Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees, Majors, Concentrations, Minors, and Certificates And Appendices (CURRENT)

Reference Number: S19-255
Senate Approval Date: Tuesday, February 19, 2019
Presidential Approval Date: 
Thursday, March 14, 2019

Policy #:                       S19-255

Supersedes:                 S18-255

Senate Approval:     05/07/2019    

Presidential Approval:  5/30/2019

Effective:                      Fall 2019

Last Review:                 Fall 2019

Next Review:                 Fall 2024

 

 

Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees, Majors, Concentrations, Minors, and Certificates

 

Rationale

The purpose of this revision is to bring SF State’s baccalaureate requirements in compliance with Executive Order from the Chancellor’s office. Specifically, the changes to S18-255 are limited to section II of this policy and the associated appendices, and address the following:

  • Provided the process on the Met in Major designation.
  • Added policy (section II. I) on the Maximum Credit (CR) unit Requirement; capped at 24 units.
  • Capped the minimum upper division unit requirement to 30 units (from 40 units).
  • Added language regarding the upper division requirement in major.
  • Made changes to the requirements for minor programs; require all minor programs to have 6 units of upper division (no exceptions).
  • Added language regarding the advisory role that CWEP plays in lower division certification.
  • Updated the process that takes place after BRC makes changes to this policy (forward recommendations to EPC and Senate for approval).
  • Updated language on the process for overseeing changes in major, minor, certificates (specifically on the different entities involved in approving changes).
  • Fixed some minor errors.

 

Key Words

General Education, EO 1100, EO 1110, Area E, Area A4, Baccalaureate Requirements

 

Author/Source

Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC), Educational Policies Council

 

Responsible Unit

Division of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning, Director of General Education

 

 

History

Version

Approved

Revisions(s)

10

 

S19-255

  • Provided the process on the Met in Major designation.
  • Added policy (section II. I) on the Maximum Credit (CR) unit Requirement; capped at 24 units.
  • Capped the minimum upper division unit requirement to 30 units (from 40 units).
  • Added language regarding the upper division requirement in major.
  • Made changes to the requirements for minor programs; require all minor programs to have 6 units of upper division (no exceptions).
  • Added language regarding the advisory role that CWEP plays in lower division certification.
  • Updated the process that takes place after BRC makes changes to this policy (forward recommendations to EPC and Senate for approval).
  • Updated language on the process for overseeing changes in major, minor, certificates (specifically on the different entities involved in approving changes).
  • Fixed some minor errors.

9

3/14/2019

S19-255

  • Eliminate Area C3 and fold its requirements and courses into Area C2.
  • Clarify stretch English and math courses.

8

05/01/2018

S18-255

  • Bringing policy into compliance with Chancellor’s office executive order (EO 1100 revised) by removing Area A4 and adding 3-unit Area E requirement.
  • Add First Year Experience requirement across A2 and Area E.
  • Add written composition requirement in Area E.
  • Change title of Dean of Undergraduate Studies to Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning.
  • Academic Senate has sole authority to approve changes to the appendices

7

03/07/2017

S17-255

  • Added requirement that BRC present changes to the appendices to the Senate as an information item.
  • Minimum grade requirement in Area A1-3 and B4 is lowered to a C- or better. CR grades are allowed.

6

5/12/2015

S15-255

  • Name of Overlay requirements changed to SF Studies
  • Minimum grade requirement in Area A1-3 and B4 is raised to a C or better. CR grades are no longer allowed.

5

3/11/2015

S15-255

  • Topical Perspectives option removed from upper division GE

4

01/13/2014

S14-255

  • Changed minimum grade in Area A and B4 to a C- or better.
  • The C2/C3 labels for Humanities and Humanities: Literature were switched to be consistent with community college designations

3

11/7/2013

F13-255

  • The structures of the LDCC and UDCC were modified to require two representatives from each College
  • Since the Liberal Studies program is housed in LCA and no longer within the Division of Undergraduate Studies, no separate Liberal Studies representative will be elected to BRC

2

02/17/2011

S11-255

  • Reduced number of initial certification committees

1

10/5/2010

F10-255

  • Original

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

  1. Introduction............................................................................................................................................ 2
  2. General Education and other requirements common to all Baccalaureate Degrees..................................... 3
  1. Methods of satisfying general education and other degree requirements.......................................... 3

B.General Education Requirements.................................................................................................. 3

C.Structure for Upper-Division General Education (UDGE)................................................................. 5

D.American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Requirement....................................................................... 6

E.Environmental Sustainability Requirement...................................................................................... 6

F.Global Perspectives Requirement.................................................................................................. 6

G.Social Justice Requirement........................................................................................................... 6

H.Minimum Grade-point Average Requirement.................................................................................. 6

I.Maximum Credit (CR) unit Requirement......................................................................................... 6

J.Residency Requirement................................................................................................................ 7

K.Minimum Credit-hour Requirement................................................................................................ 7

L.Minimum Upper-division Credit-hour Requirement.......................................................................... 7

M.Written English Requirements....................................................................................................... 7

N.First-Year Experience Requirement............................................................................................... 7

III.Majors.................................................................................................................................................... 7

A.Requirements and Restrictions of all Major Programs..................................................................... 7

B.Requirements and Restrictions Specific to Bachelor of Science Degree Programs............................ 8

C.Requirements and Restrictions Specific to Bachelor of Music Degree Programs............................... 9

D.Requirements and Restrictions Specific to Bachelor of Arts Degree Programs.................................. 9

IV.Minors.................................................................................................................................................... 9

A.Definitions of Minors..................................................................................................................... 9

B.Prerequisites................................................................................................................................ 9

C.Criteria for Minors....................................................................................................................... 10

V.Certificates........................................................................................................................................... 10

A.Definition of Undergraduate Certificates....................................................................................... 10

B.Prerequisites.............................................................................................................................. 10

C.Criteria for Undergraduate Certificates......................................................................................... 11

VI.Oversight and Approval Process for Baccalaureate degrees, majors, concentrations, minors, & certificates 11

A.Oversight and Approval Process for University-Wide Requirements............................................... 11

  1. Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC).................................................................. 11
  2. Initial Certification Committees............................................................................................ 13
  3. Lower Division Certification Committee (LDCC)................................................................... 14
  4. Upper Division Certification Committee (UDCC)................................................................... 16

B.Oversight and Approval Process for Major/Concentration Programs............................................... 17

C.Oversight and Approval Process for Minor Programs.................................................................... 18

D.Oversight and Approval Process for Certificate Programs.............................................................. 19

VII.Timeline for implementation of this policy................................................................................................ 21

A.Undergraduate Students............................................................................................................. 21

B.Current Major, Concentration, Minor, and Certificate Programs...................................................... 21

C.Approval of New Programs.......................................................................................................... 21

VIII.Implications for Existing Curriculum and Governance Policies................................................................ 22

Policy

 

Introduction

 

This document delineates the components, expectations, philosophy, and requirements of Baccalaureate Degrees and Certificates awarded by San Francisco State University. It is intended to provide understanding and guidance to those who are charged with the responsibility for creating, maintaining, approving, and evaluating undergraduate curriculum; and to provide specific identification of the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of Science, majors, minors, and certificates awarded by San Francisco State University. This document replaces or amends several policy documents approved by the Academic Senate and President of San Francisco State University from 1977 through 2017; the policies attenuated or superseded by this document are identified in section VIII.

 

In the fall of 2005, the Academic Senate created the Graduation Requirements Task Force (GRTF) and called for an assessment of the appropriateness and value of the university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements currently required of all San Francisco State University undergraduate students (Academic Senate Policy #F05-237, p. 1). This assessment and the GRTFs development of new undergraduate degree requirements reflect the significant changes in both faculty and curriculum that have occurred since 1981, the last time a similar comprehensive review had been undertaken at San Francisco State University. The GRTF considered the kind of preparation required for success in the twenty-first century, the needs of the communities we serve, and the primary values and character of our university that we hoped our baccalaureate students would take with them. Each recommendation made by the GRTF was reviewed in light of the educational goals, desires to integrate values and skills across requirements, faculty interests and expertise, and various practical considerations given our large and diverse student body. The review process included self-studies, an external review, extensive consultations on and off campus, multiple proposals, anonymous surveys, formal and informal feedback, and revisions.

 

After extensive consultation and revisions, the GRTF submitted a statement of Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University to the Academic Senate for its review; the Academic Senate endorsed those educational goals on March 11, 2008 (see Appendix A). The educational goals, as well as best practices identified through the review process, informed the GRTFs development of a set of recommendations regarding specific degree requirements, course expectations, student learning outcomes, majors, minors, and certificates. Those recommendations, and the educational philosophy upon which they are built, are described in the GRTFs final report, Graduation Requirements Task Force (GRTF) Recommendations: Baccalaureate Degree Requirements at San Francisco State University, submitted on November 20, 2009, to the Academic Senate. The GRTF report succinctly explains the components, expectations, and philosophy of a San Francisco State University baccalaureate degree. Elements of that report are included in the appendices. The report itself should also be considered as a general reference to assist the reader in fully understanding this policy document.

 

General Education and other requirements common to all Baccalaureate Degrees

 

All baccalaureate degree programs include university-wide requirements as articulated in the following categories:

  • General Education, including US/California History/Government requirements
  • American Ethnic and Racial Minorities requirement
  • Environmental Sustainability requirement
  • Global Perspectives requirement
  • Social Justice requirement
  • Minimum grade-point average requirements
  • Residence requirement
  • Minimum credit-hour requirement
  • Minimum upper-division credit-hour requirement
  • Written English requirements

The specific requirements for each category are described in the appendices following several

statements on how these requirements may be satisfied.

 

In addition, baccalaureate degrees may be awarded by San Francisco State University when students in addition satisfy the two following requirements:

  • For B.A. degrees, complementary studies requirement
  • Specialized (major) program of study requirements

A student’s diploma and transcript shall indicate the major, concentration, minor, certificate, and complementary studies earned by the student. The student’s transcript may also list other accomplishments, such as hours of community service learning classes, as approved by the Academic Senate and President.

 

  1. Methods of satisfying general education and other degree requirements

 

  1. SF State Studies

Requirements that are referred to as SF State Studies may be fulfilled by any course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that carries the designation. Because an SF State Studies course may fulfill more than one requirement, such courses may be completed without taking additional units. A single course may fulfill more than one university-wide requirement and may be listed in more than one place, if it meets course expectations and student learning outcomes for the specified requirement. Courses that satisfy the SF State Studies requirements must be a minimum of 3 units.

 

  1. Unlimited Double Counting and Met in Major designation

Double counting refers to the process of allowing a single course or completion of a major to satisfy multiple requirements. Provided a course meets the specified course expectations and student learning outcomes for the designated requirements, students may count the same course for any of the following: multiple university-wide requirements, major requirements, minor requirements, certificate requirements, or complementary studies requirements. Double counting to fulfill requirements does not multiply the number of units earned. In addition, major programs may apply for a Met in Major designation to have specified university-wide and /or general education requirements fulfilled by completing the major and/or two or more courses within the major.

 

 

  1. Transfer Students

Transfer students may complete the 39 units of lower division university-wide requirements, SF State Studies requirements, and lower-division courses in a major, minor, or certificate program, at another campus, if those units have been approved through an approved articulation system or an approved evaluation process regardless of modality in which they were taught. Once a GE requirement is satisfied, students shall not be required to satisfy it again regardless of changing campus or major. Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) students shall not be required to take any lower-division GE courses at SF State. Transfer students who do not complete SF State Studies requirements elsewhere will have to complete them at San Francisco State University.

 

B.General Education Requirements

 

The list of general education requirements that follows is consistent with the educational goals found in Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University, endorsed by the Academic Senate on March 11, 2008; and requirements mandated in Executive Order 1100 Revised, CSU General Education Breadth Requirements, which governs general education requirements in the California State University system. Area designations below (i.e., A-E) correspond to areas specified in Executive Order 1100 Revised. The subject area distinctions of EO represent domains of knowledge with varying methods of inquiry instead of categories that can be defined by college, department, or program designations. Courses that meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes identified for an area will be approved for that area (see Appendices), regardless of the disciplinary designation of the program making the proposal. As of Fall 2018, to maintain general education status, all General Education courses shall be offered within a 5-year period.

 

All students who earn baccalaureate degrees at San Francisco State University must complete 48-49 units (39-40 lower division and 9 upper division) of General Education coursework. The courses taken to fulfill these 48 units may vary for transfer students and students who begin their studies at San Francisco State University, but both types of students must complete the requirements specified in Tables 1 and 2.

 

The minimum grade for satisfying the General Education requirement in courses approved for oral communication (A1), written communication (A2), critical thinking (A3), and quantitative reasoning (B4) shall be C-. In any situation, wherein a substitution has been allowed for these courses, such substitution whether it be for an individual or a program shall also be passed at the level of C- or higher in order to satisfy the General Education requirement.

 

Given that the SFSU definition of a CR grade is a C- or better, a grade of a CR will fulfill the General Education requirements for the above listed areas. This requirement will go into effect for all students in A1, A2, A3 and B4 courses taken beginning Fall 2018, regardless of the Bulletin year for a given student.

 

Skills assessment and recommended placement for general education written communication and mathematics/quantitative reasoning shall be based on multiple measures of academic proficiency as defined by the Chancellor’s Office.

