expectations for AERM courses as specified below. Courses approved for the American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Requirement should:

1. Present views of one or more groups of American Ethnic and Racial Minorities* both from the perspective of the group and as an integral part of American society.

2. Encourage the study of values, attitudes, behaviors and/or creative endeavors that acknowledge and respect the dignity of all groups.

3. Present a thorough analysis of the historical experiences, social stratification processes, political activism, basic cultural patterns, aesthetic experiences and/or ideologies, and include one or more of the historically oppressed groups of color: African American, American Indian, Asian Pacific Islander American, and Latino American.

*American ethnic and racial minorities are defined as those people who:

· Have identified with or seen themselves as members of a distinct ethnic or racial minority group; and

· Have been identified by others as members of that group and as such, have been systematically oppressed by the dominant society's institutions and ideologies; and

· Have or had been excluded from sustained influence on, access to, and participation in the structures and institutions in the United States and the privilege of power deriving from such.

While "people of color" are understood to be the most obvious candidates for inclusion, this set of criteria is NOT intended to exclude others insofar as they meet the above definition. Courses from across the campus may be formulated or reformulated to satisfy the course expectations above and student learning outcomes delineated below to meet the AERM criteria.

GE Segment II: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Requirement - Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix M2). After completing a GE Segment II course designated as fulfilling the American Ethnic and Racial Minorities requirement, students will be capable of applying scholarship in the study of American Ethnic and Racial Minorities and will be capable of demonstrating at least two of the following learning outcomes:

  1. Identifying the ways in which the historical, political, and/or cultural and aesthetic experiences of different ethnic/racial minority groups are similar to and different from each other.
  2. Identifying their value systems and/or styles of creative expression and those of other ethnic and racial groups.
  3. Developing the understandings and behavioral competencies necessary for effective interpersonal and inter-ethnic group interactions such as the following :

a. Recognizing the diversity of attitudes and values which are projected in verbal and nonverbal behavior.

b. Recognizing the dynamics of interpersonal interactions from others' perspectives.

c. Identifying and recognizing the concerns regarding ethnic and racial minority stereotypes.

d. Recognizing the dynamics of racial hierarchies and power relations from others' perspectives.

  1. Developing their social and cultural participation skills, decision-making abilities, and political awareness in order to be citizens in an ethnically and racially diverse nation.

M. GE Segment II: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Committee Charge, Membership, Terms of Service, and Chair.

1. Committee Charge: The GE Segment II American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) Committee will evaluate and recommend to the GEC courses that already have been approved by one or more of the GE Segment II Area Committees for their adequacy in fulfilling AERM course expectations and student learning outcomes. The AERM Committee's reasons for disapproval of courses will be stated in writing to the GEC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for AERM courses. At the request of the GEC, the GE Segment II AERM Committee shall periodically review the course expectations and student learning outcomes for Segment II AERM courses to ensure their continued currency and adequacy for satisfying GE assessment requirements. The chair of the AERM Committee is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the GEC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations.

2. Committee Membership: Eight (8) Members: The AERM Committee shall be composed of the following eight members:

· Four representatives from the College of Ethnic Studies.

· One representative from the Colleges of Humanities and Creative Arts (This position alternates three year terms between the two colleges).

· One representative from the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences.

· One At-Large Representative: The Academic Senate will solicit nominees from among a pool of candidates from those colleges/areas not currently represented on this committee to include the colleges/areas of Business, Education, Health and Human Services, Science and Engineering, the Library, and Student Affairs; but not from the colleges of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Creative Arts, Ethnic Studies, or Humanities. The Academic Senate will conduct “At Large” elections and disseminate the election results to the GEC and to deans/administrators for those “At Large” candidates elected by their respective colleges/areas.

· One Student Representative: The Academic Senate shall request from the President of the Associated Student government a student nominee to serve on the AERM Committee. The President of the Associated Students shall nominate/select a student to serve on the AERM Committee for a one-year term. The Academic Senate will forward the name of the student nominee to the GEC Chair by the fourth week of the fall semester of each academic year.

The Academic Senate shall notify college deans when there are Segment II AERM Committee vacancies in their colleges. College representatives shall be nominated and elected to Segment II AERM Committee vacancies by faculty members in their respective colleges.

3. Committee Terms of Service: All terms are for three years and shall be rotated and staggered among the members, except for the student representative who will serve for one year.

