Amendments to the Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees, Majors, Concentrations, Minors, and Certificates

Reference Number: S15-255
Senate Approval Date: Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees,
Majors, Concentrations, Minors, and Certificates

Academic Senate Policy #S15-255

(Formerly #F13-255)

The following changes have been made to the original policy:

  • The C2/C3 labels for Humanities and Humanities: Literature were switched to be consistent with community college designations (January 17, 2014)
  • The structures of the LDCC and UDCC were modified to require two representatives from each College (October 13, 2013)
  • A minimum grade requirement in Area A and B4 of CR or C- or better to fulfill General Education requirements was added (November 22, 2013). This supersedes the course expectation that Area A courses be graded ABC/NC.
  • Since the Liberal Studies program is housed in LCA and no longer within the Division of Undergraduate Studies, no separate Liberal Studies representative will be elected to BRC

 

Table of Contents

I.  Introduction...................................................................................................................................................................... 3

II.  General Education and other requirements common to all Baccalaureate Degrees      4

A.    Methods of satisfying general education and other degree requirements................................. 5

1      Overlays..................................................................................................................................................................... 5

2.     Unlimited Double Counting.................................................................................................................................. 5

3.     Transfer Students..................................................................................................................................................... 5

B.    General Education Requirements..................................................................................................................... 5

Table 1, General Education Requirements of all baccalaureate degrees............................................................ 6

C.    Structure for Upper-Division General Education...................................................................................... 6

1.     Topical Perspectives Option................................................................................................................................. 6

2.     Integrated Studies Option...................................................................................................................................... 7

3.     Study Abroad Option.............................................................................................................................................. 8

D.    American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Requirement............................................................................. 8

E.    Environmental Sustainability Requirement............................................................................................... 8

F.     Global Perspectives Requirement..................................................................................................................... 8

G.    Social Justice Requirement................................................................................................................................... 8

H.    Minimum Grade-point Average Requirement................................................................................................ 9

I.     Residency Requirement........................................................................................................................................... 9

J.     Minimum Credit-hour Requirement................................................................................................................... 9

K.    Minimum Upper-division Credit-hour Requirement.................................................................................... 9

L.    Written English Requirements........................................................................................................................... 9

III.  Majors.................................................................................................................................................................................. 9

A.    Requirements and restrictions of all majors.............................................................................................. 9

1.     Educational Goals.................................................................................................................................................. 9

2.     Prerequisites............................................................................................................................................................. 9

3.     Lower Division Classes........................................................................................................................................ 10

4.     Writing in the Major............................................................................................................................................. 10

5.     Technology Related to the Major...................................................................................................................... 10

6.     High Impact Educational Practices.................................................................................................................. 10

7.     Flexibility and Advising...................................................................................................................................... 10

8.     Culminating Experiences.................................................................................................................................... 10

B.    Requirements and restrictions specific to Bachelor of Science degree programs.................. 11

1.     Minimum and maximum number of units.......................................................................................................... 11

C.    Requirements and restrictions specific to Bachelor of Music degree programs..................... 11

1.     Minimum and Maximum number of units......................................................................................................... 11

D.    Requirements and restrictions specific to Bachelor of Arts degree programs........................ 11

1.     Minimum and maximum number of units.......................................................................................................... 11

2.     Complementary Studies Requirement for Majors in BA degree programs................................................ 12

 

IV.  Minors................................................................................................................................................................................. 12

A.    Definition of Minors............................................................................................................................................. 12

B.    Prerequisites.......................................................................................................................................................... 12

C.    Criteria for Minors............................................................................................................................................... 13

V.  Certificates.................................................................................................................................................................... 13

A.    Definition of Undergraduate Certificates........................................................................................................ 13

B.    Prerequisites.......................................................................................................................................................... 14

C.    Criteria for Undergraduate Certificates.......................................................................................................... 14

VI.  Oversight and Approval Process for Baccalaureate degrees, majors, concentrations, minors, and certificates........................................................................................................................................................ 15

A.    Oversight and Approval Process for University-Wide Requirements............................................ 15

1.     Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC).............................................................................................. 15

a.     Committee Charge.............................................................................................................................................. 15

b.     Committee Membership..................................................................................................................................... 16

c.     Quorum.............................................................................................................................................................. 16

d.     BRC Terms of Service....................................................................................................................................... 17

e.     Committee Chair................................................................................................................................................ 17

f.      BRC and the Academic Senate........................................................................................................................... 17

2.     Initial Certification Committees........................................................................................................................ 17

a.     Committee Charge.............................................................................................................................................. 17

b.     Review of Committee Recommendations........................................................................................................... 18

c.     Committee Membership..................................................................................................................................... 18

d.     Committee Terms of Service.............................................................................................................................. 18

e.     Committee Chairs............................................................................................................................................... 18

f.      Meeting times..................................................................................................................................................... 18

g.     BRC representative............................................................................................................................................ 19

3.     Lower Division Certification Committee (LDCC)........................................................................................... 19

a.     Committee Charge.............................................................................................................................................. 19

b.     Committee Membership..................................................................................................................................... 19

c.     Quorum.............................................................................................................................................................. 19

d.     Committee Terms of Service.............................................................................................................................. 19

e.     Committee Chair................................................................................................................................................ 20

f.      Lower Division Certification Committee Responsibilities.................................................................................. 20

4.     Upper Division Certification Committee (UDCC).......................................................................................... 20

a.     Committee Charge.............................................................................................................................................. 20

b.     Committee Membership..................................................................................................................................... 21

c.     Quorum.............................................................................................................................................................. 21

d.     Committee Terms of Service.............................................................................................................................. 21

e.     Committee Chair................................................................................................................................................ 21

f.      Upper Division Certification Committee Responsibilities.................................................................................. 21

5.     Director of General Education........................................................................................................................... 22

B.    Oversight and Approval Process for Major/Concentration Programs......................................... 22

1.     General Procedures for Proposing Major and Concentration Programs................................................. 22

2.     General Procedures for Proposing Revisions to Major and Concentration Programs.......................... 22

3.     Procedures for Proposing Interdisciplinary Majors and Concentrations................................................ 23

C.    Oversight and Approval Process for Minor Programs........................................................................... 24

1.     General Procedures for Proposing Minors...................................................................................................... 24

2.     Procedures for Proposing Interdisciplinary Minors...................................................................................... 25

D.    Oversight and Approval Process for Certificate Programs............................................................... 25

1.     General Procedures for Proposing Undergraduate Certificates................................................................ 26

2.     Procedures for Proposing Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Certificates................................................ 26

VII.  Timeline for implementation of this policy.................................................................................. 27

A.    Undergraduate Students.................................................................................................................................... 27

B.    Current Major, Concentration, Minor, and Certificate Programs................................................. 28

C.    Approval of new programs.................................................................................................................................. 28

VIII.  Implications for Existing Curriculum and Governance Policies................................ 28

 

 I.  Introduction

This document delineates the components, expectations, philosophy, and requirements of Baccalaureate Degrees and Certificates awarded by San Francisco State University. It is intended to provide understanding and guidance to those who are charged with the responsibility for creating, maintaining, approving, and evaluating undergraduate curriculum; and to provide specific identification of the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of Science, majors, minors, and certificates awarded by San Francisco State University. This document replaces or amends several policy documents approved by the Academic Senate and President of San Francisco State University from 1977 through 2009; the policies attenuated or superseded by this document are identified in section VIII.