 

First-year students should enroll in general education written communication and mathematics/quantitative reasoning courses appropriate to each student’s major and skill level, during the first academic year, unless the requirement has been completed. Sufficient course sections shall be offered to meet student enrollment needs.

 

Students whose skills assessments indicate academic support will be needed for successful completion of general education written communication or mathematics/ quantitative reasoning courses shall enroll in appropriate college-level, baccalaureate credit-bearing courses that strengthen skills development to facilitate achieving the appropriate general education student learning outcomes. Supportive course models may include, among others, co-requisite approaches, supplemental instruction, or two-semester "stretch" courses where the second semester course satisfies the A2 or/and B4 requirement.

 

Appeals/exceptions can be directed to the Office of Developmental Studies.

 

Table 1: General Education Requirements of all baccalaureate degrees.

Requirement

Level1

Units

EO 1065 Area Designation

Oral Communication

LD

3

A

Written Communication/First-Year Experience I

LD

3

A

Critical Thinking

LD

3

A

Physical Science

LD

3

B

Life Science

LD

3

B

Lab Science2

LD

1

B

Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning

LD

3

B

Arts

LD

3

C

Humanities

LD

3

C

Arts or Humanities3

LD

3

C

Social Sciences

LD

3

D

Social Sciences: US History

LD

3

D

Social Sciences: US & CA Government

LD

3

D

Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (LLD)/First-Year Experience II

LD

3

E

Physical and/or Life Science

UD

3

B

Arts and/or Humanities

UD

3

C

Social Sciences

UD

3

D

  1. LD = lower division; UD = upper division
  2. A 3-unit physical or life science course that includes a 1-unit laboratory component satisfies both the 3-unit physical or life science requirement and the 1-unit lab science requirement.

 

 

Table 2: Other Graduation Requirements1

Requirement

Level

Units

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement

UD

3-4

American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM)2

LD or UD

3

Environmental Sustainability (ES)2

LD or UD

3

Global Perspectives (GP)2

LD or UD

3

Social Justice (SJ)2

LD or UD

3

Complementary Studies

BA degrees

12-16

  1. The unit requirement may be satisfied by either an independent course or a course that also satisfies a general education or major requirement.
  2. AERM, ES, GP and SJ are collectively termed SF State Studies requirements.

 

 

 

C.Structure for Upper-Division General Education (UDGE)

All students, including transfer students, must complete a total of nine units with the equivalent of one course in each of the following CSU-mandated groupings of domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences (UD-B), (2) arts and/or humanities (UD-C), and (3) social sciences (UD-D). Students may also choose to complete the Upper-Division General Education Requirement through Integrated Studies or Study Abroad. The 9-unit, Upper-Division GE course requirement is designed to be taken after completing 60 semester units. As of Fall 2018, however, UDGE shall be taken after completion of oral and written communication, critical thinking, and mathematics/quantitative reasoning requirements.

 

  1. UDGE Disciplinary Perspectives

(9 units minimum; must be taken in residence at a CSU campus)

 

Upper-division General Education (UDGE) is rooted in the educational goals for baccalaureate degrees at San Francisco State University. Students must complete one course in each of the following groupings of domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences. Faculty teaching an upper division general education course from one of these domains (e.g. sciences, arts, humanities, or social sciences), are encouraged to draw connections to the others as appropriate. Each course will be designed to meet six student learning outcomes for the designated domain of knowledge and inquiry (see Appendix H.

 

  1. Integrated Studies Option

Students must complete three courses that have been devised by a faculty team into a coherent, integrative program of study; one course in each of the following groupings of domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences. In order to receive credit for the Upper Division General Education Requirement through the Integrated Studies Option, students must complete a minimum of 9 units on the same theme. (Courses must also meet the course expectations for upper division general education courses indicated earlier. Though the courses must be open to students from any major, the courses can be restricted to cohorts of students taking a particular set of integrated courses.)

  1. Study Abroad Option

Courses used to meet the upper division general education requirements through Study Abroad must be approved through the GE petition process. The courses used to meet the upper division general education requirement must be selected in the three CSU-mandated domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences. One to three of the courses may be completed abroad, with any remaining course(s) being completed at San Francisco State University, if necessary to equal at least nine units.

 

D.American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Requirement

 

All students must earn a passing or better grade (or CR) in a course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated as an American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) course.

 

The student learning outcomes and course expectations for American Ethnic and Racial Minorities courses are described in the GRTF final report (see Appendix D).

E.Environmental Sustainability Requirement

 

All students must earn a passing or better grade (or CR) in a course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated as an Environmental Sustainability (ES) course.

 

The student learning outcomes and course expectations for Environmental Sustainability courses are described in the GRTF final report (see Appendix E).

 

F.Global Perspectives Requirement

 

All students must earn a passing or better grade (or CR) in a course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated as a Global Perspectives (GP) course.

 

The student learning outcomes and course expectations for Global Perspectives courses are described in the GRTF final report (see Appendix F).

 

G.Social Justice Requirement

 

All students must earn a passing or better grade (or CR) in a course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated as a Social Justice (SJ) course. The student learning outcomes and course expectations for Social Justice courses are described in the GRTF final report (see Appendix G).

 

H.Minimum Grade-point Average Requirement

 

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.00 for all coursework used to satisfy degree requirements; a GPA of at least 2.00 for all coursework completed at San Francisco State University; and a GPA of at least 2.00 for all coursework used to satisfy the major or concentration requirements. Further, to be awarded a minor, a student must have a GPA of at least 2.00 for all coursework used to satisfy the minor requirements.

 

 

I.Maximum Credit (CR) units

 

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students may have a maximum of 24 units of CR units taken at SFSU.  Major courses that are offered only as CR/NC are not to be included in the 24 unit max count. 

 

J.Residency Requirement

 

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have completed at least 30 units at San Francisco State University, including at least 24 upper-division units. All students must complete the nine units of upper-division general education requirements at a CSU campus. At least 12 units of courses used to complete major or concentration requirements must be completed in residence at San Francisco State University.

 

K.Minimum Credit-hour Requirement

 

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have completed at least 120 semester units. These credits may have been earned at SFSU or at another institution, if that credit has been transferred to and approved by San Francisco State University.

 

L.Minimum Upper-division Credit-hour Requirement

 

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have completed at least 40 30 semester units of upper-division courses. Transfer students in externally accredited Bachelor of Science in Nursing program may be exempt from this requirement.

 

M.Written English Requirements

 

To be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have earned a C- or better grade in Written English Communication and have satisfied the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR).  For details, see the policy on Written English Proficiency, #S16-014.

 

N.First-Year Experience Requirement

 

As of Fall 2019, all students at SFSU are required to complete a First-Year Experience (FYE), which at SFSU is met in Areas A2 and E of general education.  Completion of Area A2 or its equivalent is a pre-requisite to the Area E course.  The student learning outcomes and course expectations for First-Year Experience courses are described in Appendix C.

 

Majors
 

B.Requirements and Restrictions of all Major Programs

 

  1. Educational Goals

At the time of creation, revision, and program review, major programs must provide information about how they are contributing to at least four of the university’s six educational goals: (1) Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor, (2) Intellectual Attainments, (3) Appreciation of Diversity, (4) Ethical Engagement, (5) Integration and Application of Knowledge, and (6) Qualities of Mind and Spirit.

 

  1. Prerequisites

Major programs must comply with the following prerequisite rules and the requisite disclosures must appear in the University Bulletin:

  • If a program does not name specific courses but does establish that a university-wide requirement (e.g. upper or lower division writing, quantitative reasoning, etc.) must be met as a prerequisite, those prerequisites are not counted in the major.
  • If a program requires students to take specific courses as prerequisites, even if these also meet university-wide requirements, those courses must be listed and counted as units required in the major.
  • If a program requires students to take general prerequisites in addition to university-wide requirements (e.g. first-year foreign language, a course in world history, etc.) those prerequisites must be listed and counted as units required in the major.
  • Prerequisites that might be met through prior experiences (e.g., high school courses, AP credit, heritage language experiences, etc.) must be identified.
  • If the number of units required in a program varies based on different course options or prerequisites for those options, the major program must clearly explain the variation in units.

 

  1. Lower and Upper Division Classes

Major programs are recommended to include at least 6 units of lower-division credit Major B.A. programs are required to have a minimum of 12 units of upper division and B.S. major program must have a minimum of 18 units in the upper division. 

 

  1. Writing in the Major

Major programs must require that majors complete a GWAR (Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement) course. In addition, major programs should provide intensive experiences, as defined by the program, at the senior level.

 

  1. Technology Related to the Major

Major programs must include curriculum appropriate instruction, as defined by the program, in the technologies most relevant to the major. This may occur in a single course or multiple courses. Courses providing this instruction may be housed in the major program or elsewhere, but major programs should ensure their majors receive this instruction.

 

  1. High Impact Educational Practices

At the time of program review, major programs will be asked which of the following high impact educational practices they provide their major programs, the nature of those practices, and what they know about the effectiveness of such practices for their major programs: (1) first-year seminars and experiences, (2) common intellectual experiences, (3) learning communities, (4) writing-intensive courses, (5) collaborative assignments and projects, (6) undergraduate research, (7) diversity/global learning, (8) service learning, community-based learning, (9) internships, and (10) capstone courses and projects. A summary description of these practices can be found in the GRTF Final Report.

 

  1. Flexibility and Advising

Major programs are encouraged, but not required, to offer students multiple options for completing requirements, when appropriate to do so, and review prerequisites with consideration for what lower-division students and first-semester transfer students would be able to take. Major programs are also encouraged to include on their websites documents students can use to plan the completion of their major.

 

  1. Culminating Experiences

A culminating experience will be required of all students as part of all major programs. Departments and programs will design and implement capstone courses or other culminating experiences for major students at the senior level by Fall 2015. Maximum flexibility will be given to programs and departments in the design of these courses or other experiences, so long as they fulfill the spirit of the culminating experience concept.

 

Definition: The culminating experience requires students nearing the end of their college years to create a project that integrates and applies what they have learned. The project might be a research paper, a performance, a portfolio of best work, or an exhibit. It might be attached to a formal course for credit, or might not.  Culminating experiences should offer some hands- on element such as internship, study abroad, application of learned skills, or research within the field. The following additional recommendations pertain:

  • Ideally, the culminating experience will integrate learning from the general education program and major as well as co-curricular activities.
  • It is further recommended that it include a significant writing component appropriate to the discipline.
  • The culminating experience may be designed as either individual or collaborative courses or projects.

Departments shall self-evaluate their culminating experience requirements at each program review.

 

C.Requirements and Restrictions Specific to Bachelor of Science Degree Programs

 

Minimum and maximum number of units – ordinarily, Bachelor of Science major programs may not require less than 40 nor more than 70 units for completion of the major. It is expected that students will have some electives they can choose themselves within the 120 units needed for the degree. Major programs seeking to exceed the unit limits may request an exception on the basis of major requirements also completing other requirements (e.g., university-wide requirements or complementary studies (see below), accreditation requirements, or some other significant justification.)

 

D.Requirements and Restrictions Specific to Bachelor of Music Degree Programs

 

Minimum and maximum number of units – ordinarily Bachelor of Music major programs require 70 units for completion of the major. It is expected that students will have some electives they can choose themselves within the 120 units needed for the degree. Major programs seeking to exceed the unit limits may request an exception on the basis of major requirements also completing other requirements (e.g., university-wide requirements or complementary studies (see below), accreditation requirements, or some other significant justification.)

 

E.Requirements and Restrictions Specific to Bachelor of Arts Degree Programs

 

  1. Minimum and Maximum Number of Units

Ordinarily, Bachelor of Arts major programs may not require less than 24 nor more than 45 units for completion of the major. It is expected that students will have some electives they can choose themselves within the 120 units needed for the degree. Major programs seeking to exceed the unit limits may request an exception on the basis of major requirements also completing other requirements (e.g., university-wide requirements or complementary studies (see below), accreditation requirements, or some other significant justification.)

 

  1. Complementary Studies Requirement for Majors in BA Degree Programs

Bachelor of Arts students must complete at least twelve units of complementary studies outside of the primary prefix for the major. Complementary studies units may come from languages other than English, minors, certificates, or a coherent group of courses approved by a major advisor as complementary to the major. With the approval of an advisor in the major, courses that fulfill complementary studies units may be lower or upper division units, resident or transfer units, or units taken in approved study abroad programs. B.A. programs may decide how many, if any, of the complementary units may be counted in the major, and they may designate specific courses to be taken for complementary studies credit or they may develop advising protocols to guide students through this process. Students who complete two majors or a major and a minor automatically complete the complementary studies requirement. Complementary studies units may be included in the maximum units allowed for B.A. degrees (i.e., 45 units) or they may be in addition to that maximum (i.e., 45 units in the major plus 12 additional units in complementary studies.) If complementary studies units are listed as part of the major, the maximum for this combined total is 57 units.

           

Major programs submit their descriptions of complementary studies for their majors for review and approval by the Curriculum Review and Approval Committee. These descriptions will also be evaluated as part of the program review process as programs come up for review.

                       

Examples of complementary studies requirements can be found in Appendix I. Students earning Bachelor of Music or Bachelor of Science degrees do not have to complete the complementary studies requirement.