4. Committee Chair: The chair will be elected by members of the American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Committee.

N. Criteria and Guidelines for the Submitting and Reviewing Courses for the AERM Requirement. When submitting new or existing GE courses for Segment II AERM review, departments must:

1) Receive the approval of the University Course Review Committee and a Segment II Area Committee first. Courses that are not approved by the University Course Review Committee will not be reviewed for AERM certification.

2) Courses submitted for GE Segment II AERM must also be approved by the designated GE Segment II Committees for the Areas of the Physical and Biological Sciences (PBS), the Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSS), and the Humanities and Creative Arts (HCA). Courses that are not approved by one of the Segment II Area Committees can not receive AERM certification.

3) Submit to the Office of Undergraduate Studies for transmittal to the AERM Committee a copy of the approved course proposal form, a current course syllabus, a completed Course Expectations Matrix, and a completed Student Learning Outcomes Matrix (see Appendices M1 and M2) for each proposed course. The Course Expectations Matrix should specify the methods by which the course expectations will be met. The Student Learning Outcomes Matrix should specify the methods by which the student learning outcomes will be met and the assessment methods used to evaluate the achievement of the student learning outcomes.

4) Segment II AERM course proposals must be prepared and submitted in accordance with those submission requirements and guidelines that may be developed by the GEC in consultation with the GE Segment II AERM Committee and in accordance with procedures contained in this policy and its appendices (see Appendices F and G).

O. Assessment of GE Segment II AERM Courses: Courses will be evaluated for inclusion in AERM on the extent to which they meet 1) the stated course expectations and 2) student learning outcomes specified for AERM courses. The roles and responsibilities of each of the parties to the GE course and program assessment processes are outlined in Appendix G: GE Program Assessment Plan, Roles, and Responsibilities. GE Segment II AERM courses will be assessed on the extent to which they meet 1) the Segment II AERM course expectations contained in Appendix M1: GE Segment II AERM Course Expectations Matrices and 2) the Segment II AERM student learning outcomes contained in Appendix M2: GE Segment II AERM Student Learning Outcomes Matrices.

P. Segment II Criteria and Guidelines for the Preparation, Submission and Review of GE Segment II Course Proposals: The following quotas, criteria and guidelines are included to assist faculty members, department chairs and college deans in the preparation, submission and review of course proposals for GE Segment II.

Q. GE Segment II: College Course Quotas and Limitations

1. A college may offer in each of the three Segment II Areas (PBS, BSS, and HCA) no more than 20 courses, or up to four times the number of undergraduate departments and baccalaureate degree-granting programs in the college, whichever is larger. NEXA courses shall not be counted as part of the college quotas.

2. If the number of courses contained in the college submission packet exceeds the maximum allowed under #1 above, an alternate list must be included in which course proposals beyond the maximum are ranked in order of preference. If college course proposals are disapproved, the alternate proposals will be considered by the appropriate Segment II Area Committees in order of their rank on the alternate list.

3. Each Segment II Area Committee may also approve at its discretion a maximum of six courses in its respective Area above the limits specified in #1 above. The purpose of this exception to the limitations included in #1 above is to provide an independent channel for bringing new courses into the GE Segment II curriculum, particularly courses which would not originate in a college.

4. For the GE Segment II Humanities and Creative Arts Area, Category D, Active Creative Participation, any program on campus may propose an unlimited number of courses for this category which have an "activity" classification (K-factor) provided they have no prerequisites other than approved Segment I and II courses. This provision is an exception to the course limitation maxima specified in #1 above.

  1. For the GE Segment II, Humanities and Creative Arts, Category E, Languages Other than English, courses offered by SFSU are automatically included in HCA Category E provided they meet the following two criteria:

 

a. A language other than English is used in the teaching of the course, and

b. The course content focuses on learning such a language, including studies of cultural and literary products in that language.

 

Courses that are taught in English and for which the readings are in English are prohibited from counting in HCA Category E.

 

This provision is an exception to the course limitation maxima specified in #1 above. Courses in HCA Category E that are approved for GE credit will be listed in the GE Program section of the University Bulletin and designated as [GE] approved in the Class Schedule.

 

  1. PBS Categories A and B laboratory and field courses paired with lecture discussion courses shall not be counted as part of the GE course quota for the college proposing the lab/field courses. This provision is an exception to the course limitation maxima specified in #1 above.