In the fall of 2005, the Academic Senate created the Graduation Requirements Task Force (GRTF) and called for an assessment of “the appropriateness and value of the university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements currently required of all San Francisco State University undergraduate students” (Academic Senate Policy #F05-237, p. 1). This assessment and the GRTF’s development of new undergraduate degree requirements reflect the significant changes in both faculty and curriculum that have occurred since 1981, the last time a similar comprehensive review had been undertaken at San Francisco State University. The GRTF considered the kind of preparation required for success in the twenty-first century, the needs of the communities we serve, and the primary values and character of our university that we hoped our baccalaureate students would take with them. Each recommendation made by the GRTF was reviewed in light of the educational goals, desires to integrate values and skills across requirements, faculty interests and expertise, and various practical considerations given our large and diverse student body. The review process included self-studies, an external review, extensive consultations on and off campus, multiple proposals, anonymous surveys, formal and informal feedback, and revisions.

After extensive consultation and revisions, the GRTF submitted a statement of “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University” to the Academic Senate for its review; the Academic Senate endorsed those educational goals on March 11, 2008 (see Appendix A). The educational goals, as well as best practices identified through the review process, informed the GRTF’s development of a set of recommendations regarding specific degree requirements, course expectations, student learning outcomes, majors, minors, and certificates. Those recommendations, and the educational philosophy upon which they are built, are described in the GRTF’s final report, “Graduation Requirements Task Force (GRTF) Recommendations: Baccalaureate Degree Requirements at San Francisco State University,” submitted on November 20, 2009, to the Academic Senate. The GRTF report succinctly explains the components, expectations, and philosophy of a San Francisco State University baccalaureate degree. Elements of that report are included in the appendices. The report itself should also be considered as a general reference to assist the reader in fully understanding this policy document.

II.  General Education and other requirements common to all Baccalaureate Degrees

All baccalaureate degree programs include “university-wide” requirements as articulated in the following categories:

  1. General Education, including US/California History/Government requirements
  2. American Ethnic and Racial Minorities requirement
  3. Environmental Sustainability requirement
  4. Global Perspectives requirement
  5. Social Justice requirement
  6. Minimum grade-point average requirements
  7. Residence requirement
  8. Minimum credit-hour requirement
  9. Minimum upper-division credit-hour requirement
  10. Written English requirements

The specific requirements for each category are described in the appendices following several statements on how these requirements may be satisfied.

In addition, baccalaureate degrees may be awarded by San Francisco State University when students in addition satisfy the two following requirements:

  1. For B.A. degrees, complementary studies requirement
  2. Specialized (major) program of study requirements

A student’s diploma and transcript shall indicate the major, concentration, minor, certificate, and complementary studies earned by the student. The student’s transcript may also list other accomplishments, such as hours of community service learning classes, as approved by the Academic Senate and President.

A.  Methods of satisfying general education and other degree requirements

1.  Overlays

Requirements that are referred to as “overlays” may be fulfilled by any course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that carries the overlay designation. Because an overlay course may fulfill more than one requirement, an overlay may be completed without taking additional units. A single course may fulfill more than one university-wide requirement and may be listed in more than one place, if it meets all of the course expectations and student learning outcomes for the specified requirement. Courses that satisfy the overlay requirements must be a minimum of 3 units.

2.  Unlimited Double Counting

“Double counting” refers to the process of allowing a single course or completion of a major to satisfy multiple requirements. Provided a course meets the specified course expectations and student learning outcomes for the designated requirements, students may count the same course for any of the following: multiple university-wide requirements, major requirements, minor requirements, certificate requirements, or complementary studies requirements. In addition, major programs may apply to have specified university-wide requirements fulfilled by completing the major. Double counting to fulfill requirements does not multiply the number of units earned.

3.  Transfer Students

Transfer students may complete the 39 units of lower division university-wide requirements, overlay requirements, and lower-division courses in a major, minor, or certificate program, at another campus, if those units have been approved through an approved articulation system or an approved evaluation process. Transfer students who have not completed the equivalent of Written Communication II will have to do so as a prerequisite to GWAR (Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement) courses. Transfer students who do not complete overlay requirements elsewhere will have to complete them at San Francisco State University.

B.  General Education Requirements

The list of general education requirements that follows is consistent with the educational goals found in “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University,” endorsed by the Academic Senate on March 11, 2008; and requirements mandated in Executive Order 1033, “CSU General Education Breadth Requirements,” which governs general education requirements in the California State University system. Area designations below (i.e., A-E) correspond to areas specified in Executive Order 1033. The subject area distinctions of EO 1033 represent domains of knowledge with varying methods of inquiry instead of categories that can be defined by college, department, or program designations. Courses that meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes identified for an area will be approved for that area (see Appendices), regardless of the disciplinary designation of the program making the proposal. The course units specified for a requirement are the minimum number of units required. Courses which require more units (e.g., 4-unit classes instead of 3-unit classes) may be proposed to meet a requirement.

All students who earn baccalaureate degrees at San Francisco State University must complete a minimum of 48 units (39 lower division and 9 upper division) of university-wide requirements. The courses taken to fulfill these 48 units may vary for transfer students and students who begin their studies at San Francisco State University, but both types of students must complete the requirements specified in Table 1.

Table 1: General Education Requirements of all baccalaureate degrees.

Requirement

Course level

Units

E.O. 1033 area designation

Oral Communication

LD

3

A

Written English Communication I

LD

3

A

Critical Thinking

LD

3

A

Written English Communication II

LD

3

 

Physical Science

LD

3

B

Life Science

LD

3

B

Lab Science

LD

1 *

B

Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning

LD

3

B

Arts

LD

3

C

Arts or Humanities1

LD

3

C

Humanities: Literature 1

LD

3

C

Social Sciences

LD

3

D

Social Sciences: US History

LD

3

D

Social Sciences: US & CA Government

LD

3

D

Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (LLD)

LD or UD

3 *

E

Physical and/or Life Science

UD

3

B

Arts and/or Humanities

UD

3

C

Social Sciences

UD

3

D

American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM)

LD or UD

3 *

 

Environmental Sustainability (ES)

LD or UD

3 *

 

Global Perspectives (GP)

LD or UD

3*

 

Social Justice (SJ)

LD or UD

3 *

 

1 Please note: the C2/C3 labels for Humanities and Humanities: Literature have been switched since the original approval of the baccalaureate degree requirements policy to be consistent with community college designations.

Notes: LD = lower division; UD = upper division; * = overlay requirement. For overlays, the unit requirement can be satisfied by either an independent course or a course that also satisfies another general education requirement. For example, a 3-unit physical science course that includes a 1-unit laboratory component satisfies both the 3-unit physical science requirement and the 1-unit lab science requirement.

 

C.  Structure for Upper-Division General Education (UDGE)

All students, including transfer students, must complete a total of nine units with the equivalent of one course in each of the following CSU-mandated groupings of domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences (UD-B), (2) arts and/or humanities (UD-C), and (3) social sciences (UD-D). Students may also choose to complete the Upper-Division General Education Requirement through Integrated Studies or Study Abroad.