 

Minors

F.Definitions of Minors

 

A minor is an area of specialized academic training, disciplinary or interdisciplinary in character, which is typically undertaken by a degree candidate in order to supplement or complement the major field of study, or to provide academic training in a minor subject or alternative field of study.  In comparison to a major field of study, the disciplinary minor is generally more narrow or restricted in scope while the interdisciplinary minor will typically exhibit a broader area of subject coverage.  In both instances, fewer course credits are required than in the major field of study.

 

G.Prerequisites

 

Minors must comply with the following prerequisite rules and the requisite disclosures must appear in the University Bulletin:

  • If a program does not name specific courses but does establish that a university-wide requirement (e.g. upper or lower division writing, quantitative reasoning, lower division art, etc.) must be met as a prerequisite, those prerequisites are not counted in the minor.
  • If a program requires students to take specific courses as prerequisites, even if these also meet university-wide requirements, those courses must be listed and counted as units required in the minor.
  • If a program requires students to take general prerequisites in addition to university-wide requirements (e.g. first year foreign language, a course in world history, etc.) those prerequisites must be listed and counted as units required in the minor.
  • Prerequisites that might be met through prior experiences (e.g., high school courses, AP credit, heritage language experiences, etc.) must be identified.
  • If the number of units required in a program varies based on different course options or prerequisites for those options, the minor program must clearly explain the variation in units.

 

H.Criteria for Minors

  • The program is to consist of a minimum of 12 semester units and a maximum of 24 units.
  • Credit by examination is permitted in accordance with established university regulations.
  • All course work used to satisfy the requirements of a minor must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
  • Every minor must require at least 6 upper division units.
  • Normally, no more than one-half of the units used to meet the requirements for the minor may be transfer units.
  • A maximum of three units in the minor may be devoted to internships and/or independent study unless a specific exception has been granted in advance.
  • All courses that meet the requirements of a minor may be used, as appropriate, simultaneously to meet requirements in general education, credentials, certificates, or complementary studies.
  • The curriculum in minor programs must contribute to at least four of the six goals described in Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University and minor programs must provide information in their program reviews about how they are contributing to those goals.
  • Students may not complete a major and minor in the same discipline (i.e., within the same HEGIS code).

 

Certificates

 

I.Definition of Undergraduate Certificates

 

A certificate program is a coherent set of academic courses that does not lead to a degree, but is focused on a substantial area of study that may be practically oriented toward skills and/or occupations. Certificate programs are an additional way of organizing curriculum in order to serve matriculated students or students who wish to spend a limited time in college in order to learn specific subjects, concepts, skills and competencies. Certificate programs shall not infringe upon existing majors in degree programs. Since minor programs do not lead to degrees, however, some minor programs may, of themselves, constitute certificate programs, and some certificate programs may be subsumed within a minor. The award of a certificate means that the holder has completed the required course work at a certain level of academic accomplishment. A certificate indicates to a prospective employer that the University validates the particular program of study. It neither credentials nor licenses the student, nor does it guarantee the ability of the student to put into practice what has been studied.

 

J.Prerequisites

Certificates must comply with the following prerequisite rules and the requisite disclosures must appear in the University Bulletin:

 

  • If a program does not name specific courses but does establish that a university-wide requirement (e.g. upper or lower division writing, quantitative reasoning, lower division art, etc.) must be met as a prerequisite, those prerequisites are not counted in the certificate.
  • If a program requires students to take specific courses as prerequisites, even if these also meet university-wide requirements, those courses must be listed and counted as units required in the certificate.
  • If a program requires students to take general prerequisites in addition to university-wide requirements (e.g. first year foreign language, a course in world history, etc.) those prerequisites must be listed and counted as units required in the certificate.
  • Prerequisites that might be met through prior experiences (e.g., high school courses, AP credit, heritage language experiences, etc.) must be identified.
  • If the number of units required in a program varies based on different course options or prerequisites for those options, the certificate program must clearly explain the variation in units.

 

K.Criteria for Undergraduate Certificates

  • Undergraduate certificate programs require a minimum of 12 semester units.
  • Credit by examination is permitted in accordance with established university regulations.
  • All course work used to satisfy the requirements of an undergraduate certificate must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
  • Normally, no more than one-half of the units used to meet the requirements for the certificate may be transfer units.
  • A maximum of three units in the certificate may be devoted to internships and/or independent study unless a specific exception has been granted in advance.
  • All courses for meeting the requirements of a certificate may be used, as appropriate, simultaneously to meet requirements in general education, credentials, or complementary studies.
  • Before completing any certificate, students must demonstrate an appropriate level of writing competency. The appropriate level shall be determined by the program proposers in consultation with the Committee on Written English Proficiency. Each certificate program proposal must specify how the above steps are to be accomplished.
  • Matriculated students may complete certificates while enrolled in degree programs. Non- matriculated students may complete certificates through Open University or the College of Extended Learning.

 

Oversight and Approval Process for Baccalaureate degrees, majors, concentrations, minors, and certificates

 

L.Oversight and Approval Process for University-Wide Requirements

 

The Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) will oversee all activities related to university-wide degree requirements, including the approval process for courses to be certified as satisfying any university-wide requirements. The approval process for courses to be certified as satisfying any university-wide requirements involves two different committee structures: Seven temporary Initial Certification Committees will be established to carry out the initial certification of courses that satisfy general education and SF State Study requirements. When the BRC has determined that the initial certification process is completed, it will inform the Academic Senate that the seven initial certification committees should be dissolved and that two permanent committees, the Lower Division Certification Committee (LDCC) and the Upper Division Certification Committee (UDCC), should be established. The charge and membership of these committees are described below.

 

Proposals to establish new and to revise existing courses to satisfy the course expectations and student learning outcomes described in this document and its appendices must comply with Academic Senate policy #S91-170, Guiding Principles for Review and Approval of New or Revised Courses.

 

  1. Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC)
  1. Committee Charge

The Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) will be responsible for developing, reviewing, recommending, and publicizing the policies, principles and procedures, and guidelines that govern university-wide requirements for baccalaureate degrees. The BRC will respond to and initiate adjustments in program principles, course expectations, student learning outcomes, and the program curriculum as changing times and needs indicate.

 

The BRC will submit its decisions and recommendations to the Academic Senate, the Provost, and the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning. Upon final approval, the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning, in cooperation with the BRC, will facilitate the implementation of program policies, procedures, guidelines, and agreed upon curricular adjustments and will ensure that all areas within university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements are responsibly and adequately represented. Members of the BRC will:

  • Review all policies, procedures, reviews, approvals, implementations and disseminations related to university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements;
  • recommend changes in policies related to university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements to the Academic Senate;
  • monitor and review recommendations and reports made by the established university- wide baccalaureate degree requirements subcommittees;
  • manage the terms of service and work distribution between the initial and continuing university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements subcommittees;
  • initiate the selection of university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements subcommittees;
  • act as a board of appeals on all policy and procedural matters related to university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements;
  • act as the final faculty committee for review of course proposals for university-wide requirements for baccalaureate degrees and make its recommendations through the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning to the Provost;
  • request data, reports, and information from the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning regarding all aspects of implementing, delivering, and evaluating university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements;
  • review recommendations and reports submitted at least annually by the Director of Advising;
  • have primary responsibility for increasing campus awareness and understanding of baccalaureate requirements.
  • propose changes to the Baccalaureate Requirements policy (S18-255), including the appendices to the policy, after consultation with the Educational Policies Council (EPC) and with programs impacted by the proposed changes. All agreed upon changes will be voted on by the EPC and brought to Senate for approval.
  1. Committee Membership

The Baccalaureate Requirements Committee shall be composed of the following members:

Voting Members

  • One college representative elected from and by the faculty
  • ne faculty representative from the Library elected by librarians.
  • One representative selected from the Advising Center professional staff by the director of the Undergraduate Advising Center.
  • One representative selected from the Student Affairs area professional staff by the associate vice president for Student Affairs.
  • One student representative selected by the Associated Students Board of Directors. One representative appointed by the Academic Senate.

Nonvoting Members

  • The Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning or the Dean’s designee. One representative from Enrollment Management.
  • One representative from the University Academic Assessment Advisory Committee. Chair of the Lower Division Certification Committee (LDC) or designee (information about this committee is provided in the section titled Lower Division Certification Committee below).
  • Chair of the Upper Division Certification Committee (UDC) or designee (information about this committee is provided in the section titled Upper Division Certification Committee below).
  • The faculty member serving as Director of General Education.

The Academic Senate shall notify Deans, the University Librarian, the Director of the Advising Center, and the Associated Students Governing Board when there is a vacancy in their units. Faculty members in their respective units will elect their representatives. The Advising Center, Student Affairs, and the Associated Students Governing Board shall choose a representative by their usual procedures for selecting committee members.  In the case of a vacancy within a term of service, Deans and their equivalences may appoint a replacement until the next election or selection process in that unit.

  1. Quorum

A quorum for BRC shall consist of a majority of voting members.

  1. BRC Terms of Service

All terms are for three years, except for the student and Academic Senate representatives, who shall each serve for one year. Members may be re-elected and may serve successive terms; there are no term limits. Terms of membership will not be staggered initially. If a position is vacated before a term is completed, a newly elected member will serve a full three- year term.

  1. Committee Chair

The Chair will be elected by the members of the BRC. Chairs serve a one year term that may be renewed.

  1. BRC and the Academic Senate

BRC may approve the certification and decertification of courses in consultation with the Initial, Lower Division, and Upper Division Certification committees; but recommendations for policy changes require the approval of the Academic Senate and President. When BRC wishes to make policy changes, the Chair of BRC will forward those recommendations to Educational Policies Council (EPC) and the Academic Senate. All agreed upon changes will be voted on by the EPC and brought to Senate for approval.  Chair of the BRC will make two reports each semester to the Executive Committee of the Academic Senate regarding BRCs work and will address the Academic Senate as requested by the Executive Committee of the Academic Senate.

 

  1. Initial Certification Committees

There shall be seven committees to carry out the initial certification of courses meeting university requirements at San Francisco State University. Separate committees will be constituted for review of courses for inclusion in Areas A, B, C, D, E, as well as one committee to review all courses submitted to meet one of the four SF State Studies courses (i.e. AERM, GP, Environmental Sustainability and/or SJ.). There shall be one committee to carry out the initial certification of courses for inclusion in the Topical Perspectives option (deleted as of March 10, 2015) and Integrated Study option of the upper division General Education program. (No certification committee will exist for the Study Abroad option since programs are constructed on an individual basis.)

  1. Committee Charge

The initial certification committees will evaluate and recommend to the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC; details about BRC appear in the section titled Continuing Certification and Monitoring below) course proposals for meeting university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements on the basis of how well they fulfill course expectations and student learning outcomes for those requirements. It is expected that initial certification committees will develop streamlined processes that both ensure that approved courses meet the expected learning objectives but that are not overly burdensome on those submitting proposals. The committees will also consider the overall viability of the Area, including accessibility of sufficient courses in the Area to meet student needs. The committee may consider things such as prerequisites and offering frequency and patterns when determining whether a given Area will be able to meet student demand. The committees will also review the degree to which courses within an Area, especially at the upper division level, have a sufficient number of courses which meet SF State Studies requirements to make it likely that students will have adequate access to those requirements.

 

If a committee has concerns about sufficient offerings, those concerns should be brought to the attention of the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning who will then work with College Deans to acquire sufficient offerings. Faculty may also propose to the committees, co-curricular activities to meet university-wide requirements (e.g., in a given year when the national debate topic is international in scope, the Director of the Debate Team might propose that members of the debate team get credit for the global perspectives requirement, or if the goals of a learning community are consistent with a requirement the faculty advisor might request that members of that community receive credit for that requirement).

  1. Review of Committee Recommendations

The Initial Certification Committee's reasons for recommending the disapproval of courses will be stated in writing to the BRC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes for the Area. The chair of the Initial Certification Committee is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the BRC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations.

  1. Committee Membership

The Initial Certification Committees will be composed of the following members:

  • One faculty representative from each of the colleges
  • One faculty representative from the Library
  • One Academic Advising Professional
  • One representative from the Liberal Studies Council – the committee reviewing Upper Division General Education Requirements shall instead have one representative from the University Interdisciplinary Council
  • One representative from the Associated Students (ASI)

If any of the above units do not select a representative, the committee shall be considered duly constituted as long as five members have been appointed or elected by their Colleges or Units (not including ASI). If fewer than five members have been appointed or elected, the Executive Committee of the Academic Senate will seek members from units not already represented until the minimum of five members has been reached. A quorum will be a majority of the members of the committee. If there are not enough members to staff all of the recommended committees or if the workload of any given committee is too great, the Senate Executive Committee has the authority to combine committees or add committees using the same membership principles articulated above.

  1. Committee Terms of Service

All terms are for one to three years as determined by the BRC, or until the initial certification process is complete. Terms of membership will not be staggered initially. If a position is vacated before a term is completed, a newly elected member will serve a full term.

  1. Committee Chairs

The chair of each committee will be elected by the members of the Committee.

  1. Meeting Times

In-person meeting days and times for each committee shall be set and announced in advance of elections by the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning. Faculty elected to the committees will be expected to keep those days and times available for in-person meetings. Committees will conduct as much work as possible electronically and shall meet during the scheduled time when necessary.

  1. BRC Representative

A member of the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) shall be identified to help each initial certification committee begin its work and shall be available for consultation and help as needed.