R. GE Segment II: Course Submission, Review, and Appeal Processes

1. Each college will submit its complete course submission packet to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. The dean will forward the course submissions to the appropriate Segment II Area (PBS, BSS, and HCA) and Overlay Committees (AERM and LLD) for their review and recommendations and to the GEC. Departments and programs may not propose courses directly to a GE Segment II Area or Overlay Committees. See Appendix F: GE Segments I and II Course Submission, Review, and Appeal Procedures and Appendix G: GE Program Assessment Plans, Roles, and Responsibilities for an overview and detailed description of the roles and responsibilities of the various participants in the GE curricular review and assessment processes. GE Segment II courses will be assessed on the extent to which they meet 1) the Segment II course expectations contained in Appendices H1-M1, GE Segment II Course Expectations Matrices, and 2) the GE Segment II student learning outcomes contained in Appendices H2-M2, GE Segment II Student Learning Outcomes Matrices. College deans and department chairs who wish to make minor additions or deletions to their currently approved set of GE Segment II courses outside of the regularly scheduled, official Segment II course review channels must use the form included in Appendix N: Segment II Course Substitution/Addition Form for this purpose. When using this process, deans and department chairs must give careful attention to the Segment II college course quota policies and course limitation exceptions listed above.

S. GE Segment II: Course Proposal Criteria and Guidelines for Faculty, Chairs, and Deans: The criteria listed below must be addressed by all participants in the GE Segment II course review process. The SFSU faculty has ultimate responsibility for determining and assuring the quality of the GE curriculum and the suitability of individual courses for GE certification. College deans are responsible for managing GE resource allocations, for monitoring the regularity of GE course offerings, and for working closely with their faculty members to assure the overall quality of their GE course offerings. Each GE Segment II course proposal will be carefully assessed by the GE Segment II Area and Overlay Committees for consistency with the following criteria and guidelines.

  1. Are the proposed GE Segment II course expectations and student learning outcomes clearly consistent with the course expectations and student learning outcomes specified for the GE Segment II Area for which the course is proposed? (See Appendices H1-M1, GE Segment II Course Expectations Matrices, and Appendices H2-M2, GE Segment II Student Learning Outcomes Matrices.)
  2. Do the proposed GE Segment II course assessment methods (papers, quizzes, exams, presentations, etc.) clearly demonstrate that students will fulfill the student learning outcomes specified for the GE Segment II Area for which the course is proposed?
  3. Will the course be offered at least once each year in accordance with this GE Segment II policy?
  4. Do course prerequisites present significant enrollment barriers for the general student population? (See GE Course Prerequisite Policy in Section II of this policy.)
  5. Do proposed GE Segment II courses that give enrollment preference to majors clearly state this preference in the course syllabus, the University Bulletin, and the Class Schedule? (See GE Course Enrollment Policy in Section II of this policy.)
  6. Have all proposed GE Segment II courses that are currently approved for both Segments II and III of our GE program been reviewed to ensure that they clearly satisfy the course expectations and student learning outcomes for both Segments II and III?
  7. Do all proposed GE Segment II courses include multicultural perspectives as appropriate to their respective disciplines in accordance with this GE Segment II policy?
  8. Does the number of proposed GE Segment II courses included in a college’s final submission packet exceed the maximum course quotas permitted by this Segment II policy for the college? (See the Segment II Course Quota policy above.) If so, an alternate course proposal list must be submitted that ranks the additional course proposals in order of preference. If any of the course proposals submitted in the original college packet are disapproved, the alternate course proposals will be considered by the appropriate GE Segment II Area Committee in the order of their ranked preference on the alternate list. Courses submitted for HCA, Categories D and E are exempt from these college course quota limits. Separate PBS laboratory and field courses that are paired with PBS lecture/discussion courses are also exempt from these college course quota limits.

 

 

 

 

T. GE Segment II: Variable Topic Courses: When a variable topic course is proposed for GE Segment II offering, all variants of the course must satisfy the course expectations and student learning outcomes of the GE Segment II Area, Category, and Requirement(s) for which the variable topic course is proposed. In cases where all variants of a generic course do not meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes of the Segment II Area, Category, and Requirement(s) for which it is proposed, the department chair should either change the course number to a “stand alone” course or withdraw it from GE consideration. Only generic course titles will appear in the GE section of the University Bulletin and the Class Schedule.