 

1.  UDGE Disciplinary Perspectives

(9 units minimum; must be taken in residence at San Francisco State University)

Upper-division General Education (UDGE) is rooted in the educational goals for baccalaureate degrees at San Francisco State University. Students must complete one course in each of the following groupings of domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences. Faculty teaching an upper division general education course from one of these domains (e.g. sciences, arts, humanities, or social sciences), are encouraged to draw connections to the others as appropriate. Each course will be designed to meet six student learning outcomes for the designated domain of knowledge and inquiry. A course may not be in more than one domain of knowledge.  (see Appendix H)

D.  American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Requirement

All students must earn a passing or better grade (or “CR”) in a course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated as an American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) course.

The student learning outcomes and course expectations for American Ethnic and Racial Minorities courses are described in the GRTF final report (see Appendix D).

E.  Environmental Sustainability Requirement

All students must earn a passing or better grade (or “CR”) in a course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated as an Environmental Sustainability (ES) Global Perspectives (GP) course.

The student learning outcomes and course expectations for Environmental Sustainability courses are described in the GRTF final report (see Appendix E).

F.  Global Perspectives Requirement

All students must earn a passing or better grade (or “CR”) in a course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated as a Global Perspectives (GP) course.

The student learning outcomes and course expectations for Global Perspectives courses are described in the GRTF final report (see Appendix F).

G.  Social Justice Requirement

All students must earn a passing or better grade (or “CR”) in a course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated as a Social Justice (SJ) course. The student learning outcomes and course expectations for Social Justice courses are described in the GRTF final report (see Appendix G).

H. Minimum Grade-point Average Requirement

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.00 for all coursework used to satisfy degree requirements; a GPA of at least 2.00 for all coursework completed at San Francisco State University; and a GPA of at least 2.00 for all coursework used to satisfy the major or concentration requirements. Further, to be awarded a minor, a student must have a GPA of at least 2.00 for all coursework used to satisfy the minor requirements.

I.  Residency Requirement

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have completed at least 30 units at San Francisco State University, including at least 24 upper-division units. All students must complete the nine units of upper-division general education requirements at San Francisco State University. At least 12 units of courses used to complete major or concentration requirements must be completed in residence at San Francisco State University.

J.  Minimum Credit-hour Requirement

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have completed at least 120 semester units. These credits may have been earned at SFSU or at another institution, if that credit has been transferred to and approved by San Francisco State University.

K.  Minimum Upper-division Credit-hour Requirement

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have completed at least 40 semester units of upper-division courses.

L.  Written English Requirements

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have earned a C or better grade in Written English Communication I and Written English Communication II, or their equivalents, and satisfied the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement.

III.  Majors

A.  Requirements and restrictions of all major programs

1.  Educational Goals

At the time of creation, revision, and program review, major programs must provide information about how they are contributing to at least four of the university’s six educational goals:

  1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor
  2. Intellectual Attainments
  3. Appreciation of Diversity
  4. Ethical Engagement
  5. Integration and Application of Knowledge
  6. Qualities of Mind and Spirit

2.  Prerequisites

Major programs must comply with the following prerequisite rules and the requisite disclosures must appear in the University Bulletin:

  1. If a program does not name specific courses but does establish that a university-wide requirement (e.g. upper or lower division writing, quantitative reasoning, etc.) must be met as a prerequisite, those prerequisites are not counted in the major.
  2. If a program requires students to take specific courses as prerequisites, even if these also meet university-wide requirements, those courses must be listed and counted as units required in the major.
  3. If a program requires students to take general prerequisites in addition to university-wide requirements (e.g. first-year foreign language, a course in world history, etc.) those prerequisites must be listed and counted as units required in the major.
  4. Prerequisites that might be met through prior experiences (e.g., high school courses, AP credit, heritage language experiences, etc.) must be identified.
  5. If the number of units required in a program varies based on different course options or prerequisites for those options, the major program must clearly explain the variation in units.

3.  Lower Division Classes

Major programs are encouraged to allow at least 6 units of lower-division credit to be counted in the major. 

4.  Writing in the Major

Major programs must require that majors complete a GWAR (Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement) course. In addition major programs should provide intensive experiences, as defined by the program, at the senior level.

5.  Technology Related to the Major

Major programs must include curriculum appropriate instruction, as defined by the program, in the technologies most relevant to the major. This may occur in a single course or multiple courses. Courses providing this instruction may be housed in the major program or elsewhere, but major programs should ensure their majors receive this instruction.

6.  High Impact Educational Practices

At the time of program review, major programs will be asked which of the following high impact educational practices they provide their major programs, the nature of those practices, and what they know about the effectiveness of such practices for their major programs: (1) first-year seminars and experiences, (2) common intellectual experiences, (3) learning communities, (4) writing-intensive courses, (5) collaborative assignments and projects, (6) undergraduate research, (7) diversity/global learning, (8) service learning, community-based learning, (9) internships, and (10) capstone courses and projects. A summary description of these practices can be found in the GRTF Final Report.

7.  Flexibility and Advising

Major programs are encouraged, but not required, to offer students multiple options for completing requirements, when appropriate to do so, and review prerequisites with consideration for what lower-division students and first-semester transfer students would be able to take. Major programs are also encouraged to include on their websites documents students can use to plan the completion of their major.

8. Culminating Experiences

A culminating experience will be required of all students as part of all major programs.  Departments and programs will design and implement capstone courses or other culminating experiences for major students at the senior level by Fall 2015.  Maximum flexibility will be given to programs and departments in the design of these courses or other experiences, so long as they fulfill the spirit of the culminating experience concept.

Definition: The culminating experience requires students nearing the end of their college years to create a project that integrates and applies what they have learned.  The project might be a research paper, a performance, a portfolio of “best work”, or an exhibit.  It might be attached to a formal course for credit, or might not.  Culminating experiences should offer some hands-on element such as internship, study abroad, application of learned skills, or research within the field.

 

 The following additional recommendations pertain:

  1. Ideally, the culminating experience will integrate learning from the general education program and major as well as co-curricular activities. 
  2. It is further recommended that it include a significant writing component appropriate to the discipline.
  1. The culminating experience may be designed as either individual or collaborative courses or projects.

 

Departments shall self-evaluate their culminating experience requirements at each program review.

 

B.  Requirements and restrictions specific to Bachelor of Science degree programs

1.  Minimum and maximum number of units

Ordinarily, Bachelor of Science major programs may not require less than 40 nor more than 70 units for completion of the major. It is expected that students will have some electives they can choose themselves within the 120 units needed for the degree. Major programs seeking to exceed the unit limits may request an exception on the basis of major requirements also completing other requirements (e.g., university-wide requirements or complementary studies (see below), accreditation requirements, or some other significant justification.)

C.  Requirements and restrictions specific to Bachelor of Music degree programs

1.  Minimum and maximum number of units

Ordinarily, Bachelor of Music major programs require 70 units for completion of the major. It is expected that students will have some electives they can choose themselves within the 120 units needed for the degree. Major programs seeking to exceed the unit limits may request an exception on the basis of major requirements also completing other requirements (e.g., university-wide requirements or complementary studies (see below), accreditation requirements, or some other significant justification.)