 

  1. Lower Division Certification Committee (LDCC)
  1. Committee Charge

After the initial certification period has passed, the Lower Division Certification Committee (LDCC) will be constituted. Its purpose will be to evaluate and recommend lower division courses for meeting university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements (Areas and/or SF State Studies) on the basis of how well they fulfill course expectations and student learning outcomes for those requirements. In the cases of Area A2 and Area E, the University Committee for Writing English Proficiency (UCWEP) will act in an advisory role to LDCC on writing intensive SLOs, with the final decision being with LDCC.  The Committee's reasons for recommending disapproval of any lower division course will be stated in writing to the BRC and to the appropriate department chair and college dean in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes specified for lower division courses. The LDCC will work with the University Academic Assessment Advisory Committee (UAAAC) to carry out assessment of lower division courses designated as meeting baccalaureate degree requirements on a rotating schedule to ensure their continued currency and adequacy to satisfy assessment requirements. The chair of the LDC is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the BRC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations.

  1. Committee Membership

The Lower Division Certification Committee shall be composed the following members: Voting Members

  • Two college representatives elected from and by the faculty
  • One faculty representative from the Library elected by librarians
  • One representative selected from the Advising Center professional staff by the director of the Undergraduate Advising Center
  • One student representative selected by the Associated Students Board of Directors

Nonvoting Members

  • One representative from BRC, as a nonvoting member
  • The Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning, or the Deans designee, as a nonvoting member

The Academic Senate shall notify Deans, the University Librarian, the Director of the Advising Center, and the Associated Students Governing Board when there is a vacancy in their units. Faculty members in their respective units will elect their representatives. The Advising Center and the Associated Students Governing Board shall choose a representative by their usual procedures for selecting committee members. In the case of a vacancy within a term of service, Deans and their equivalences may appoint a replacement until the next election or selection process in that unit.

  1. Quorum

A quorum shall consist of a majority of voting members.

  1. Committee Terms of Service

All terms are for three years, except for the student representative who will serve for one year. Members may be re-elected and may serve successive terms; there are no term limits. Terms of membership will not be staggered initially. If a position is vacated before a term is completed, a newly elected member will serve a full three-year term.

  1. Committee Chair

The chair will be elected by the members of the Lower Division Certification Committee and is encouraged to attend the BRC meetings as a nonvoting member of BRC.

  1. Lower Division Certification Committee Responsibilities

Members of the Lower Division Certification Committee will:

  • Recommend approval/disapproval to the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) of new and revised course proposals based on their adequacy in meeting the specified course expectations and student learning outcomes for lower-division classes designated as meeting university-wide requirements;
  • forward to BRC any dissenting opinions;
  • ensure that all approved and proposed lower-division courses continue to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes specified in the General Education policy by reviewing re-certification materials submitted to the committee on a four-year rotating schedule;
  • request consultation with faculty concerning the review of courses that fail to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes for lower-division classes designated as meeting university-wide requirements;
  • recommend to the BRC in writing its reasons for requesting deletion of courses that fail to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes for lower-division classes designated meeting university-wide requirements after consulting with all involved parties;
  • work closely with the BRC and the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning to ensure accessibility (including time of day offerings) and to resolve persistent problems in university-wide requirements;
  • implement the approved assessment plan for evaluating lower-division courses as well as the overall effectiveness of lower division courses in meeting the course expectations and student learning outcomes; and
  • constitute ad hoc committees of faculty with expertise in a particular area to provide advice.

 

  1. Upper Division Certification Committee (UDCC)
  1. Committee Charge

After the initial certification period has passed, the Upper Division Certification Committee (UDCC) will be constituted. Its purpose will be to evaluate and recommend upper division courses for meeting university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements (Areas and/or Overlays SF State Studies) on the basis of how well they fulfill course expectations and student learning outcomes for those requirements. The Committee's reasons for recommending disapproval of any upper division course will be stated in writing to the BRC and to the appropriate department chairs and college deans in terms of the stated course expectations and student learning outcomes specified for upper division courses. The UDCC will work with the University Academic Assessment Advisory Committee (UAAAC) to carry out assessment of upper division courses meeting university-wide baccalaureate degree requirements on a rotating schedule to ensure their continued currency and adequacy to satisfy requirements. The chair of the UDCC is responsible for submitting a comprehensive written report to the BRC summarizing the committee’s actions, deliberations, and recommendations.

  1. Committee Membership

The Upper Division Committee shall be composed of the following:

Voting Members

  • Two college representatives elected from and by the faculty
  • One faculty representative from the Library elected by librarians
  • One representative selected from the Advising Center professional staff by the director of the Undergraduate Advising Center
  • One student representative selected by the Associated Students Board of Directors.

Nonvoting Members

  • One representative from BRC, as a nonvoting member
  • The Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning, or the Deans designee, as a nonvoting member.

The Academic Senate shall notify Deans, the University Librarian, the Director of the Advising Center, and Associated Students Governing Board when there is a vacancy in their units. Faculty members in their respective units will elect their representatives. The Advising Center and the Associated Students Governing Board shall choose a representative by their usual procedures for selecting committee members. In the case of a vacancy within a term of service, Deans and their equivalences may appoint a replacement until the next election in that unit.

  1. Quorum
    A quorum shall consist of a majority of voting members.
  2. Committee Terms of Service

All terms are for three years, except for the student representative who will serve for one year. Members may be re-elected and serve successive terms; there are no term limits. Terms of membership will not be staggered initially. If a position is vacated before a term is completed, a newly elected member will serve a full three-year term.

  1. Committee Chair

The chair will be elected by the members of the Upper Division Certification Committee and is encouraged to attend the BRC meetings as a nonvoting member of BRC.

  1. Upper Division Certification Committee Responsibilities

Members of the Upper Division Certification Committee will:

  • Recommend approval/disapproval to the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) of new and revised course proposals based on their adequacy in meeting the specified course expectations and student learning outcomes for upper-division classes designated as meeting university-wide requirements;
  • forward to BRC any dissenting opinions;
  • ensure that all approved and proposed upper-division courses continue to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes specified in the General Education policy by reviewing re-certification materials submitted to the committee on a four-year rotating schedule;
  • request consultation with faculty concerning the review of courses that fail to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes for upper-division classes designated as meeting university-wide requirements;
  • recommend to the BRC in writing its reasons for requesting deletion of courses that fail to meet the course expectations and student learning outcomes for upper-division classes designated meeting university-wide requirements after consulting with all involved parties;
  • work closely with the BRC and the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning to ensure accessibility (including time of day offerings) and to resolve persistent problems in university-wide requirements;
  • implement the approved assessment plan for evaluating upper division courses as well as the overall effectiveness of upper division courses in meeting the course expectations and student learning outcomes; and
  • when necessary, constitute ad hoc committees of faculty with expertise in a particular area to provide advice.

 

M.Oversight and Approval Process for Major/Concentration Programs

New major/concentration programs are subject to review and approval by the department, college, Academic Planning, Curriculum Review and Approval Committee, Academic Senate, Provost, President, Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), and Chancellor’s Office.

 

Significant, detailed information is required for review and approval of a proposed new major program. Requests for approval of a major program should follow the format below.

 

  1. General Procedures for Proposing Major and Concentration Programs

Proposals for new major programs typically require significant information on the resources needed to offer the program and the anticipated demand for the program. Departments, Programs, Colleges, or groups of faculty who wish to develop a new major program should consult with the university curriculum coordinator very early in the planning stages to learn the requirements of and procedures to gain approval for new major programs.

 

Proposals for new concentrations that represent a bifurcation or other splitting of an existing major program usually do not require as much information as those for new major programs. Departments, Programs, Colleges, or groups of faculty who wish to develop new concentrations for existing major programs should consult with the university curriculum coordinator very early in the planning stages to learn the requirements of and procedures to gain approval for the new concentration programs.

 

Proposals to revise existing major and concentration programs should follow the steps listed below.

 

  1. General Procedures for Proposing Revisions to Major and Concentration Programs
  • Proposals ordinarily shall be initiated by Departments, Programs, or Colleges of the University, and following College approval shall be processed through the regular program review process of the University, including review by the Curriculum Review and Approval Committee, the Academic Senate, the Provost, and the President. At each level of review, the proposal may be approved, denied, or returned for additional information.
  • Proposals should be submitted in the format prescribed. Copies of the guidelines are available from the Office of the Provost.
  • The sponsoring unit (i.e., program, department, school, college, interdisciplinary area) must designate an appropriate faculty member who will be responsible for coordinating the program. As may be appropriate, this may be the department chair.
  • All officially approved major and concentration programs should be described in the University Bulletin.
  • All information circulated in connection with such programs should have the prior clearance of the appropriate college dean.
  • Upon satisfactory completion of an approved major or concentration program, including making formal application for same, the Director of Admissions and Records, or his/her designee, shall enter an appropriate designation on the student's permanent record and shall maintain annual records of the names (and numbers) of all students completing such majors or concentrations.  The Director of Admissions and Records should report to the Provost each year on the number and type of majors and concentrations completed.

 

  1. Procedures for Proposing Interdisciplinary Majors and Concentrations

 

  • A "Prospectus" is prepared on the new major or concentration to include:
  • proposed title of new major or concentration and general subject areas likely to be included in the program statement of need for and/or desirability of new major or concentration in relation to the mission of the institution;
  • expected clientele (i.e., type and numbers) for this new program;
  • a statement of resources (including library resources) which are likely to be required and a statement of impact on other programs of the University;
  • names of sponsors which must include representatives from each disciplinary area likely to be involved in offering the program.
  • The Prospectus is submitted to the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning who will be responsible for its dissemination to all College Deans for information purposes and for coordinating its review by the University Interdisciplinary Council and approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
  • Development, Approval, and Implementation of Formal Program Proposal
  • After the major or concentration is approved for inclusion in the Academic Master Plan, the University Interdisciplinary Council in consultation with the original program proposers shall designate a formal Program Committee to include as many of the original program proposers as desire to serve, plus others as appropriate;
  • Program Committee prepares curriculum of new major or concentration utilizing the general procedures for proposing majors (see above);
  • Completed program proposal is directed to appropriate College Dean for appropriate consultations and endorsements;
  • After College endorsements are received, final proposal is submitted to Academic Planning, the University Interdisciplinary Council, CRAC, Academic Senate, Provost, President, Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), and Chancellor’s Office;
  • Major/concentration is assigned an administrative home per the guidelines of the Interdisciplinary Studies Task Force Report;
  • On-going oversight and evaluation responsibilities for the new program are shared by Academic Planning, the University Interdisciplinary Council and the Provost's Office.

 

 

N.Oversight and Approval Process for Minor Programs

New minor programs are subject to review and approval by the department, college, Academic Planning, Curriculum Review and Approval Committee, Academic Senate, Provost, and President.

 

The information required for review and approval of a proposed minor program is less detailed than for a full degree major program. Requests for approval of a minor program should follow the format below.

 

  1. General Procedures for Proposing Minors
  • Proposals ordinarily shall be initiated by Departments, Programs, or Colleges of the University, and following College approval shall be processed through the regular program review process of the University in the same manner as other new and revised curricular programs;
  • Proposals should be submitted in the format prescribed. Copies of the guidelines are available from the Office of the Provost;
  • The sponsoring unit (i.e., program, department, school, college, interdisciplinary area) must designate an appropriate faculty member who will be responsible for coordinating the program. As may be appropriate, this may be the department chair;
  • All officially approved minor programs should be described in the University Bulletin;
  • All information circulated in connection with such programs should have the prior clearance of the appropriate college dean;
  • Upon satisfactory completion of an approved minor program, including making formal application for same, the Director of Admissions and Records, or his/her designee, shall enter an appropriate designation on the student's permanent record and shall maintain annual records of the names (and numbers) of all students completing minors.  The Director of Admissions and Records should report to the Provost each year on the number and type of minors completed;
  • In recognition of the desire to maintain some flexibility in meeting unique program needs, academic units of the University may submit proposals to the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning (for subsequent review by appropriate Academic Senate committees) which are in some way at variance with the stated criteria. When this is done, ample justification for the variance must be submitted as an integral part of the proposal;
  • The Curriculum Review and Approval Committee shall be charged with the review and approval of proposed or revised minor programs. Minor programs shall be subject to review in conjunction with the five-year academic review of the program, department, college, and/or division in which the minor is housed.

 

  1. Procedures for Proposing Interdisciplinary Minors

In addition to following the general procedures listed above, the development of interdisciplinary proposals includes the following steps:

  • A "Prospectus" is prepared on the new minor to include:
  • proposed title of new minor and general subject areas likely to be included in the program
  • statement of need for and/or desirability of new minor in relation to the mission of the institution
  • expected clientele (i.e., type and numbers) for this new program
  • a statement of resources (including library resources) which are likely to be required and a statement of impact on other programs of the University
  • names of sponsors which must include representatives from each disciplinary area likely to be involved in offering the program
  • The Prospectus is submitted to the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning who will be responsible for its dissemination to all College Deans for information purposes and for coordinating its review by the University Interdisciplinary Council and approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
  • Development, Approval, and Implementation of Formal Program Proposal
  • After the minor is approved for inclusion in the Academic Master Plan, the University Interdisciplinary Council in consultation with the original program proposers shall designate a formal Program Committee to include as many of the original program proposers as desire to serve, plus others as appropriate
  • Program Committee prepares curriculum of new minor utilizing the general procedures for proposing minors (see above)
  • Completed program proposal is directed to appropriate College Dean for appropriate consultations and endorsements
  • After College endorsements are received, final proposal is submitted to Academic Planning, the University Interdisciplinary Council, CRAC, Academic Senate, Provost, and President
  • Minor is assigned an administrative home per the guidelines of the Interdisciplinary Studies Task Force Report
  • On-going oversight and evaluation responsibilities for the new program are shared by Academic Planning, the University Interdisciplinary Council and the Provost's Office.