U. Assessment of GE Segment II Courses: The roles and responsibilities of each of the parties to the GE course and program assessment processes are clearly delineated in Appendix G: GE Program Assessment Plans, Roles, and Responsibilities. GE Segment II courses will be assessed on the extent to which they meet 1) the Segment II course expectations contained in Appendices H1-M1, GE Segment II Course Expectation Matrices, and 2) the Segment II student learning outcomes contained in Appendices H2-M2, GE Segment II Student Learning Outcomes Matrices.

 

V. General Education Segment III – Relationships of Knowledge (see Appendix O: Segment III Exceptions for Upper Division Transfer Students)

A. Underlying Principles of the GE Segment III Requirements. Segment III is SFSU’s 9-unit, upper division general education residence requirement. This component of our program is designed to promote an appreciation of the interrelationships among knowledge, skills, and values. Students benefit from knowledge about:

· The value and significance of human achievements.

· The prevalence of personal, cultural, and/or procedural biases.

· The use of effective procedures for investigating problems and issues.

· The experiences and achievements of various cultural, ethnic, or social groups.

· The complexity of personal, ethical, social, and cultural problems and issues.

· The problems, issues, and experiences of different cultural, ethnic, or social groups and how they are often experienced by these groups in different ways.

· The integration of their abilities, knowledge, and experience in making decisions.

· The consequences of solutions on existing or newly created problems.

These goals are achieved by a thematic, internally cohesive, and interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary cluster of courses.

B. GE Segment III Cultural, Ethnic or Social Diversity Requirement: At least one course in Segment III must include as its central focus the development of awareness and understanding of Cultural, Ethnic, or Social Diversity (CESD). These courses may focus on the local, national, and/or global levels and the complexities presented by such diversity in the study of any given human issue or achievement. Courses must include some information on, or awareness of, the impact of the course content on the various socio-economic groups potentially affected by the issues or problems associated with the topics being studied. When appropriate, other courses approved for GE Segment III should also strive to include a cultural, ethnic, or social diversity dimension. Courses proposed for the GE Segment III CESD requirement should be grouped in a single Segment III cluster category whenever possible, so that students can not inadvertently fail to complete this requirement. Supplemental CESD course evaluation criteria are contained in Appendix P: CESD Supplemental Course Evaluation Criteria. These criteria should be carefully reviewed prior to submitting a course for CESD consideration.

C. Duplicate Use of GE Courses and Units Policy: No GE course can be used to fulfill more than one general education category, segment, or area. For example, students cannot use the same course to satisfy both a Segment II requirement and a Segment III requirement of the General Education program. Further, courses taken at SFSU to fulfill the U.S. History and Government requirement (6-units minimum) cannot be used to fulfill General Education requirements.

 

However, a maximum of 12 semester units, used in fulfillment of SFSU’s General Education requirements, may also be used in fulfillment of requirements for a major and/or program requirements as submitted on the approved Application for Graduation. This practice is referred to as “duplicate use.” While the duplicate use of GE courses and units may be used in fulfillment of both General Education requirements and requirements in a major, the units for these courses shall be counted only once toward fulfillment of the minimum units required for award of the baccalaureate degree (i.e. BA, BM or BS).

 

The following are additional rules governing duplicate use:

 

  1. A maximum of 6-units of the 9-unit GE Segment III, upper division requirement may be used in fulfillment of major requirements. Therefore, one course chosen in Segment III must be both outside the prefix of the major department and outside the major program presented in the Application for Graduation. Liberal Studies majors are exempt from this rule and may use 9-units of duplicate credit in GE Segment III.

 

  1. Engineering majors are exempt from the Duplicate Use of GE Courses and Units Policy (see Appendix A: General Education Requirements for Engineering Majors).

D. GE Segment III Cluster Expectations (see Appendix Q1): Clusters proposed for GE Segment III should include:

1. An internally cohesive theme which is highly significant in terms of human experience, achievements, or problems, past and/or present, and which compels an interdisciplinary perspective.

2. At least two significantly different disciplinary perspectives that integrate knowledge, experience, and abilities around the theme.