D.  Requirements and restrictions specific to Bachelor of Arts degree programs

1.  Minimum and maximum number of units

Ordinarily, Bachelor of Arts major programs may not require less than 24 nor more than 45 units for completion of the major. It is expected that students will have some electives they can choose themselves within the 120 units needed for the degree. Major programs seeking to exceed the unit limits may request an exception on the basis of major requirements also completing other requirements (e.g., university-wide requirements or complementary studies (see below), accreditation requirements, or some other significant justification.)

2.  Complementary Studies Requirement for Majors in BA degree programs

Bachelor of Arts students must complete at least twelve units of complementary studies outside of the primary prefix for the major. Complementary studies units may come from languages other than English, minors, certificates, or a coherent group of courses approved by a major advisor as complementary to the major. With the approval of an advisor in the major, courses that fulfill complementary studies units may be lower or upper division units, resident or transfer units, or units taken in approved study abroad programs. B.A. programs may decide how many, if any, of the complementary units may be counted in the major, and they may designate specific courses to be taken for complementary studies credit or they may develop advising protocols to guide students through this process. Students who complete two majors or a major and a minor automatically complete the complementary studies requirement. Complementary studies units may be included in the maximum units allowed for B.A. degrees (i.e., 45 units) or they may be in addition to that maximum (i.e., 45 units in the major plus 12 additional units in complementary studies.) If complementary studies units are listed as part of the major, the maximum for this combined total is 57 units.

Major programs submit their descriptions of complementary studies for their majors for review and approval by the Curriculum Review and Approval Committee. These descriptions will also be evaluated as part of the program review process as programs come up for review. Examples of complementary studies requirements can be found in Appendix I. Students earning Bachelor of Music or Bachelor of Science degrees do not have to complete the complementary studies requirement.

IV.  Minors

A.  Definition of Minors

A minor is an area of specialized academic training, disciplinary or interdisciplinary in character, which is typically undertaken by a degree candidate in order to supplement or complement the major field of study, or to provide academic training in a minor subject or alternative field of study.  In comparison to a major field of study, the disciplinary minor is generally more narrow or restricted in scope while the interdisciplinary minor will typically exhibit a broader area of subject coverage.  In both instances, fewer course credits are required than in the major field of study.

B.  Prerequisites

Minors must comply with the following prerequisite rules and the requisite disclosures must appear in the University Bulletin:

  1. If a program does not name specific courses but does establish that a university-wide requirement (e.g. upper or lower division writing, quantitative reasoning, lower division art, etc.) must be met as a prerequisite, those prerequisites are not counted in the minor.
  2. If a program requires students to take specific courses as prerequisites, even if these also meet university-wide requirements, those courses must be listed and counted as units required in the minor.
  3. If a program requires students to take general prerequisites in addition to university-wide requirements (e.g. first year foreign language, a course in world history, etc.) those prerequisites must be listed and counted as units required in the minor.
  4. Prerequisites that might be met through prior experiences (e.g., high school courses, AP credit, heritage language experiences, etc.) must be identified.
  5. If the number of units required in a program varies based on different course options or prerequisites for those options, the minor program must clearly explain the variation in units.

C.  Criteria for Minors

  1. The program is to consist of a minimum of 12 semester units and a maximum of 24 units.
  2. Credit by examination is permitted in accordance with established university regulations.
  3. All course work used to satisfy the requirements of a minor must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
  4. A minimum of one-half of the units for the minor program should be in upper division courses, unless a specific exception has been granted; every minor must require at least 6 upper division units.
  5. Normally, no more than one-half of the units used to meet the requirements for the minor may be transfer units.
  6. A maximum of three units in the minor may be devoted to internships and/or independent study unless a specific exception has been granted in advance.
  7. All courses that meet the requirements of a minor may be used, as appropriate, simultaneously to meet requirements in general education, credentials, certificates, or complementary studies.
  8. The curriculum in minor programs must contribute to at least four of the six goals described in “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University” and minor programs must provide information in their program reviews about how they are contributing to those goals.
  9. Students may not complete a major and minor in the same discipline (i.e., within the same HEGIS code).

V.  Certificates

A.  Definition of Undergraduate Certificates

A certificate program is a coherent set of academic courses that does not lead to a degree, but is focused on a substantial area of study that may be practically oriented toward skills and/or occupations. Certificate programs are an additional way of organizing curriculum in order to serve matriculated students or students who wish to spend a limited time in college in order to learn specific subjects, concepts, skills and competencies. Certificate programs shall not infringe upon existing majors in degree programs. Since minor programs do not lead to degrees, however, some minor programs may, of themselves, constitute certificate programs, and some certificate programs may be subsumed within a minor. The award of a certificate means that the holder has completed the required course work at a certain level of academic accomplishment. A certificate indicates to a prospective employer that the University validates the particular program of study. It neither credentials nor licenses the student, nor does it guarantee the ability of the student to put into practice what has been studied.

B.  Prerequisites

Certificates must comply with the following prerequisite rules and the requisite disclosures must appear in the University Bulletin:

  1. If a program does not name specific courses but does establish that a university-wide requirement (e.g. upper or lower division writing, quantitative reasoning, lower division art, etc.) must be met as a prerequisite, those prerequisites are not counted in the certificate.
  2. If a program requires students to take specific courses as prerequisites, even if these also meet university-wide requirements, those courses must be listed and counted as units required in the certificate.
  3. If a program requires students to take general prerequisites in addition to university-wide requirements (e.g. first year foreign language, a course in world history, etc.) those prerequisites must be listed and counted as units required in the certificate.
  4. Prerequisites that might be met through prior experiences (e.g., high school courses, AP credit, heritage language experiences, etc.) must be identified.
  5. If the number of units required in a program varies based on different course options or prerequisites for those options, the certificate program must clearly explain the variation in units.

C.  Criteria for Undergraduate Certificates

  1. Undergraduate certificate programs require a minimum of 12 semester units.
  2. Credit by examination is permitted in accordance with established university regulations.
  3. All course work used to satisfy the requirements of an undergraduate certificate must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
  4. Normally, no more than one-half of the units used to meet the requirements for the certificate may be transfer units.
  5. A maximum of three units in the certificate may be devoted to internships and/or independent study unless a specific exception has been granted in advance.
  6. All courses for meeting the requirements of a certificate may be used, as appropriate, simultaneously to meet requirements in general education, credentials, or complementary studies.
  7. Before completing any certificate, students must demonstrate an appropriate level of writing competency. The appropriate level shall be determined by the program proposers in consultation with the Committee on Written English Proficiency. Each certificate program proposal must specify how the above steps are to be accomplished.
  8. Matriculated students may complete certificates while enrolled in degree programs. Non-matriculated students may complete certificates through Open University or the College of Extended Learning.

VI.  Oversight and Approval Process for Baccalaureate degrees, majors, concentrations, minors, and certificates.

A.  Oversight and Approval Process for University-Wide Requirements

The Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) will oversee all activities related to university-wide degree requirements, including the approval process for courses to be certified as satisfying any university-wide requirements. The approval process for courses to be certified as satisfying any university-wide requirements involves two different committee structures: Seven temporary “Initial Certification Committees” will be established to carry out the initial certification of courses that satisfy general education and overlay requirements. When the BRC has determined that the initial certification process is completed, it will inform the Academic Senate that the seven initial certification committees should be dissolved and that two permanent committees, the Lower Division Certification Committee (LDCC) and the Upper Division Certification Committee (UDCC), should be established. The charge and membership of these committees are described below. Proposals to establish new and to revise existing courses to satisfy the course expectations and student learning outcomes described in this document and its appendices must comply with Academic Senate policy #S91-170, Guiding Principles for Review and Approval of New or Revised Courses.