 

The Curriculum Review and Approval Committee shall be charged with the review and approval of proposed and revised minor programs. Minor programs shall be subject to review in conjunction with the five-year academic review of the program, department, college, and/or division in which the minor is housed.

 

department, college, Academic Planning, Curriculum Review and Approval Committee, Academic Senate, Provost, and President.

 

O.Oversight and Approval Process for Certificate Programs

New certificate programs are subject to review and approval by the department, college, Academic Planning, Curriculum Review and Approval Committee, Academic Senate, Provost, President, and Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).

 

The information required for review and approval of a proposed certificate program is less detailed than for a full degree major program. Requests for approval of a certificate program should follow the format below.

 

  1. General Procedures for Proposing Undergraduate Certificates
  • Proposals ordinarily shall be initiated by Departments, Programs, or Colleges of the University, and following College approval shall be processed through the regular program review process of the University in the same manner as other new and revised curricular programs.
  • Proposals should be submitted in the format prescribed. Copies of the guidelines are available from the Office of the Provost.
  • The sponsoring unit (i.e., program, department, school, college, interdisciplinary area) must designate an appropriate faculty member who will be responsible for coordinating the program. As may be appropriate, this may be the department chair.
  • All officially approved certificate programs should be described in the University Bulletin.
  • All information circulated in connection with such programs should have the prior clearance of the appropriate College Dean.
  • Upon satisfactory completion of an approved certificate program, including making formal application for same, the Director of Admissions and Records, or his/her designee, shall enter an appropriate designation on the student's permanent record and shall maintain annual records of the names (and numbers) of all students completing certificates. The Director of Admissions and Records should report to the Provost each year on the number and type of certificates completed.

 

  1. Procedures for Proposing Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Certificates

In addition to following the general procedures listed above, the development of interdisciplinary proposals includes the following steps:

  • A "Prospectus" is prepared on the new certificate to include:
  • proposed title of new certificate and general subject areas likely to be included in the program
  • statement of need for and/or desirability of new certificate in relation to the mission of the institution;
  • expected clientele (i.e., type and numbers) for this new program;
  • a statement of resources (including library resources) which are likely to be required and a statement of impact on other programs of the University;
  • names of sponsors which must include representatives from each disciplinary area likely to be involved in offering the program.
  • The Prospectus is submitted to the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning who will be responsible for its dissemination to all College Deans for information purposes and for coordinating its review by the University Interdisciplinary Council and approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs
  • Development, Approval, and Implementation of Formal Program Proposal
  • After the certificate is approved for inclusion in the Academic Master Plan, the University Interdisciplinary Council in consultation with the original program proposers shall designate a formal Program Committee to include as many of the original program proposers as desire to serve, plus others as appropriate.
  • Program Committee prepares curriculum of new minor utilizing the general procedures for proposing minors (see above).
  • Completed program proposal is directed to appropriate College Dean for appropriate consultations and endorsements.
  • After College endorsements are received, final proposal is submitted to Academic Planning, the University Interdisciplinary Council, CRAC, Academic Senate, Provost, President, and Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).
  • Minor is assigned an administrative home per the guidelines of the Interdisciplinary Studies Task Force Report.

On-going oversight and evaluation responsibilities for the new interdisciplinary certificate program are shared by the University Interdisciplinary Council and the Provost's Office. The primary responsibility for determining a student's completion of a certificate program shall rest in the academic department or program or the Extended Learning program area in which the certificate program is housed. The appropriate program head, upon review of the student’s transcript, shall make an endorsement of the completion of a certificate program. This endorsement, together with a listing of the program requirements to be met and a transcript showing that they have been met, shall be forwarded, as appropriate, to the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning or the Director of Extended Learning for review and formal awarding of the certificate on behalf of the program area offering the program and in the name of the University. All certificates must state the number of units required for completion of the program. Notification of the award of the certificate shall be forwarded, upon completion of the program, by the appropriate dean to the Office of Admissions and Records for recording on the student's transcript and filing in the student's permanent file.

 

The Curriculum Review and Approval Committee shall be charged with the review and approval of proposed and revised certificate programs. Certificate programs shall be subject to review in conjunction with the five-year academic review of the program, department, college, and/or division in which the certificate is housed.

 

Timeline for implementation of this policy

 

P.Undergraduate Students

 

Students who began their studies at San Francisco State University, at another California State University, or at a California community college prior to the approval of this policy and who maintain continuous enrollment can choose to satisfy either the requirements in effect when they began their studies (for university-wide requirements) and when they declared their major, concentration, minor, or certificate (for major, concentration, minor, or certificate requirements), or those in effect when they apply for the degree, major, concentration, minor, or certificate.

 

Q.Current Major, Concentration, Minor, and Certificate Programs

 

Within two years of the approval of this policy, all academic entities that offer major, concentration, minor, and certificate programs must submit a report to the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning demonstrating compliance with this policy, including any exceptions to this policy approved by the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning. Programs will also be required to demonstrate compliance at the time of Program Review.

 

R.Approval of New Programs

 

Once this policy is approved, all proposals to revise current or establish new major programs, concentrations, minor, or certificates must demonstrate compliance with this policy or obtain an exception to this policy from the Dean of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning before the proposal can be approved.

 

Implications for Existing Curriculum and Governance Policies

 

Upon approval and full implementation, elements of existing San Francisco State University policies that conflict with this policy shall be superseded.

 

S77-016     Indication of concentration and minor on transcripts

F79-050     Undergraduate Minor Program

F80-063     Procedures for Submitting Proposals for New Options, Certificate Programs, Concentrations, Special Emphases, & Minors

S81-075     Interdisciplinary Minors

S84-082     Major in the Bachelor of Art Degree & in the Bachelor of Science Degree

F84-125     Requirement in U.S. History & Government

F85-135     Regulations for Meeting Graduation Requirements

S87-088     Certificate Program Guidelines

S91-170     Guiding Principles for Review and Approval of New or Revised Courses

S92-179     Multicultural Perspectives in the Curriculum

S99-207     Basic Information Competence Requirement

F05-064     General Education Program Policy Consolidation

(This document consolidates all previously approved policies, amendments, and revisions of the GE policy dating from 1977 through 2001: S77-15, F80-64, S81-73, S82-91, S85-132, S88-64, F88-157, S89-162, S93-107, S99-64, S01-01 (Segment II Revision), S01-02 (Segment III Revision), F81-081.)

Appendices

Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees, Majors, Concentrations, Minors, and Certificates

 

The appendices which follow provide supplemental information for Academic Senate policy #S19-255 “Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees, Majors, Concentrations, Minors, and Certificates. Only the Academic Senate, with approval of the President, can change Academic Senate policy #S19-255, the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University” or these Appendices, although sub-committees of the Academic Senate may make recommendations for changes to any of the three.

The BRC and/or the Academic Senate has approved the following changes to the course expectations and/or student learning outcomes of the following areas:

History:

 

Version

Approved

Revisions(s)

14

2/19/2019

  • Eliminated Area C3 in order to comply with EO1100.
  • Provided clarification regarding exceptions to prerequisites, specifically that in the case of two-semester “stretch” courses the first semester course is a prerequisite to the second semester course

13

05/01/2018

  • adding a requirement to offer GE courses at least every five years
  • removal of the intermediate algebra prerequisite to Area B4 courses
  • removal of Area E as an overlay
  • elimination of Area A4
  • allowing upper division GE courses to be taken once the golden four (A1, A2, A3 and B4) have been completed
  • removal of the EPT and ELM tests.
  • Add First Year Experience requirement across A2 and Area E.
  • Add written composition requirement in Area E.

Some changes are effective Fall 2018 and others Fall 2019.

12

03/072017

  • Added requirement that BRC present changes to the appendices to the Senate as an information item.
  • Minimum grade requirement in Area A1-3 and B4 is lowered to a C- or better. CR grades are allowed.

11

5/12/2015

  • Name of Overlay requirements changed to SF Studies
  • Minimum grade requirement in Area A1-3 and B4 is raised to a C or better. CR grades are no longer allowed.

10

3/10/2015

  • Topical Perspectives option removed from upper division GE

9

1/17/2014

  • The C2/C3 labels for Humanities and Humanities: Literature were switched to be consistent with community college designations

8

01/17/2014

  • Designations for Area C2 (Humanities and Literature) and Area C3 (Humanities) were exchanged to align with CCC designations.

7

01/22/2013

  • Area A2 and A4 to clarify language in the SLOs and course expectations

6

10/11/2012

  • Upper division American Institutions

5

09/27/2012

  • Area E (Lifelong Learning and Self-development changes

4

09/13/2012

  • Area B4 to clarify language in the SLOs and course expectations and reduce the number of SLOs

3

05/03/2012

  • Area B1, B2, B3 and UD-B to clarify language in the SLOs and course expectations and reduce the number of SLOs.

2

02/23/2012

  • Overlays (AERM, ES, GP and SJ) to provide more consistency between the requirements of the four overlays (subsequently renamed to SF State Studies).

1

10/05/2010

Original

 

 

 

 

The following is a list of the appendices that follow:

Appendix Title

Appendix A: Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University

Appendix B: Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for

Lower Division General Education

Appendix C: Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for First-Year Experience

Appendix D: Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for

American Ethnic and Racial Minorities

Appendix E: Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for

Environmental Sustainability

Appendix F: Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for

Global Perspectives

Appendix G: Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for

Social Justice

Appendix H: Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for

Upper Division General Education

Appendix I: Complementary Studies Requirement Description and Examples

Appendix J: Technology Related to the Major, Sample Outcomes

 

 

Appendix A

 

Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University

Endorsed by the Academic Senate on March 11, 2008

 

San Francisco State University undergraduates will emerge from their studies with a breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding developed from integrating their course work and academic experiences in both general education and in the major. The abilities, knowledge, and qualities of mind fostered by general education will be reinforced, extended, and deepened in the major. Students should pursue a secondary focus in addition to their major (e.g., a second major, minor, certificate). We expect the following interconnected educational outcomes from a baccalaureate of San Francisco State University:

 

  1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor: San Francisco State University's baccalaureate graduates will be competent in critical questioning and analysis, creative and independent thought, attentive reading and interpretation, written and other forms of communication, quantitative reasoning, research drawing upon a variety of resources, problem solving, and collaboration. Students should have knowledge of a language other than English.

 

  1. Intellectual Attainments: Graduates will be conversant with the principal domains of knowledge associated with liberal learning: the sciences and mathematics, the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts. They will be able to apply the modes of inquiry associated with these domains and will have engaged questions and issues of enduring importance. They will also gain in-depth knowledge and understanding of at least one major course of study. These competencies and attainments will provide graduates with intellectual foundations for careers or for advanced study.

 

  1. Appreciation of Diversity: Graduates will know, understand, and appreciate multiple forms and variations of human diversity, both within the United States and globally. Graduates will respect themselves and others. They will have obtained a historical perspective about the development of our diverse nation and will be able to engage in informed, civil discourse with persons different from themselves in intellectual and cultural outlook.

 

  1. Ethical Engagement: Graduates will have an appreciation of the necessity and difficulty of making ethical choices, both private and public, and will be able to identify and analyze the values that inform those choices. Graduates will demonstrate ethical conduct in their own work and their acknowledgement of the work of others. Graduates will recognize their responsibility to work toward social justice and equity by contributing purposefully to the well-being of their local communities, their nations, and the people of the world, as well as to the sustainability of the natural environment.

 

  1. Integration and Application of Knowledge: Graduates will know how to make connections among apparently disparate forms of knowledge and modes of inquiry across academic disciplines and between the principal domains of knowledge and their majors. They also will be able to place such knowledge and approaches within their cultural, historical, and sociopolitical contexts. Graduates will be able to apply academic knowledge to what is important in their own lives and to local and global communities.

 

  1. Qualities of Mind and Spirit: Graduates will take with them dispositions that facilitate lifelong learning and growth, including curiosity, a sense of wonder, intellectual flexibility and adaptability, a refusal to simplify what is inherently complex and ambiguous, a sense of responsibility and accountability, critical self-reflection, independence of mind, respect for wellness and healthy living, a readiness to assume leadership roles, and reverence for all that unites us as human beings across time.

 

 

Appendix B

 

Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for Lower Division General Education

 

This section includes course expectations and student learning outcomes for Areas A through E in lower division general education and Areas B through D in upper division general education from Executive Order 1033 (superseded by EO 1065, 1100, 1100 Revised). Courses that meet the student learning outcomes identified for an area will be approved for that area, regardless of the disciplinary designation of the unit originating the proposal. The section for each requirement ends with a chart showing how the student learning outcomes for that requirement are linked to the educational goals.

 

The First Year Experience faculty director will be charged with providing support for the quality and assessment of Golden Four (I.e. A1, A2, A3, B4) and Area E courses.