3. At least one Cultural, Ethnic, or Social Diversity (CESD) course that has as a central expectation that students develop an awareness, appreciation, and understanding of the diversity of human experience, values, and contributions, and of "the contributions to knowledge and civilization that have been made by members of various cultural groups and by women." Inherent in this requirement is the concept of cultural pluralism which embraces ethnic, cross-cultural, and intercultural studies as well as studies of the relationship between dominant and non-dominant social groups. Courses that fulfill this requirement should include a substantial consideration of cultures other than the Western European and North American, or a substantial consideration of non-dominant social groups in the U.S. Non-dominant social groups include, but are not limited to women, the aging, the disabled, lesbians and gays, and the poor as well as ethnic and racial groups who have been excluded from dominant social, economic, or political institutions. Courses meeting the CESD requirement should treat one or more such groups in relationship to the theme of the cluster (See Appendix P).

E. GE Segment III Course Expectations (see Appendix Q2). Courses proposed for GE Segment III must:

1. Be upper division courses.

2. Provide for discussion.

3. Include critical analysis and synthesis of topics and problems related to the cluster theme.

4. Include a writing assignment or assignments equaling at least ten (10), double-spaced, typed, pages of analytical writing evaluated on the basis of composition, style, syntax, grammar, and content by the instructor of record. The course syllabus must describe, in sufficient detail, the nature and scope of the writing assignment(s) and must identify the percentage of the total course grade allocated to each writing assignment. The writing assignment(s) should provide students with ample opportunities to practice and revise their writing and for thorough and demanding instructor critique of student writing. In-class written examinations do not satisfy the GE Segment III writing requirement. Take home written examinations are acceptable provided that adequate time and effort are devoted to the critical editing and revision of the writing assignments by the student.

F. GE Segment III Student Learning Outcomes (see Appendix Q3). After completion of the 9-unit GE Segment III upper division, residence requirement in a single cluster, students should be capable of:

 

1. Identifying interdisciplinary perspectives around a theme that focuses on human experiences, achievements, or problems, past and/or present.

2. Integrating knowledge, experience, and abilities around a theme from at least two different disciplinary perspectives.

3. Synthesizing information and engaging in critical analyses, including problem solving, decision making, investigating and/or evaluating the implications of an issue.

4. Engaging in critical analysis in classroom discussions and in writing assignments (minimum of ten, double-spaced pages).

5. Demonstrating an awareness and understanding of cultural, ethnic, or social diversity, whether local, national, or global, and the relationship of diversity to the cluster theme.

G. GE Segment III - Committee Charge, Membership, Terms of Service, and Chair.

1. Committee Charge: The Segment III Committee will evaluate and recommend course/cluster proposals for inclusion in GE Segment III based on their adequacy in meeting the stated cluster expectations, course expectations, and student learning outcomes specified for GE Segment III. The Segment III Committee's reasons for recommending disapproval of any Segment III course and/or cluster will be stated in writing to the GEC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated cluster expectations, course expectations, and student learning outcomes specified for Segment III courses. At the request of the GEC, the GE Segment III Committee shall periodically review the course expectations and student learning outcomes for Segment III courses/clusters to ensure their continued currency and adequacy to satisfy assessment requirements. The chair of the Segment III Committee is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the GEC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations.

2. Committee Membership: Twelve (12) Members. The Segment III Committee shall be composed of the following twelve members:

  • Eight representatives including one member from each of the following eight colleges: Behavioral and Social Sciences, Business, Creative Arts, Education, Ethnic Studies, Health and Human Services, and Science and Engineering.

· One At-Large Representative: The Academic Senate will solicit nominees from a pool of candidates from either the Library or Student Affairs in alternating three year term rotations. The Academic Senate will conduct “At Large” elections and disseminate the election results to the GEC and to the appropriate administrator for those “At Large” candidates nominated by their respective areas.

· One representative from the University Interdisciplinary Council (UIC)

· One Student Representative: The Associated Students shall nominate/select a student to serve on the Segment III Committee for a one-year term. The Academic Senate shall request a student nominee to serve on the GE Segment III Committee from the President of the Associated Student government. The Academic Senate will forward the name of the Segment III student nominee to the GEC Chair at the beginning of each academic year.

· The Dean of Undergraduate Studies, or his designee, as an ex-officio member.

The Academic Senate shall notify college deans when there are GE Segment III Committee vacancies in their colleges. College representatives shall be nominated and elected to the Segment III Committee by faculty members in their respective colleges.

3. Committee Terms of Service: All terms are for three years and shall be staggered and rotated among the members, except for the student representative who will serve for one year.