1.  Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC)

a. Committee Charge

The Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) will be responsible for developing, reviewing, recommending, and publicizing the policies, principles and procedures, and guidelines that govern university-wide requirements for baccalaureate degrees. The BRC will respond to and initiate adjustments in program principles, course expectations, student learning outcomes, and the program curriculum as changing times and needs indicate. The BRC will submit its decisions and recommendations to the Academic Senate, the Provost, and the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Upon final approval, the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, in cooperation with the BRC, will facilitate the implementation of program policies, procedures, guidelines, and agreed upon curricular adjustments and will ensure that all areas within university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements are responsibly and adequately represented. Members of the BRC will:

  1. Review all policies, procedures, reviews, approvals, implementations and disseminations related to university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements;
  2. recommend changes in policies related to university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements to the Academic Senate;
  3. monitor and review recommendations and reports made by the established university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements subcommittees;
  4. manage the terms of service and work distribution between the initial and continuing university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements subcommittees;
  5. initiate the selection of university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements subcommittees;
  6. act as a board of appeals on all policy and procedural matters related to university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements;
  7. act as the final faculty committee for review of course proposals for university-wide requirements for baccalaureate degrees and make its recommendations through the Dean of Undergraduate Studies to the Provost;
  8. request data, reports, and information from the Dean of Undergraduate studies regarding all aspects of implementing, delivering, and evaluating university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements;
  9. review recommendations and reports submitted at least annually by the Director of Advising; and
  10. have primary responsibility for increasing campus awareness and understanding of baccalaureate requirements.

b. Committee Membership

The Baccalaureate Requirements Committee shall be composed of the following members:

Voting Members

  • One college representative elected from and by the faculty
  • One faculty representative from the Library elected by librarians.
  • One representative selected from the Advising Center professional staff by the director of the Undergraduate Advising Center.
  • One representative selected from the Student Affairs area professional staff by the associate vice president for Student Affairs.
  • One student representative selected by the Associated Students Board of Directors.
  • One representative appointed by the Academic Senate.

Nonvoting Members

  • The Dean of Undergraduate Studies or the Dean’s designee.
  • One representative from Enrollment Management.
  • One representative from the University Academic Assessment Advisory Committee.
  • Chair of the Lower Division Certification Committee (LDC) or designee (information about this committee is provided in the section titled “Lower Division Certification Committee” below).
  • Chair of the Upper Division Certification Committee (UDC) or designee (information about this committee is provided in the section titled “Upper Division Certification Committee” below).
  • The faculty member serving as Director of General Education.

The Academic Senate shall notify Deans, the University Librarian, the Director of the Advising Center, and the Associated Students Governing Board when there is a vacancy in their units.  Faculty members in their respective units will elect their representatives. The Advising Center, Student Affairs, and the Associated Students Governing Board shall choose a representative by their usual procedures for selecting committee members.  In the case of a vacancy within a term of service, Deans and their equivalences may appoint a replacement until the next election or selection process in that unit.

c. Quorum

A quorum for BRC shall consist of a majority of voting members.

d. BRC Terms of Service

All terms are for three years, except for the student and Academic Senate representatives, who shall each serve for one year. Members may be re-elected and may serve successive terms; there are no term limits. Terms of membership will not be staggered initially. If a position is vacated before a term is completed, a newly elected member will serve a full three-year term.

e. Committee Chair

The Chair will be elected by the members of the BRC. Chairs serve a one year term that may be renewed.

f. BRC and the Academic Senate

BRC may approve the certification and decertification of courses in consultation with the Initial, Lower Division, and Upper Division Certification committees; but recommendations for policy changes require the approval of the Academic Senate and President. When BRC wishes to make policy changes, the Chair of BRC will forward those recommendations to the Academic Senate. The Chair of the BRC will make two reports each semester to the Executive Committee of the Academic Senate regarding BRC’s work and will address the Academic Senate as requested by the Executive Committee of the Academic Senate.

2.  Initial Certification Committees

There shall be seven committees to carry out the initial certification of courses meeting university requirements at San Francisco State University. Separate committees will be constituted for review of courses for inclusion in Areas A, B, C, D, E, as well as one committee to review all courses submitted to meet one of the four overlays (i.e. AERM, GP, Environmental Sustainability and/or SJ.). There shall be one committee to carry out the initial certification of courses for inclusion in the Topical Perspectives option and Integrated Study option of the upper division General Education program. (No certification committee will exist for the Study Abroad option since programs are constructed on an individual basis.)

a. Committee Charge

The initial certification committees will evaluate and recommend to the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC; details about BRC appear in the section titled “Continuing Certification and Monitoring” below) course proposals for meeting university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements on the basis of how well they fulfill course expectations and student learning outcomes for those requirements. It is expected that initial certification committees will develop streamlined processes that both ensure that approved courses meet the expected learning objectives but that are not overly burdensome on those submitting proposals. The committees will also consider the overall viability of the Area, including accessibility of sufficient courses in the Area to meet student needs. The committee may consider things such as prerequisites and offering frequency and patterns when determining whether a given Area will be able to meet student demand. The committees will also review the degree to which courses within an Area, especially at the upper division level, have a sufficient number of courses which meet overlay requirements to make it likely that students will have adequate access to those requirements. If a committee has concerns about sufficient offerings, those concerns should be brought to the attention of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies who will then work with College Deans to acquire sufficient offerings. Faculty may also propose to the committees co-curricular activities to meet university-wide requirements (e.g., in a given year when the national debate topic is international in scope, the Director of the Debate Team might propose that members of the debate team get credit for the global perspectives requirement, or if the goals of a learning community are consistent with a requirement the faculty advisor might request that members of that community receive credit for that requirement).

b. Review of Committee Recommendations

The Initial Certification Committee's reasons for recommending the disapproval of courses will be stated in writing to the BRC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for the Area.  The chair of the Initial Certification Committee is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the BRC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations.

c. Committee Membership

The Initial Certification Committees will be composed of the following members:

  • One faculty representative from each of the colleges:
  • One faculty representative from the Library.
  • One Academic Advising Professional.
  • One representative from the Liberal Studies Council.  The committee reviewing Upper Division General Education Requirements shall instead have one representative from the University Interdisciplinary Council.
  • One representative from the Associated Students (ASI).

If any of the above units do not select a representative, the committee shall be considered duly constituted as long as five members have been appointed or elected by their Colleges or Units (not including ASI). If fewer than five members have been appointed or elected, the Executive Committee of the Academic Senate will seek members from units not already represented until the minimum of five members has been reached. A quorum will be a majority of the members of the committee. If there are not enough members to staff all of the recommended committees or if the workload of any given committee is too great, the Senate Executive Committee has the authority to combine committees or add committees using the same membership principles articulated above.

d. Committee Terms of Service

All terms are for one to three years as determined by the BRC, or until the initial certification process is complete. Terms of membership will not be staggered initially. If a position is vacated before a term is completed, a newly elected member will serve a full term.

e. Committee Chairs

The chair of each committee will be elected by the members of the Committee.

f. Meeting times

In-person meeting days and times for each committee shall be set and announced in advance of elections by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Faculty elected to the committees will be expected to keep those days and times available for in-person meetings. Committees will conduct as much work as possible electronically and shall meet during the scheduled time when necessary.