 

 

 

Lower Division English Language Communication and Critical Thinking (Area A)

 

Students take three classes (9 units), one each from A1, A2, and A3. To be used for fulfillment of General Education Requirements, Area A1, A2, and A3 courses must be completed with a CR or C- or higher grade.

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Oral Communication (A1) (3 units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division oral communication (A1) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be lower division, open to all students, and may not have prerequisites.

 

  1. At least one of the assignments must be related in some way to one or more of the following topics, drawn from the goals for the baccalaureate at San Francisco State University: (a) human diversity within the United States and/or globally; (b) ethical choices; (c) social justice; (d) the well-being of communities, nations, or the people of the world; (e) the sustainability of the natural environment; (f) applications of academic knowledge to what is important in one’s own life; or (g) what unites us as human beings across time.

 

  1. At least one of the assignments shall involve (a) utilizing a plan for acquiring and recording information employing basic search strategies to explore core sources, including library resources; (b) articulating and applying rudimentary criteria in evaluating information and sources; and (c) using and citing properly the information in assignments.

 

  1. Assignments shall foster the understanding and value of academic integrity, and encourage students to take responsibility as an engaged person in various roles: student, learner, professional, and global citizen.

 

  1. Some assignments or classroom activities should encourage the development of skills and strategies for working collaboratively.

 

  1. At least one of the assignments must be related to one of the following: (a) plans for academic or co-curricular experiences on campus; (b) intellectual or social activities of university life (e.g., performances, exhibitions, lectures, etc.); (c) time and/or stress management; or (d) financial planning including money and credit management during college and/or after graduation.

 

  1. The course syllabus must include references to assignments that are described above as part of the course expectations.

 

  1. The course syllabus must include the university-approved student learning outcomes for oral communication and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Oral Communication (A1) (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in oral communication, students will be able to:

 

  1. effectively organize, construct, and deliver prepared and spontaneous presentations to groups of 20 or more, using the following:
  • a plan for acquiring and recording information using basic search strategies to explore core sources, including library resources;
  • careful assessment of claims, supporting materials, and arguments;
  • organizational principles leading to a coherent presentation focused on a main point and a reasonable number of supporting points given time constraints;
  • information and strategies that will facilitate listeners’ understanding;
  • effective delivery techniques for oral communication;

 

  1. articulate principles for making effective technologically-enhanced presentations;

 

  1. effectively listen to prepared and spontaneous discourse by using the following:
  • active listening skills;
  • careful assessment of claims, supporting materials, and arguments;

 

  1. demonstrate skills for working collaboratively, including articulating a perspective, rationale, and exchange of ideas in forming a group goal;

 

  1. demonstrate perspective-taking skills, both as a speaker and a listener;

 

  1. engage in informed civil discourse with persons different from themselves in intellectual and cultural outlook;

 

  1. demonstrate ethical conduct in their communication including such practices as
    • accurate presentation of information;
    • appropriate citation of the ideas and words of others;
    • respectful treatment of others even when disagreeing;
    • acknowledgment of the importance of the privacy and confidentiality of others; and
    • acceptance of responsibility for the consequences of one’s discourse;

 

  1. reduce their own speech anxiety and project greater confidence as a speaker; and

 

  1. apply communication principles in their personal lives and their communities.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Oral Communication

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division oral communication. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Oral Communication

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

1, 2, 3, 4, 5

3. Appreciation of Diversity

6

4. Ethical Engagement

7

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

8, 9

 

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Written English Communication (A2) (3 units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee and the Committee on Written English Proficiency as meeting the lower-division written English communication (A2) general education requirement and the University Written English Communication Policy,

 

1.   The course must yield a minimum of 6,000 words of formal academic writing, including revisions.

 

2.   The course must be lower division, open to all students, and may not have prerequisites (except for the two-semester “stretch” courses where the first semester course is a prerequisite to the second semester course); Students should use their course decision from the Write to Register (formerly DSP) or Write to Register for Multilingual Students to enroll in the appropriate version of the course.

 

3.   The course must be graded on an A, B, C, NC basis, plus/minus grading allowed.

Only grades of a C- or better will fulfill the Area A2 requirement.

 

4.   The course is taught by faculty with expertise in writing pedagogy, a demonstrated commitment to student-centered, collaborative and culturally-responsive teaching, and experience working with first-year students. 

 

5.   The course syllabus must include the university-approved student learning outcomes for A2 and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

6.   The course must focus on:

 

Writing for Inquiry, Belonging, and Self-Development: First-Year Experience

  • Opportunities to discuss students’ growth, identity, and self-development
  • Activities and assignments that involve attending campus events, investigating campus resources, and/or engaging with campus organizations
  • Assignments that promote intellectual inquiry and discovery
  • Assignments that help students produce written arguments as the result of inquiry and discovery
  • Assignments that culminate in a digital or print portfolio of college-level writing

 

  1. The course will cover:

 

Rhetorical Knowledge

  • Instruction and practice in academic genres of reading and writing
  • Instruction and practice in developing an understanding of audience, genre, and purpose
  • Opportunities for students to discover their own rhetorical purpose

 

Writing Process

  • Opportunities for discovering and practicing the writing process, including significant opportunities for feedback and revision
  • Opportunities for collaboration, and an emphasis on how collaboration can lead to new discoveries
  • Opportunities for students to discover that writing can lead to new ideas and understanding

 

Information Literacy

  • Assignments that involve incorporating reading into students’ writing
  • Opportunities to learn about and explore library resources
  • Instruction and practice in locating, summarizing, analyzing, evaluating, and ethically using sources

 

Reflection and Metacognition

  • Support for students in identifying strategies for college success
  • Support for students as they make the transition to college
  • Readings, activities, and assignments that encourage reflection on the self, identity (e.g. social, familial and cultural), purpose, and goals as student and learner
  • Readings, activities, and assignments that encourage reflection on how personal experiences and goals relate to social justice, equity, and inclusion

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Written English Communication A2 (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in Written English Communication, students will be able to:

 

  1. Writing for Inquiry, Belonging, and Self-Development: use writing as a form of inquiry, in order to build inquiry-driven academic arguments, culminating in a print or digital portfolio of writing.  Assignments should allow students to explore/discover their experiences, goals, interests, and purpose at SFSU.

 

  1. Rhetorical Knowledge: demonstrate a familiarity with rhetorical conventions, including purpose, audience, and genre;

 

  1. Information Literacy: read actively and use information acquired from readings critically in their own writing; integrate reading effectively into their writing; locate, evaluate, and use information ethically in their writing.

 

  1. Writing Processes: Use writing processes and strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading their own and others’ work; collaborate with faculty and peers during the writing process and on writing projects; use writing processes and strategies for discovering ideas;

 

  1. Reflection and Metacognition: Reflect on and develop student success and writing strategies; identify and practice habits of mind such as curiosity, openness, engagement, persistence, flexibility, and responsibility.

           

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Written Communication

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division written communication. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Written Communication

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

1, 2, 3, 4, 5

4. Ethical Engagement

3

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Critical Thinking (A3) (3 units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division critical thinking (A3) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be lower division, open to all students, and may not have prerequisites.

 

  1. At least one of the assignments must be related in some way to one or more of the following topics, drawn from the goals for the baccalaureate at San Francisco State University: (a) human diversity within the United States and/or globally; (b) ethical choices; (c) social justice; (d) the well-being of communities, nations, or the people of the world; (e) the sustainability of the natural environment; (f) applications of academic knowledge to what is important in one’s own life; or (g) what unites us as human beings across time.

 

  1. At least one of the assignments shall involve (a) utilizing a plan for acquiring and recording information employing basic search strategies to explore core sources, including library resources; (b) articulating and applying rudimentary criteria in evaluating information and sources; and (c) using and citing properly the information in assignments.

 

  1. Assignments shall foster the understanding and value of academic integrity, and encourage students to take responsibility as an engaged person in various roles: student, learner, professional, and global citizen.

 

  1. Some assignments or classroom activities should encourage the development of skills and strategies for working collaboratively.

 

  1. The course syllabus must include references to assignments that are described above as part of the course expectations.

 

  1. The course syllabus must include the university-approved student learning outcomes for critical thinking and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Critical Thinking (A3) (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in critical thinking, students will be able to:

 

  1. understand and articulate basic principles of formal reasoning and their relation to language, and be able to communicate in language that meets the standards of logic;

 

  1. analyze, criticize and advocate ideas;

 

  1. identify common formal and informal fallacies of reasoning, both to avoid these in their own thinking and to criticize these in thinking presented to them;

 

  1. construct elementary valid deductive arguments, including being able to identify and assess overtly expressed premises, suppressed premises, and conclusions;

 

  1. construct elementary sound inductive arguments, including being able to identify and assess hypotheses and evidence;

 

  1. distinguish matters of fact from issues of judgment or opinion, and construct arguments that reach valid or well-supported factual and judgmental conclusions; and

 

  1. demonstrate ethical conduct in reasoning, meeting at least the following standards for respectful participation in the community of learners: accurately stating and not misrepresenting the strength of logical connections, not misleading others regarding the truth status of empirical claims, providing full citation or attribution of other people's views, adhering to the "principle of generosity" in reporting or interpreting other people's views.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Critical Thinking

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division critical thinking. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Critical Thinking

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

4. Ethical Engagement

7

 

 

 

Lower Division Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning (Area B)

 

Students take a minimum of 9 units, including at least one course from B1, B2, B3 and B4. Typically, B3 (a lab course) will be associated with a lecture course in B1 or B2. If not, the course that satisfies Area B3 should be taken concurrently with or following the appropriate lecture course. To be used for fulfillment of General Education Requirements, Area B4 courses must be completed with a CR or C- or higher grade.

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Physical Science (B1) (3units) [preferably including a lab (see B3) within 3 units]

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division physical science (B1) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be lower division and open to all students. Courses that are numbered between 100 and 199 may not have prerequisites other than passage of an assessment test to determine readiness in the subject (which might include departmental tests). Prerequisite assessments and scores must be available within the first week of the semester. In addition, sample tests or online tutorials must be available to allow students to self-assess their readiness for the course. Courses that are numbered between 200 and 299 may have a single prerequisite, but departments and programs must provide an adequate justification for that prerequisite. Typically, students should be eligible to enroll in lower division general education courses in their first year;

 

  1. The syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for physical science (B1) and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes;

 

  1. Students will be taught the steps in the scientific method of inquiry, which involves gathering observable, empirical and measurable evidence subject to specific principles of reasoning. The course will emphasize that the degree of acceptance of a theory by the scientific community grows as the number of reproducible observations of its predictions increases;

 

  1. The utility of alternative scientific hypotheses in the development of scientific theories will be discussed. Examples will be given of how scientific evidence is used to develop hypotheses and theories; and

 

  1. Course content will focus on inquiry into the physical universe.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Physical Science (B1) (3 units)

 

  1. After completion of a lower division general education course in physical science, students will be able to: gather and interpret scientific information from a variety of sources and use that information to discuss scientific issues;

 

  1. describe ethical or sociological dilemmas arising out of scientific research and applications, which may include those related to social justice, and may have implications for local and/or global communities;

 

  1. use scientific theories and methods of inquiry to explain phenomena observed in laboratory or field settings; and

 

  1. discuss the relevance of major scientific theories and/or research to modern day life. Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Physical Science The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division physical science. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Physical Science

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

3

2. Intellectual Attainments

1, 2, 4

4. Ethical Engagement

5

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

6, 7

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Life Science (B2) (3 units) [preferably including a

lab (see B3) within 3 units]

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division life science (B2) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be lower division and open to all students. Courses that are numbered between 100 and 199 may not have prerequisites other than passage of an assessment test to determine readiness in the subject, (which might include departmental tests). Prerequisite assessments and scores must be available within 7 calendars days from the start of the semester. In addition, sample tests or online tutorials must be available to allow students to self-assess their readiness for the course. Courses that are numbered between 200 and 299 may have a single prerequisite, but departments and programs must provide an adequate justification for that prerequisite. Typically, students should be eligible to enroll in lower division general education courses in their first year;

 

  1. The syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for life science (B2) and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes;

 

  1. Students will be taught the steps in the scientific method of inquiry, which involves gathering observable, empirical and measurable evidence subject to specific principles of reasoning. The course will emphasize that the degree of acceptance of a theory by the scientific community grows as the number of reproducible observations of its predictions increases;

 

  1. The utility of alternative scientific hypotheses in the development of scientific theories will be discussed. Examples will be given of how scientific evidence is used to develop hypotheses and theories; and

 

  1. Course content will focus on inquiry into living systems.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Life Science (B2) (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in life science, students will be able to:

 

  1. gather and interpret scientific information from a variety of sources and use that information to discuss scientific issues;

 

  1. describe ethical or sociological dilemmas arising out of scientific research and applications, which may include those related to social justice, and may have implications for local and/or global communities;

 

  1. use scientific theories and methods of inquiry to explain phenomena observed in laboratory or field settings; and

 

  1. discuss the relevance of major scientific theories and/or research to modern day life.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Life Science

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division life science. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Life Science