 

4. Committee Chair: The chair will be elected by the members of the GE Segment III Committee.

H. GE Segment III Committee Responsibilities: Members of the GE Segment III Committee are responsible for the following functions:

1. Recommending approval/disapproval to the General Education Council (GEC) of new and revised course/cluster proposals based on their adequacy in meeting the specified Segment III cluster expectations, course expectations, and student learning outcomes.

2. Ensuring that all approved and proposed Segment III courses/clusters continue to meet the current cluster expectations, course expectations, and student learning outcomes specified in this Segment III policy.

3. Requesting consultation with cluster faculty concerning the review of clusters and/or courses that consistently fail to meet the cluster expectations, course expectations, and student learning outcomes for Segment III.

4. Recommending to the GEC in writing its reasons for requesting deletion of clusters or courses that consistently fail to meet the cluster expectations, course expectations, and student learning outcomes for Segment III after consulting with all involved parties.

5. Recommending to the GEC in writing the merger of clusters with closely related themes after consultation with cluster faculty.

6. Recommending to the GEC the approval/disapproval of proposed minor revisions to currently approved Segment III courses/clusters.

7. Recommending to the GEC in writing the development of new clusters when important thematic topics are not adequately represented in our GE Segment III curriculum.

8. Reviewing proposals for new clusters every two years, beginning in fall, 1988.

9. Reviewing proposals for minor revisions to existing clusters on a continuous basis.

10. Working closely with the GEC and the Dean of Undergraduate Studies to ensure cluster coordination and accessibility (including time of day offerings), and the identification and resolution of persistent Segment III problems and issues including student access to cluster courses.

11. Implementing the approved assessment plan for evaluating GE Segment III courses/clusters as well as the overall effectiveness of Segment III in meeting its stated cluster and course expectations and student learning outcomes (see Appendix G).

12. Recommending changes in Segment III policy to the GEC.

I. Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting GE Segment III Course/Cluster Proposals (see Appendix R: Segment III Submission, Review, Approval, and Appeals Processes)

1. Course/Cluster Proposals: Segment III course/cluster proposals must show how the cluster as a whole fulfills the Segment III cluster expectations as well as the guidelines included in this section. Required cluster materials, including the Cluster Expectations Matrix, the Course Expectations Matrix, the Student Learning Outcomes Matrix (see Appendices Q1, Q2, and Q3), and the course syllabi must be sufficiently explicit and include adequate detail to show clearly how each course contributes to the fulfillment of the specified cluster expectations. When the requirements for the cluster provide students with alternative combinations of courses, the justification for the cluster must demonstrate that any acceptable combination of courses meets all the Segment III course expectations and student learning outcomes. Faculty members who wish to make minor revisions to a currently approved Segment III cluster outside of the regularly scheduled, official cluster review process (e.g. add a course, delete a course, request CESD, etc.) should use the form intended for this purpose included in Appendix S: Segment III Minor Cluster Revision Form.

2. Clusters and Courses: The following factors must be considered when submitting a new or substantially revised cluster proposal for review.

a. Low-enrollment clusters: Clusters chosen by less than 1 percent of undergraduates who earn the baccalaureate in a given academic year shall be selected for review by the Segment III Committee. If such clusters can not be suitably revised and continue to draw less than 1 percent of earned baccalaureates, they may be recommended to the GEC for consideration for deletion from Segment III.

b. Implementation of the CESD Requirement: Student completion of the Cultural, Ethnic, or Social Diversity requirement (CESD) must follow logically from the specific requirements for completing the cluster. The specific cluster requirements must direct student to complete at least one CESD course, or a discrete grouping of courses (e.g. a specific Category), all of which have been approved for the CESD requirement (see Appendix P).

c. Cluster Coordination: Each cluster must have a faculty coordinator who is responsible for the cluster and for communications concerning the cluster (see Appendix T: Cluster Coordinator Responsibilities for a comprehensive listing of coordinator responsibilities). The following is a partial listing of the most essential cluster coordinator responsibilities.

· Submit the annual, one-page cluster report (see Appendix U: Segment III Annual Report Form).

· Prepare, coordinate and submit cluster/course proposals for revision as needed, required, or requested by the Segment III Committee or the GEC.

· Prepare and send a Segment III Cover Sheet to cluster faculty members that includes: 1) the policy requirements that apply to all Segment III clusters 2) the cluster theme, 3) the specific cluster requirements, 4) a listing of the cluster courses and descriptions, and 5) the current contact information for the cluster coordinator (see Appendix V: Sample Cover Sheet for Segment III Clusters).