 

 

 

g. BRC representative

A member of the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) shall be identified to help each initial certification committee begin its work and shall be available for consultation and help as needed.

3. Lower Division Certification Committee (LDCC)

a. Committee Charge

After the initial certification period has passed, the Lower Division Certification Committee (LDCC) will be constituted. Its purpose will be to evaluate and recommend lower division courses for meeting university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements (Areas and/or Overlays) on the basis of how well they fulfill course expectations and student learning outcomes for those requirements. The Committee's reasons for recommending disapproval of any lower division course will be stated in writing to the BRC and to the appropriate department chair and college dean in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes specified for lower division courses.  The LDCC will work with the University Academic Assessment Advisory Committee (UAAAC) to carry out assessment of lower division courses designated as meeting baccalaureate degree requirements on a rotating schedule to ensure their continued currency and adequacy to satisfy assessment requirements.  The chair of the LDC is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the BRC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations. 

b. Committee Membership

The Lower Division Certification Committee shall be composed the following members:

Voting Members

  • Two college representatives elected from and by the faculty
  • One faculty representative from the Library elected by librarians.
  • One representative selected from the Advising Center professional staff by the director of the Undergraduate Advising Center.
  • One student representative selected by the Associated Students Board of Directors.

Nonvoting Members

  • One representative from BRC, as a nonvoting member.
  • The Dean of Undergraduate Studies, or the Dean’s designee, as a nonvoting member.

The Academic Senate shall notify Deans, the University Librarian, the Director of the Advising Center, and the Associated Students Governing Board when there is a vacancy in their units.  Faculty members in their respective units will elect their representatives. The Advising Center and the Associated Students Governing Board shall choose a representative by their usual procedures for selecting committee members. In the case of a vacancy within a term of service, Deans and their equivalences may appoint a replacement until the next election or selection process in that unit.

c. Quorum

A quorum shall consist of a majority of voting members.

d. Committee Terms of Service

All terms are for three years, except for the student representative who will serve for one year. Members may be re-elected and may serve successive terms; there are no term limits. Terms of membership will not be staggered initially. If a position is vacated before a term is completed, a newly elected member will serve a full three-year term.

e. Committee Chair

The chair will be elected by the members of the Lower Division Certification Committee and is encouraged to attend the BRC meetings as a nonvoting member of BRC.

f. Lower Division Certification Committee Responsibilities

Members of the Lower Division Certification Committee will:

  1. Recommend approval/disapproval to the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) of new and revised course proposals based on their adequacy in meeting the specified course expectations and student learning outcomes for lower-division classes designated as meeting university-wide requirements;
  2. forward to BRC any dissenting opinions;
  3. ensure that all approved and proposed lower-division courses continue to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes specified in the General Education policy by reviewing re-certification materials submitted to the committee on a four-year rotating schedule;
  4. request consultation with faculty concerning the review of courses that fail to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes for lower-division classes designated as meeting university-wide requirements;
  5. recommend to the BRC in writing its reasons for requesting deletion of courses that fail to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes for lower-division classes designated meeting university-wide requirements after consulting with all involved parties;
  6. work closely with the BRC and the Dean of Undergraduate Studies to ensure accessibility (including time of day offerings) and to resolve persistent problems in university-wide requirements;
  7. implement the approved assessment plan for evaluating lower-division courses as well as the overall effectiveness of lower division courses in meeting the course expectations and student learning outcomes; and
  8. constitute ad hoc committees of faculty with expertise in a particular area to provide advice.

4. Upper Division Certification Committee (UDCC)

a. Committee Charge

After the initial certification period has passed, the Upper Division Certification Committee (UDCC) will be constituted. Its purpose will be to evaluate and recommend upper division courses for meeting university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements (Areas and/or Overlays) on the basis of how well they fulfill course expectations and student learning outcomes for those requirements. The Committee's reasons for recommending disapproval of any upper division course will be stated in writing to the BRC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes specified for upper division courses.  The UDCC will work with the University Academic Assessment Advisory Committee (UAAAC) to carry out assessment of upper division courses meeting university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements on a rotating schedule to ensure their continued currency and adequacy to satisfy requirements.  The chair of the UDCC is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the BRC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations. 

b. Committee Membership

The Upper Division Committee shall be composed of the following:

Voting Members

  • Two college representatives elected from and by the faculty
  • One faculty representative from the Library elected by librarians.
  • One representative selected from the Advising Center professional staff by the director of the Undergraduate Advising Center.
  • One student representative selected by the Associated Students Board of Directors.

Nonvoting Members

  • One representative from BRC, as a nonvoting member.
  • The Dean of Undergraduate Studies, or the Dean’s designee, as a nonvoting member.

The Academic Senate shall notify Deans, the University Librarian, the Director of the Advising Center, and Associated Students Governing Board when there is a vacancy in their units.  Faculty members in their respective units will elect their representatives. The Advising Center and the Associated Students Governing Board shall choose a representative by their usual procedures for selecting committee members.  In the case of a vacancy within a term of service, Deans and their equivalences may appoint a replacement until the next election in that unit.

c. Quorum

A quorum shall consist of a majority of voting members.

d. Committee Terms of Service

All terms are for three years, except for the student representative who will serve for one year. Members may be re-elected and serve successive terms; there are no term limits. Terms of membership will not be staggered initially. If a position is vacated before a term is completed, a newly elected member will serve a full three-year term.

e. Committee Chair

The chair will be elected by the members of the Upper Division Certification Committee and is encouraged to attend the BRC meetings as a nonvoting member of BRC.

f. Upper Division Certification Committee Responsibilities

Members of the Upper Division Certification Committee will:

  1. Recommend approval/disapproval to the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) of new and revised course proposals based on their adequacy in meeting the specified course expectations and student learning outcomes for upper-division classes designated as meeting university-wide requirements;
  2. forward to BRC any dissenting opinions;
  3. ensure that all approved and proposed upper-division courses continue to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes specified in the General Education policy by reviewing re-certification materials submitted to the committee on a four-year rotating schedule;
  4. request consultation with faculty concerning the review of courses that fail to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes for upper-division classes designated as meeting university-wide requirements;
  5. recommend to the BRC in writing its reasons for requesting deletion of courses that fail to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes for upper-division classes designated meeting university-wide requirements after consulting with all involved parties;
  6. work closely with the BRC and the Dean of Undergraduate Studies to ensure accessibility (including time of day offerings) and to resolve persistent problems in university-wide requirements;
  7. implement the approved assessment plan for evaluating upper division courses as well as the overall effectiveness of upper division courses in meeting the course expectations and student learning outcomes; and
  8. when necessary, constitute ad hoc committees of faculty with expertise in a particular area to provide advice.

 

5. Director of General Education

A faculty member will serve as the Director of General Education to facilitate the implementation of this policy.