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

3

2. Intellectual Attainments

1, 2, 4

4. Ethical Engagement

5

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

6, 7

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Laboratory Activity (B3) (1 unit; may be an overlay)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division laboratory activity (B3) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be lower division and open to all students. Courses that are numbered between 100 and 199 may not have prerequisites other than passage of an assessment test to determine readiness in the subject, (which might include departmental tests). Prerequisite assessments and scores must be available within the first week of the semester. In addition, sample tests or online tutorials must be available to allow students to self-assess their readiness for the course. Courses that are numbered between 200 and 299 may have a single prerequisite, but departments and programs must provide an adequate justification for that prerequisite. Typically, students should be eligible to enroll in lower division general education courses in their first year;

 

  1. Courses satisfying the requirements for Area B3 will typically be associated with a lecture course in Area B1 or B2. They will ideally be embedded in the lecture course so that no additional units are added, but they may be a separate course with additional units. In the case of a separate laboratory course that is a companion to a lecture course in Area B1 or B2, the co- or pre-requisite may be the corresponding lecture course;

 

  1. The syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for laboratory activity (B3) and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes; and

 

  1. The course will include discussion of how the laboratory work relates to current research in science, the consequences that seemingly minor oversights in accurate recording of data can have, and how scientific principles learned in the lab can apply to situations outside of the laboratory.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Laboratory Activity (B3) (1 unit; may be an overlay)

After completion of a lower division laboratory activity related to a course in Area B1 or B2, students will be able to:

 

  1. apply appropriate methods of analysis to raw data;

 

  1. carry out common laboratory procedures correctly and adhere to instructions on laboratory safety; recognize hazardous situations and act appropriately;

 

  1. maintain a timely, comprehensive laboratory notebook, including any outside or background research, with sufficient detail to permit repeatability of experiments;

 

  1. explain the scientific method, including concepts of hypothesis and experimental controls, and why objectivity is essential; and

 

  1. apply critical thinking in the laboratory and recognize whether results and conclusions make sense.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Lab Science

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division lab science. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Lab Science

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

3

2. Intellectual Attainments

1, 2, 4

4. Ethical Engagement

5

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

6, 7

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning (B4) (3units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division mathematics (Area B4)

 

  1. The course must be lower division and open to all students. Courses that are numbered between 100 and 199 may not have prerequisites (except the two-semester “stretch” courses where the first semester course is a prerequisite to the second semester course) other than passage of an assessment test (which might include departmental tests) to determine placement in the subject. Courses that are numbered between 200 and 299 may have a single prerequisite together with a departmental test to gauge the student’s immediate readiness, but departments and programs must provide an adequate justification for that prerequisite. Typically, students should be eligible to enroll in lower division general education courses in their first year. Prerequisite assessments and scores must be available within 7 calendars days from the start of the semester.
  2. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning (B4) and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.
  3. The course must stress the importance of presenting information accurately, applying mathematical models or methods appropriately, respecting the rights and welfare of others when collecting or disseminating quantitative information, and/or presenting information in a manner suitable for those receiving that information.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning (B4) (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in mathematics/quantitative reasoning, students will be able to:

 

  1. interpret mathematical models such as formulae, graphs, tables, and schematics, and draw inferences from them; represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically, and verbally;

 

  1. interpret and draw conclusions from quantitative materials and use those materials to construct mathematical models;

 

  1. use arithmetical, algebraic, geometric and and/or statistical methods to solve problems; explain and apply mathematical concepts; use computational skills and appropriate technology to carry out mathematical operations;

 

  1. estimate and check answers to mathematical problems in order to determine reasonableness, identify alternatives, and select optimal results;

 

  1. identify ways in which use of quantitative methods impacts our society or environment.

 

 

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division mathematics/quantitative reasoning. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

1, 2, 3, 4

2. Intellectual Attainments

1, 2, 3

3. Ethical Engagement

5

4. Integration and Application of Knowledge

4

 

 

 

 

 

Lower Division Arts and Humanities (Area C)

 

Students take a minimum of 9 units, including one course from Area C1, one course from Area C2, one chosen from Area C1 or C2.

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Arts (C1) (3 units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division arts (C1) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be lower division and open to all students. Courses that are numbered between 100 and 199 may not have prerequisites. Courses that are numbered between 200 and 299 may have a single prerequisite, but departments and programs must provide an adequate justification for that prerequisite. Typically, students should be eligible to enroll in lower division general education courses in their first year.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for arts (C1) and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Arts (C1) (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in arts, students will be able to:

 

  1. appreciate and reflect on specific ways of knowing the world involved in the creation, interpretation, and evaluation of artistic works and performances;

 

  1. evaluate information from a variety of sources and use that information to articulate well-reasoned responses to artistic concerns;

 

  1. appreciate diverse artistic expressions;

 

  1. describe ethical issues arising out of artistic expressions, which may include those related to social justice, and may have implications for local and/or global communities;

 

  1. identify local and/or global cultural, historical, and sociopolitical contexts for artistic expressions; and

 

  1. articulate the relevance of artistic expressions to their lives.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Arts

 

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division arts. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Arts

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

2

2. Intellectual Attainments

1

3. Appreciation of Diversity

3

4. Ethical Engagement

4

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

5, 6

 

 

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Humanities (C2) (3 units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division humanities (C2) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be lower division and open to all students. Courses that are numbered between 100 and 199 may not have prerequisites. Courses that are numbered between 200 and 299 may have a single prerequisite, but departments and programs must provide an adequate justification for that prerequisite. Typically, students should be eligible to enroll in lower division general education courses in their first year.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for humanities (Area C2 for Humanities) and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Humanities (C2) (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in humanities, students will be able to:

 

  1. Understand or apply humanistic methods of inquiry, analysis, and interpretation to contest knowledge claims about expressive forms, cultural traditions, belief systems, or communicative practices while encouraging reflection on big ideas such as the nature of the good life, how and why cultural traditions change, and the power of imagination to enlarge and invigorate experience;

 

  1. evaluate information from a variety of sources and use this information to formulate well-reasoned responses to major ideas, concerns, and/or debates that animate humanistic study or literary works;

 

  1. appreciate various expressive or literary forms/styles, cultural traditions, belief systems, diverse human experiences/perspectives, or communicative practices;

 

  1. identify ethical issues or themes that arise in expressive forms, literary works, cultural traditions, belief systems, or communicative practices, particularly in relation to demands for social justice and in terms of their implications for local and/or global communities;

 

  1. situate expressive forms, literary works, cultural traditions, belief systems, or communicative practices in the local and/or global cultural, historical, and sociopolitical contexts in which they were produced; and

 

  1. articulate the relevance of expressive forms, literature and literary studies, cultural traditions, belief systems, or communicative practices to their own lives.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Humanities

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division humanities. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Humanities

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

2

2. Intellectual Attainments

1

3. Appreciation of Diversity

3

4. Ethical Engagement

4

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

5, 6

Lower Division Social Sciences (Area D)

 

Students take a minimum of 9 units, including one course from Area D1, Area D2, and Area D3.

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Social Sciences (D1) (3 units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division social sciences (D1) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be lower division and open to all students. Courses that are numbered between 100 and 199 may not have prerequisites. Courses that are numbered between 200 and 299 may have a single prerequisite, but departments and programs must provide an adequate justification for that prerequisite. Typically, students should be eligible to enroll in lower division general education courses in their first year.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for social sciences (D1) and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Social Sciences (D1) (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in social sciences, students will be able to:

 

  1. understand how the methods of inquiry and analysis characteristic of one or more of the behavioral and social sciences are used to produce and contest knowledge claims about large-scale issues and questions related to human behavior, socially constructed identities, institutions, economic, political, or social systems, or human societies within and/or across cultures and civilizations;

 

  1. evaluate information from a variety of sources and use this information to formulate well-reasoned responses to major ideas, concerns, and debates in the social sciences;

 

  1. appreciate diversity in human behavior, socially constructed identities, institutions, economic, political, or social systems, and human societies within and/or across cultures and civilizations;

 

  1. identify potential ethical issues related to social scientific research and application, including effects of those issues on research practices and evaluation, individuals, society, and the environment, and where appropriate, implications for social justice and the well-being of local and/or global communities;

 

  1. situate human behavior and social systems in the local and/or global, cultural, historical, and sociopolitical contexts in which they occur; and

 

  1. articulate the relevance of social science theories and research to their lives.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Social Sciences

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division social sciences. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Social Sciences

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

2

2. Intellectual Attainments

1

3. Appreciation of Diversity

3

4. Ethical Engagement

4

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

5, 6

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Social Sciences: US History (D2) (3 units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division social sciences: US History (D2) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be lower division and open to all students. Courses that are numbered between 100 and 199 may not have prerequisites. Courses that are numbered between 200 and 299 may have a single prerequisite, but departments and programs must provide an adequate justification for that prerequisite. Typically, students should be eligible to enroll in lower division general education courses in their first year.

 

  1. As mandated by CSU Executive Order 405, the US History component of the American Institutions requirement may be met either by examination (AP, CLEP, or SF State competency exam) or by taking a course meeting the following content requirements and their corresponding student learning outcomes. All courses approved for the US History requirement must cover:
    • significant events occurring in the entire area now included in the United States of America during a period of “a minimum time space of approximately 100 years,” including the relationships among regions within that area and with external regions and states;
    • the role of major ethnic and social groups in such events and the contexts in which the events have occurred, with attention to the multiple heritages of US culture, including Native American peoples and cultures;
    • the events presented within a framework which illustrates the continuity of American experience and its derivation from other cultures including consideration of three or more of the following: politics, economics, social movements, and geography; and
    • basic American values and ideals, including freedom; equality of opportunity, equality before the law, equality of moral regard for each other; and social fairness.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for US history (D2) and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Social Sciences: US History (D2) (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in US History, students will be able to:

 

  1. understand the interaction and evolution of economic, political, social and cultural processes in the development of the United States;

 

  1. evaluate information from a variety of sources and use this information to formulate well-reasoned responses to major ideas, concerns, and debates in the study of US history;

 

  1. describe the role of major ethnic and social groups in such events and the contexts in which the events have occurred, with attention to the multiple heritages of US culture;

 

  1. identify and appreciate ethical issues related to US history and its study and interpretation, including the treatment of the diversity of American peoples and cultures;

 

  1. situate significant historical events, across “a minimum time space of approximately 100 years,” in their cultural and sociopolitical contexts within and beyond the US; and

 

  1. articulate the relevance of events in US history to their own lives.

 

 

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Social Sciences: US History

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division social sciences: US history. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Social Sciences: US History

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

2

2. Intellectual Attainments

1

3. Appreciation of Diversity

3

4. Ethical Engagement

4

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

5, 6

 

Course Expectations for Lower Division Social Sciences: US and California Government (D3) (3 units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the lower-division social sciences: US and California Government (D3) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be lower division and open to all students. Courses that are numbered between 100 and 199 may not have prerequisites. Courses that are numbered between 200 and 299 may have a single prerequisite, but departments and programs must provide an adequate justification for that prerequisite. Typically, students should be eligible to enroll in lower division general education courses in their first year.

 

  1. As mandated by CSU Executive Order 405, the US and California Government component of the American Institutions requirement may be met either by examination (AP, CLEP, or San Francisco State University competency exam) or by taking a course meeting the following content requirements and their corresponding student learning outcomes. All courses approved for the US and California Government requirement must cover:
    • the political philosophies of the framers of the Constitution and the nature and operation of United States political institutions and processes under that Constitution as amended and interpreted;
    • basic concepts in political theory such as power and influence; political structure and process; government, its legitimacy and authority; and their application to understanding the US system, particularly the roles of law and the Constitution and the relationship between the two;
    • the rights and obligations of citizens established under the Constitution, in the context of basic American values and ideals, including freedom and self-reliance; equality; social fairness; democracy, including issues of participation and minority rights;
    • the constitution of the State of California within the framework of evolution of Federal-State relations and the nature and processes of State and local government under that Constitution; and
    • contemporary relationships of State and local government, the resolution of conflicts and the establishment of cooperative processes under the constitutions of both the State and Nation, and the political processes involved.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for US and CA Government (D3) and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Social Sciences: US and CA Government (D3) (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in US and CA Government, students will be able to:

 

  1. understand US and California political institutions and practices, including governmental structures and federal and state constitutions, and their history and development;

 

  1. evaluate information from a variety of sources and use this information to formulate well- reasoned responses to major issues of governance as they affect the US and California;

 

  1. appreciate the contributions of diverse peoples and cultures to our political processes and a constitutional system which protects minority rights; be able to engage in informed, civil discourse with persons different from themselves in intellectual and cultural outlook;

 

  1. identify the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, including the importance of participation in the political process, and other ethical issues that arise in relation to US and California political institutions and practices;

 

  1. situate US and California political institutions and practices in the local and/or global cultural, historical, and sociopolitical contexts in which they occur within and beyond the US; and

 

  1. articulate the relevance of US and California political institutions and practices to their own lives.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lower Division Social Sciences: US and CA Government

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lower division social sciences: US and CA government. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Social Sciences

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

2

2. Intellectual Attainments

1

3. Appreciation of Diversity

3

4. Ethical Engagement

4

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

5, 6

 

 

 

Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (LLD) (Area E) (3 units)

 

Course Expectations for Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (3 units)

 

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee and the Committee on Written English Proficiency as meeting the lifelong learning and self-development (Area E) general education requirement, the course will meet the following course expectations:

 

  1. The course must be lower division and open to all students who have completed Written English Communication or its equivalent with a CR or C- or higher.