· Inform his/her department chair and college dean, chair of the GEC, chair of the Segment III Committee, and the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, if she/he is unable to continue to serve as coordinator.

d. College Deans’ Responsibilities: The dean of the college in which the cluster coordinator resides, in consultation with cluster faculty members and the deans of colleges with courses in the Segment III cluster, is responsible for appointing a new cluster coordinator and informing the GEC Chair, the Segment III Committee Chair, and the Dean of Undergraduate Studies of all cluster coordinator changes. College deans are also responsible for signing cluster proposals that include courses in their colleges. A signed cluster proposal certifies agreement by college deans to offer those courses included in the cluster proposal that are in their colleges at least once each year (see Appendix W: Cluster Review and Approval Form).

3. Variable Topic Courses: All variable topics of a proposed GE Segment III generic course must be consistent with the cluster theme and/or cluster category title and must meet the specified GE Segment III course expectations and student learning outcomes. When a generic course is approved for GE Segment III, all variable topics of that course must be approved and must be consistent with the cluster theme and/or cluster category title for which it is proposed. In cases where all variants of a generic course are not consistent with the cluster theme and/or cluster category title for which it is proposed and do not meet the specific course expectations and student learning outcomes for the cluster course, the department chair should either change the course number to a “stand alone” course, or withdraw it from GE Segment III consideration. Only generic course titles will appear in the GE program sections of the University Bulletin and the Class Schedule.

4. Frequency of Course Offerings: When submitting a new or existing cluster for review, cluster courses will be evaluated in accordance with the following policies and requirements.

a) Once-a-Year Rule: Each course in a cluster must be taught at least once in each academic year. “Taught” is defined as a listing in the University’s official 4th week Census Report (see Appendix U). An exception may be made when the sole instructor of a cluster course plans to be on leave for a full year; in this case, the instructor or the department chair should inform the cluster coordinator and the Segment III Committee Chair at least one semester in advance of the expected leave. Also, exceptions to the once-a-year rule may be made when the sole instructor of a cluster course has an extended illness and the cluster coordinator requests the exception. NEXA is exempted from this rule.

b) Course Offering Plans: Each cluster proposal shall include a Course Offering Plan for each cluster course, when it is initially reviewed for approval or when it is scheduled for an official periodic review. The Cluster Offering Plan must adhere to these requirements. The deans of colleges and department chairs that offer courses in the cluster must indicate their agreement to offer the cluster courses by signing the Cluster Review and Approval Form (see Appendix W). The Cluster Offering Plan shall show the planned frequency and pattern of offering (i.e. fall and spring, fall only, spring only, etc.) for all courses in the cluster.

J. Review and Assessment of Segment III Cluster/Course Offerings: Courses and clusters will be evaluated for inclusion in GE Segment III on the extent to which they meet 1) the cluster expectations, 2) the course expectations, and 3) the student learning outcomes specified for GE Segment III clusters/courses (see Appendices Q1, Q2, and Q3). When Segment III clusters are scheduled for formal review by the GEC and the Segment III Committee, cluster coordinators should prepare their cluster review materials in accordance with submission requirements included in Appendix X: Segment III Cluster Submission Guidelines. The University’s comprehensive plan for assessing the GE program and curricula is included in Appendix G: GE Program Assessment Plan, Roles, and Responsibilities. The Segment III Committee will be responsible for participating in the development of evaluation procedures for the assessment of GE Segment III clusters/courses that are consistent with the assessment plan included in Appendix G.

VI. GE Program Administration and Implementation

A. The General Education Council (GEC) Charge, Membership, Terms of Service, and Chair.

1. GEC Charge: The General Education Council (GEC) will be responsible for developing, reviewing, approving, and disseminating the policies, principles, procedures, and guidelines that govern SFSU’s General Education program. An academic review of the program will be conducted every five years in accordance with the guidelines established by the CSU Trustees for academic program review and with SFSU’s GE Assessment Plan, Roles, and Responsibilities (see Appendix G). The GEC will respond to, and initiate adjustments in, program principles, course expectations, student learning outcomes, and the program curriculum as changing times and needs indicate. The GEC will submit its decisions and recommendations to the Educational Policies Council, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Upon final approval, the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, in cooperation with the GEC, will facilitate the implementation of program policies, procedures, guidelines, and agreed upon curricular adjustments and will assure that all areas within Segments I, II, and III of the GE program are responsibly and adequately represented. The GEC will:

· Oversee all GE policy development, program review, course review and approval, and the implementation and dissemination of GE polices and procedures.