 

B.  Oversight and Approval Process for Major/Concentration Programs

New major/concentration programs are subject to review and approval by the Provost's Office, the Curriculum and Review Committee, the Academic Senate, and the President.

Significant, detailed information is required for review and approval of a proposed new major program. Requests for approval of a major program should follow the format below.

1.  General Procedures for Proposing Major and Concentration Programs

Proposals for new major programs typically require significant information on the resources needed to offer the program and the anticipated demand for the program. Departments, Programs, Colleges, or groups of faculty who wish to develop a new major program should consult with the university curriculum coordinator very early in the planning stages to learn the requirements of and procedures to gain approval for new major programs.

Proposals for new concentrations that represent a bifurcation or other splitting of an existing major program usually do not require as much information as those for new major programs. Departments, Programs, Colleges, or groups of faculty who wish to develop new concentrations for existing major programs should consult with the university curriculum coordinator very early in the planning stages to learn the requirements of and procedures to gain approval for the new concentration programs.

Proposals to revise existing major and concentration programs should follow the steps listed below.

2.  General Procedures for Proposing Revisions to Major and Concentration Programs

  1. Proposals ordinarily shall be initiated by Departments, Programs, or Colleges of the University, and following College approval shall be processed through the regular program review process of the University, including review by the Curriculum Review and Approval Committee, the Academic Senate, the Provost, and the President. At each level of review, the proposal may be approved, denied, or returned for additional information.
  2. Proposals should be submitted in the format prescribed. Copies of the guidelines are available from the Office of the Provost.
  3. The sponsoring unit (i.e., program, department, school, college, interdisciplinary area) must designate an appropriate faculty member who will be responsible for coordinating the program. As may be appropriate, this may be the department chair.
  4. All officially approved major and concentration programs should be described in the University Bulletin.
  5. All information circulated in connection with such programs should have the prior clearance of the appropriate college dean.
  6. Upon satisfactory completion of an approved major or concentration program, including making formal application for same, the Director of Admissions and Records, or his/her designee, shall enter an appropriate designation on the student's permanent record and shall maintain annual records of the names (and numbers) of all students completing such majors or concentrations.  The Director of Admissions and Records should report to the Provost each year on the number and type of majors and concentrations completed.

3.  Procedures for Proposing Interdisciplinary Majors and Concentrations

In addition to following the general procedures listed above, the development of interdisciplinary proposals includes the following steps:

  1. A "Prospectus" is prepared on the new major or concentration to include:
  1. proposed title of new major or concentration and general subject areas likely to be included in the program
  2. statement of need for and/or desirability of new major or concentration in relation to the mission of the institution;
  3. expected clientele (i.e., type and numbers) for this new program;
  4. a statement of resources (including library resources) which are likely to be required and a statement of impact on other programs of the University;
  5. names of sponsors which must include representatives from each disciplinary area likely to be involved in offering the program.
  1. The Prospectus is submitted to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies who will be responsible for its dissemination to all College Deans for information purposes and for coordinating its review by the University Interdisciplinary Council and approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
  2. Development, Approval, and Implementation of Formal Program Proposal
  1. After the major or concentration is approved for inclusion in the Academic Master Plan, the University Interdisciplinary Council in consultation with the original program proposers shall designate a formal Program Committee to include as many of the original program proposers as desire to serve, plus others as appropriate.
  2. Program Committee prepares curriculum of new major or concentration utilizing the general procedures for proposing majors (see above).
  3. Completed program proposal is directed to appropriate College Dean for appropriate consultations and endorsements.
  4. After College endorsements are received, final proposal is submitted to the University Interdisciplinary Council, CRAC, Academic Senate, Provost, and where necessary, the Chancellor's Office for final approval.
  5. Major/concentration is assigned an administrative home per the guidelines of the Interdisciplinary Studies Task Force Report.
  6. On-going oversight and evaluation responsibilities for the new program are shared by the University Interdisciplinary Council and the Provost's Office.

The Curriculum Review and Approval Committee shall be charged with the review and approval of proposed and revised major and concentration programs. Major and concentration programs shall be subject to review in conjunction with the five-year academic review of the program, department, college, and/or division in which the program is housed.

C.  Oversight and Approval Process for Minor Programs

New minor programs are subject to review and approval by the Provost's Office, the Curriculum and Review Committee, the Academic Senate, and the President.

The information required for review and approval of a proposed minor program is less detailed than for a full degree major program. Requests for approval of a minor program should follow the format below.

1.  General Procedures for Proposing Minors

  1. Proposals ordinarily shall be initiated by Departments, Programs, or Colleges of the University, and following College approval shall be processed through the regular program review process of the University in the same manner as other new and revised curricular programs.
  2. Proposals should be submitted in the format prescribed. Copies of the guidelines are available from the Office of the Provost.
  3. The sponsoring unit (i.e., program, department, school, college, interdisciplinary area) must designate an appropriate faculty member who will be responsible for coordinating the program. As may be appropriate, this may be the department chair.
  4. All officially approved minor programs should be described in the University Bulletin.
  5. All information circulated in connection with such programs should have the prior clearance of the appropriate college dean.
  6. Upon satisfactory completion of an approved minor program, including making formal application for same, the Director of Admissions and Records, or his/her designee, shall enter an appropriate designation on the student's permanent record and shall maintain annual records of the names (and numbers) of all students completing minors.  The Director of Admissions and Records should report to the Provost each year on the number and type of minors completed.
  7. In recognition of the desire to maintain some flexibility in meeting unique program needs, academic units of the University may submit proposals to the Office of the Undergraduate Studies (for subsequent review by appropriate Academic Senate committees) which are in some way at variance with the stated criteria. When this is done, ample justification for the variance must be submitted as an integral part of the proposal.
  8. The Curriculum Review and Approval Committee shall be charged with the review and approval of proposed or revised minor programs. Minor programs shall be subject to review in conjunction with the five-year academic review of the program, department, college, and/or division in which the minor is housed.

2.  Procedures for Proposing Interdisciplinary Minors

In addition to following the general procedures listed above, the development of interdisciplinary proposals includes the following steps:

  1. A "Prospectus" is prepared on the new minor to include:
  1. proposed title of new minor and general subject areas likely to be included in the program
  2. statement of need for and/or desirability of new minor in relation to the mission of the institution;
  3. expected clientele (i.e., type and numbers) for this new program;
  4. a statement of resources (including library resources) which are likely to be required and a statement of impact on other programs of the University;
  5. names of sponsors which must include representatives from each disciplinary area likely to be involved in offering the program.
  1. The Prospectus is submitted to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies who will be responsible for its dissemination to all College Deans for information purposes and for coordinating its review by the University Interdisciplinary Council and approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
  2. Development, Approval, and Implementation of Formal Program Proposal
  1. After the minor is approved for inclusion in the Academic Master Plan, the University Interdisciplinary Council in consultation with the original program proposers shall designate a formal Program Committee to include as many of the original program proposers as desire to serve, plus others as appropriate.
  2. Program Committee prepares curriculum of new minor utilizing the general procedures for proposing minors (see above).
  3. Completed program proposal is directed to appropriate College Dean for appropriate consultations and endorsements.
  4. After College endorsements are received, final proposal is submitted to the University Interdisciplinary Council, CRAC, Academic Senate, Provost, and where necessary, the Chancellor's Office for final approval.
  5. Minor is assigned an administrative home per the guidelines of the Interdisciplinary Studies Task Force Report.
  6. On-going oversight and evaluation responsibilities for the new program are shared by the University Interdisciplinary Council and the Provost's Office.