· Recommend GE policies to the Educational Policies Committee.

· Monitor and review recommendations and reports made by the established GE sub-committees.

· Act as a board of appeals on all GE policy and procedural matters.

· Act as the final faculty GE curriculum committee for review of GE course and cluster proposals and make its recommendations through the Dean of Undergraduate Studies to the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs, and to the Educational Policies Committee.

· Request data, reports, and information from the Dean of Undergraduate Studies regarding all aspects of GE program implementation.

· Review recommendations and reports submitted by the college General Education Advising Coordinators.

2. General Education Council Membership: Twelve (12) Members. The General Education Council shall be composed of the following twelve members.

 

· Eight representatives: one from each the eight colleges: Behavioral and Social Sciences, Business, Creative Arts, Education, Ethnic Studies, Health and Human Services, Humanities, and Science and Engineering.

· One representative from the Library. The Academic Senate will solicit a pool of qualified nominees from the Library. The Academic Senate will conduct elections for the library and will disseminate the election results to the GEC and to the administrator of the Library.

· One representative from the Student Affairs area. The Academic Senate will solicit a pool of qualified nominees from the area of Student Affairs. The Academic Senate will conduct elections for this area and will disseminate the election results to the GEC and to the administrator of this area.

· One Student Representative: The Academic Senate shall request from the President of the Associated Student government a student nominee to serve on the GEC for a one-year term. The Associated Students shall nominate/select a student to serve on the GEC for a one-year term. The Academic Senate will forward the name of the student nominee to the GEC Chair by the fourth week of the fall semester of each academic year.

· One representative appointed by the Educational Policies Council to serve as liaison to the GEC for a one-year term.

 

3. GEC Terms of Service: All terms are for three years and shall be staggered and rotated among the members, except for the AS student representative and the EPC representative who shall serve for one year.

4. GEC Chair: The GEC Chair shall be elected by the members of the General Education Council.

B. General Education Council’s Roles and Responsibilities in the Assessment of GE Courses/Clusters and Overall Program Effectiveness The GEC is responsible for:

  1. Reviewing the written GE assessment reports, recommendations, and analyses of the established GE sub-committees.
  2. Assessing the adequacy of institutional program support.
  3. Requesting additional information to assist in the program evaluation process.
  4. Making recommendations to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies and to the Academic Senate and on GE assessment activities and results.
  5. Working with the established GE sub-committees to provide feedback to all departments and colleges.
  6. Acknowledging successful programs.
  7. Initiating discussions with departments to facilitate any curricular improvements if necessary.

 

In cases of the persistent failure to meet GE course expectations or GE student learning outcomes, or to respond to GEC and/or GE sub-committee requests for information, the GEC may delete specific courses and/or clusters from the GE program.

 

The GEC will encourage the faculty to use the results of the GE assessment process to make curricular changes that foster the improvement, currency, and effectiveness of student learning at SFSU through its general education program. The GEC will recommend the deletion from GE of any course or cluster that consistently fails to meet GE cluster expectations, course expectations or student learning outcomes.

C. GE Appeal Policy and Procedures: The following GE appeal policy and procedures apply to all GE policies and procedures set forth in this policy (see Appendix F and Appendix G).

1. Faculty members are entitled to appeal the recommendation of any established general education committee to the General Education Council, on either substantive or procedural grounds.

2. Appeals must be filed with the chairperson of the General Education Council within one month of receipt of notification of a GEC decision, or an established GE sub-committee recommendation.

3. Appeal of a GE sub-committee recommendation, or an action of the General Education Council, may include consultation and negotiation, submission of additional justification in writing, and/or presentation and discussion at a scheduled formal hearing scheduled by the GEC. Faculty filing appeals shall be notified of the date and time of the GEC hearing at which their appeal is to be considered and shall be invited to present their case.

4. The General Education Council must reach decisions on formal appeals within two months of their filing. The appeal decisions of the General Education Council are recommendations to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

5. Appeal time periods specified in this section shall not include holiday periods, scheduled examination periods, intersession, summer session, or unscheduled campus closings.

***APPROVED B by the ACADEMIC SENATE at its meeting on April 27, 2005***