The Curriculum Review and Approval Committee shall be charged with the review and approval of proposed and revised minor programs. Minor programs shall be subject to review in conjunction with the five-year academic review of the program, department, college, and/or division in which the minor is housed.

D.  Oversight and Approval Process for Certificate Programs

New certificate programs are subject to review and approval by the Provost's Office, the Curriculum and Review Committee, the Academic Senate, and the President.

The information required for review and approval of a proposed certificate program is less detailed than for a full degree major program. Requests for approval of a certificate program should follow the format below.

1.  General Procedures for Proposing Undergraduate Certificates

  1. Proposals ordinarily shall be initiated by Departments, Programs, or Colleges of the University, and following College approval shall be processed through the regular program review process of the University in the same manner as other new and revised curricular programs.
  2. Proposals should be submitted in the format prescribed. Copies of the guidelines are available from the Office of the Provost.
  3. The sponsoring unit (i.e., program, department, school, college, interdisciplinary area) must designate an appropriate faculty member who will be responsible for coordinating the program. As may be appropriate, this may be the department chair.
  4. All officially approved certificate programs should be described in the University Bulletin.
  5. All information circulated in connection with such programs should have the prior clearance of the appropriate College Dean.
  6. Upon satisfactory completion of an approved certificate program, including making formal application for same, the Director of Admissions and Records, or his/her designee, shall enter an appropriate designation on the student's permanent record and shall maintain annual records of the names (and numbers) of all students completing certificates. The Director of Admissions and Records should report to the Provost each year on the number and type of certificates completed.

2.  Procedures for Proposing Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Certificates     

In addition to following the general procedures listed above, the development of interdisciplinary proposals includes the following steps:

  1. A "Prospectus" is prepared on the new certificate to include:
  1. proposed title of new certificate and general subject areas likely to be included in the program
  2. statement of need for and/or desirability of new certificate in relation to the mission of the institution;
  3. expected clientele (i.e., type and numbers) for this new program;
  4. a statement of resources (including library resources) which are likely to be required and a statement of impact on other programs of the University;
  5. names of sponsors which must include representatives from each disciplinary area likely to be involved in offering the program.
  1. The Prospectus is submitted to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies who will be responsible for its dissemination to all College Deans for information purposes and for coordinating its review by the University Interdisciplinary Council and approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
  2. Development, Approval, and Implementation of Formal Program Proposal
  1. After the certificate is approved for inclusion in the Academic Master Plan, the University Interdisciplinary Council in consultation with the original program proposers shall designate a formal Program Committee to include as many of the original program proposers as desire to serve, plus others as appropriate.
  2. Program Committee prepares curriculum of new minor utilizing the general procedures for proposing minors (see above).
  3. Completed program proposal is directed to appropriate College Dean for appropriate consultations and endorsements.
  4. After College endorsements are received, final proposal is submitted to the University Interdisciplinary Council, CRAC, Academic Senate, Provost, and where necessary, the Chancellor's Office for final approval.
  5. Minor is assigned an administrative home per the guidelines of the Interdisciplinary Studies Task Force Report.

On-going oversight and evaluation responsibilities for the new interdisciplinary certificate program are shared by the University Interdisciplinary Council and the Provost's Office. The primary responsibility for determining a student's completion of a certificate program shall rest in the academic department or program or the Extended Learning program area in which the certificate program is housed. The appropriate program head, upon review of the student’s transcript, shall make an endorsement of the completion of a certificate program. This endorsement, together with a listing of the program requirements to be met and a transcript showing that they have been met, shall be forwarded, as appropriate, to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies or the Director of Extended Learning for review and formal awarding of the certificate on behalf of the program area offering the program and in the name of the University. All certificates must state the number of units required for completion of the program. Notification of the award of the certificate shall be forwarded, upon completion of the program, by the appropriate dean to the Office of Admissions and Records for recording on the student's transcript and filing in the student's permanent file.

The Curriculum Review and Approval Committee shall be charged with the review and approval of proposed and revised certificate programs. Certificate programs shall be subject to review in conjunction with the five-year academic review of the program, department, college, and/or division in which the certificate is housed.

VII.  Timeline for implementation of this policy

A.  Undergraduate Students

Students who began their studies at San Francisco State University, at another California State University, or at a California community college prior to the approval of this policy and who maintain continuous enrollment can choose to satisfy either the requirements in effect when they began their studies (for university-wide requirements) and when they declared their major, concentration, minor, or certificate (for major, concentration, minor, or certificate requirements), or those in effect when they apply for the degree, major, concentration, minor, or certificate.

Students who begin their studies at San Francisco State University, at another California State University, or at a California community college, after the conversion date or who have not maintained continuous enrollment before the conversion date must satisfy the requirements specified in this policy or any revised requirements in effect before they begin their studies.
 
All students who submit a graduation application after the starting date may elect to satisfy the graduation requirements specified in this policy.
 
For the purpose of describing the implementation of this policy, “starting date” is defined as the date that the President approves this policy and “conversion date” is defined as the date that the Academic Senate reports to the Provost and President that sufficient courses have been approved to satisfy the requirements of this policy. “Continuous enrollment” is defined as matriculated attendance in at least one semester or two quarters each calendar year.
 

B.  Current Major, Concentration, Minor, and Certificate Programs

Within two years of the approval of this policy, all academic entities that offer major, concentration, minor, and certificate programs must submit a report to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies demonstrating compliance with this policy, including any exceptions to this policy approved by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Programs will also be required to demonstrate compliance at the time of Program Review.

C.  Approval of new programs

Once this policy is approved, all proposals to revise current or establish new major programs, concentrations, minor, or certificates must demonstrate compliance with this policy or obtain an exception to this policy from the Dean of Undergraduate Studies before the proposal can be approved.

VIII.  Implications for Existing Curriculum and Governance Policies

Upon approval and full implementation, elements of existing San Francisco State University policies that conflict with this policy shall be superseded.

S77-016           Indication of concentration and minor on transcripts

F79-050           Undergraduate Minor Program

F80-063           Procedures for Submitting Proposals for New Options, Certificate Programs, Concentrations, Special Emphases, & Minors

S81-075           Interdisciplinary Minors

S84-082           Major in the Bachelor of Art Degree & in the Bachelor of Science Degree

F84-125           Requirement in U.S. History & Government

F85-135           Regulations for Meeting Graduation Requirements

S87-088           Certificate Program Guidelines

S91-170           Guiding Principles for Review and Approval of New or Revised Courses

S92-179           Multicultural Perspectives in the Curriculum

S99-207           Basic Information Competence Requirement

F05-064           General Education Program Policy Consolidation (This document consolidates all previously approved policies, amendments, and revisions of the GE policy dating from 1977 through 2001: S77-15, F80-64, S81-73, S82-91, S85-132, S88-64, F88-157, S89-162, S93-107, S99-64, S01-01 (Segment II Revision), S01-02 (Segment III Revision), F81-081.)