 

2.   The course must yield a minimum of 6,000 words, including revisions.

 

3.   The course should be student-centered, collaborative, culturally-responsive, and focused on the goals of the first-year experience outcomes. Assignments will be centered on the development of students’ voices in a variety of genres and contexts.

 

  1. The course syllabus must include the university-approved student learning outcomes for Area E

and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

  1. The course must focus on:

Persuasion, Participation, Lifelong Learning, and Self-Development: First-Year Experience

  • Opportunities to discuss social justice, equity, and inclusion valued at SF State as it relates to their own histories, experiences, and goals.
  • Opportunities for participation in scholarly and professional conversations on topics that relate to students’ interests and goals
  • Opportunities to discover and apply concepts related to lifelong learning and self-development, including identity, social justice, and well-being
  • Opportunities to create professional arguments in appropriate genres on topics that are meaningful to students
  • Opportunities to explore pathways (e.g. career selection, leadership development, research opportunities, co-curricular activities, etc)
  • Assignments that culminate in a digital or print portfolio.

 

  1. The course will cover:

Rhetorical Knowledge

  • Opportunities to address rhetorical situations and use writing as a form of action/involvement
  • Instruction and practice in analyzing the audience, purpose and genres of writing
  • Instruction and practice in using writing to participate in professional / scholarly conversations regarding authentic social issues chosen by students, including Area E topics and issues drawn from biology, sociology, and physiology, and covering human behavior and culture, health and wellness, social sciences, death and dying, social justice, the environment, science and technology

 

Writing Process

  • Opportunities for practicing the writing process, including significant opportunities for feedback and revision
  • Practice in using collaboration, feedback, and revision to discover more effective ways to persuade one’s audience
  • Opportunities to learn that writing is a goal-driven practice but that goals can evolve through collaboration and through the writing process

Information Literacy

  • Opportunities for employing research strategies and critically evaluating digital and print sources;
  • Opportunities to learn and practice the ethical and rhetorical purposes of citation;
  • Instruction and practice in integrating the ideas of others meaningfully in one’s own writing; using others’ ideas to challenge and deepen one’s own understanding

Reflection and Metacognition

  • Opportunities to reflect on themselves as integrated physiological, social, psychological, and aesthetic beings
  • Opportunities to explore how their values, interests and identities create pathways toward their academic, social, and professional future

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (3 units)

After completion of a lower division general education course in Lifelong Learning and Development, students will be able to:

 

  1. Persuasion, Participation, Lifelong Learning and Self-Development: Employ concepts related to lifelong learning and self-development, including identity development, social justice, and well-being; Use writing and where appropriate, other forms of disciplinary communication, in ways that are responsive to personal and professional goals, culminating in a digital or print portfolio.
  2. Rhetorical Knowledge: compose rhetorically-aware, purposeful prose in a variety of genres and platforms (print, digital, visual, multimedia) matched to purpose, audience, and context;
  3. Information Literacy: learn and use search strategy skills to locate a wide variety of relevant print and digital sources; critically evaluate sources; use and cite information ethically;
  4. Writing Process: adopt task-specific strategies for generating ideas, drafting, editing and proofreading, and revise mindfully, learn and practice giving and receiving feedback from peers and faculty; reflect on their own and others’ literacy practices;
  5. Metacognition and Self Reflection: Reflect on their own first-year experiences inside and outside the university, in order to foster lifelong learning and development, including all of the following:
    1. Employ techniques and strategies that promote the development of well-being and identity;
    2. Reflect on campus experiences and relationships with peers, staff and faculty;
    3. Identify strategies for their academic success.

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Lifelong Learning and Self-Development

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for lifelong learning and self-development. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Lifelong Learning and Self-Development

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

1, 2, 3, 5

2. Intellectual Attainments

1, 5

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

4, 5

 

 

Appendix C

 

Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) (3 units)

 

SF State Studies courses are expected to engage students with the core values of San Francisco State University. Courses approved to satisfy SF State Studies requirements are expected to meet the spirit of these requirements. The theme of the designation should be infused into the course but is not required to be the primary theme or topic of the course. Although some assignments must address the theme, it is not required that all assignments do so.

 

Students earning baccalaureate degrees from San Francisco State University must complete a three-unit course that is designated as an American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) course. Any course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated an AERM course may meet this requirement. Students may use the same course to fulfill more than one requirement, if the course is designated as meeting more than one requirement, but the units will be counted only once.

 

Recognizing that "race" is a historically and socially constructed category, American ethnic and racial minority populations are defined as those that are:

  • excluded from the dominant majority community or culture;
  • excluded from sustained influence on, access to, and participation in structures and institutions in the United States and the privilege of power deriving from such exclusions;
  • identify with or see themselves as members of a distinct ethnic or racial minority group; and
  • racialized as members of that (or another racialized) group and as such, have been systematically oppressed by the dominant society's institutions and ideologies.

 

Course Expectations for American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (3 units; may be an

overlay)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) university requirement,

 

  1. The course may be a lower or upper division course, with or without prerequisites, a transfer course or a course taken in residence, and it may be anywhere in the curriculum (e.g., GE, major, minor, certificate, electives, etc.). Each student earning a baccalaureate degree from San Francisco State University is required to complete at least one American Ethnic and Racial Minorities class.

 

  1. Course syllabi must include the university approved student learning outcomes for American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

  1. Assignments that correspond to the assignment expectations stated below.

 

  1. Courses approved for the American Ethnic and Racial Minorities Requirement should:
  • present views of one or more groups of American Ethnic and Racial Minorities both from the perspective of the group and as an integral part of American society;
  • encourage the study of values, attitudes, behaviors and/or creative endeavors that acknowledge and respect the dignity of all groups; and
  • present a thorough analysis of the historical experiences, social stratification processes, political activism, basic cultural patterns, aesthetic experiences and/or ideologies, and include one or more of the oppressed groups of color: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, Pacific Islander Americans, US Latinas/Latinos, South West Asian/North African Americans, and people of mixed racialized heritages. Student Learning

 

 

 

Outcomes for American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (3 units; may be an overlay)

After successfully completing a course designated as fulfilling the American Ethnic and Racial Minorities requirement, students will be capable of applying scholarship in the study of American Ethnic and Racial Minorities and will be able to do at least two of the following:

 

  1. identify the historical, political, and/or cultural and aesthetic experiences and actions of one or more US ethnic/racial minority groups;

 

  1. identify the value systems and/or styles of creative expression of one or more

 

  1. ethnic/racial minority groups of the United States;

 

  1. develop social and cultural participation skills, decision-making abilities, and political awareness in order to be citizens in an ethnically and racially diverse nation; and

 

  1. develop the understandings and behavioral competencies necessary for effective interpersonal and inter-ethnic group interactions such as the following:
  • recognizing the dynamics of racial hierarchies and power relations,
  • recognizing the dynamics of interpersonal interactions,
  • recognizing the problems of ethnic and racial minority stereotypes, and
  • recognizing the diversity of attitudes and values which are projected in verbal and nonverbal behavior.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for American Ethnic and Racial Minorities

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for American Ethnic and Racial Minorities. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for American Ethnic and Racial Minorities

3. Appreciation of Diversity

1, 2, 3 and/or 4

 

 

 

Appendix D

 

Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for Environmental Sustainability (3 units)

 

SF State Studies courses are expected to engage students with the core values of San Francisco State University. Courses approved to satisfy SF State Studies requirements are expected to meet the spirit of these requirements. The theme of the designation should be infused into the course but is not required to be the primary theme or topic of the course. Although some assignments must address the theme, it is not required that all assignments do so.

 

Students earning baccalaureate degrees from San Francisco State University must complete a three-unit course that is designated as an Environmental Sustainability (ES) course. Any course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated an ES course may meet this requirement. Students may use the same course to fulfill more than one requirement, if the course is designated as meeting more than one requirement, but the units will be counted only once.

 

Course Expectations for Environmental Sustainability (3 units; may be an overlay)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the Environmental Sustainability (ES) university requirement,

 

  1. The course may be a lower or upper division course, with or without prerequisites, a transfer course or a course taken in residence, and it may be anywhere in the curriculum (e.g., GE, major, minor, certificate, electives, etc.). Each student earning a baccalaureate degree from San Francisco State University is required to complete at least one Environmental Sustainability class.

 

  1. The course must examine some aspect of environmental sustainability. The perspective can be from social sciences, natural sciences, arts, humanities, business, engineering, etc.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for environmental sustainability and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Environmental Sustainability (3 units; may be an overlay)

After completion of a course designated as fulfilling the environmental sustainability requirement, students will be able to do at least two of the following:

 

  1. demonstrate how their personal activities impact the environment, and as a result affect the health and well-being of themselves and society.

 

  1. analyze how the well-being of human society is dependent on ecosystems and the materials and services they provide to humanity.

 

  1. explain the interconnectivity of economic prosperity, social equity and environmental quality.

 

  1. identify the most serious environmental problems globally and locally and explain their underlying causes and possible consequences.

 

  1. students will be able to create models, products, designs or creative representations that highlight an understanding of the connections between people, processes and the environment.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Environmental Sustainability

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for Environmental Sustainability. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Environmental Sustainability

4. Ethical Engagement

1, 2, 3, 4

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

3, 5

 

 

 

Appendix E

 

Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for Global Perspectives (GP) (3 units)

 

SF State Studies courses are expected to engage students with the core values of San Francisco State University. Courses approved to satisfy SF State Studies requirements are expected to meet the spirit of these requirements. The theme of the designation should be infused into the course but is not required to be the primary theme or topic of the course. Although some assignments must address the theme, it is not required that all assignments do so.

 

Students earning baccalaureate degrees from San Francisco State University must complete a three-unit course that is designated as a Global Perspectives (GP) course. Any course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated a GP course may meet this requirement. Students may use the same course to fulfill more than one requirement, if the course is designated as meeting more than one requirement, but the units will be counted only once.

 

Course Expectations for Global Perspectives (3 units; may be an overlay)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the Global Perspectives (GP) university requirement,

 

  1. The course may be a lower or upper division course, with or without prerequisites, a transfer course or a course taken in residence, and it may be anywhere in the curriculum (e.g., GE, major, minor, certificate, electives, etc.). Each student earning a baccalaureate degree from San Francisco State University is required to complete at least one global perspectives class.

 

  1. The course must examine topics that are global in scope (i.e., that involve different parts of the world), and must compare and contrast human experiences and perspectives, whether in the present or the past.

 

  1. Any course taken in an approved CSU study-abroad program will automatically fulfill this requirement.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for global perspectives and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Global Perspectives (3 units; may be an overlay)

After completion of a course designated as fulfilling the Global Perspective requirement, students will be able to at least two of the following:

 

  1. recognize that one's view of the world is not universally shared and that others may have profoundly different perceptions;

 

  1. analyze similarities and differences among human experiences and perspectives in different parts of the world and draw conclusions about the significance and consequences of these similarities and differences;

 

  1. understand how the world's systems are interdependent and how local economic and social patterns have global impact beyond their effects on individual lives; and

 

  1. describe factors that contribute to or threaten the well-being of individuals and/or communities in several areas of the world, or factors that did so in the past.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Global Perspectives

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for global perspectives. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Global Perspectives

3. Appreciation of Diversity

1, 2

4. Ethical Engagement

4

5. Integration and Application

3, 4

 

 

 

Appendix F

 

Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for Social Justice (SJ)
(3 units)

 

SF State Studies courses are expected to engage students with the core values of San Francisco State University. Courses approved to satisfy SF State Studies requirements are expected to meet the spirit of these requirements. The theme of the designation should be infused into the course but is not required to be the primary theme or topic of the course. Although some assignments must address the theme, it is not required that all assignments do so.

 

Students earning baccalaureate degrees from San Francisco State University must complete a three-unit course that is designated as a Social Justice (SJ) course. Any course (one in general education, a major, a minor, a certificate, complementary studies, or an elective) that is designated an SJ course may meet this requirement. Students may use the same course to fulfill more than one requirement, if the course is designated as meeting more than one requirement, but the units will be counted only once.

 

Course Expectations for Social Justice (3 units; may be an overlay)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the Social Justice (SJ) university requirement,

 

  1. The course may be a lower or upper division course, with or without prerequisites, a transfer course or a course taken in residence, and it may be anywhere in the curriculum (e.g., GE, major, minor, certificate, electives, etc.). Each student earning a baccalaureate degree from San Francisco State University is required to complete at least one social justice class.

 

  1. The course must address social constructions of identity, hierarchy, power, and privilege; community resistance and empowerment; and social justice. The social constructions may be related to variations among humans, including such factors as abilities, ages, cultures, genders, geographic locations, histories, immigration statuses, languages, national and ethnic identities, racializations, religions, sexualities, socio-economic classes.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for social justice and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Social Justice (3 units; may be an overlay)

After completion of a course designated as fulfilling the Social Justice requirement, students will be able to:

 

  1. analyze, articulate, and apply principles of social justice in addressing social constructions of identity, hierarchy, power, and privilege; and

 

  1. identify ways in which they can contribute to social justice within local communities, nations, or the world.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Social Justice

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for social justice. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Social Justice

4. Ethical Engagement

1, 2

 

 

Appendix G

 

Course Expectations, Student Learning Outcomes, and Links to Goals for Upper-Division General Education

 

All students must complete a total of nine units with one course in each of the following CSU- mandated groupings of domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) Upper Division Physical and/or Life Sciences (Area UD – B), (2) Upper Division Arts and/or Humanities (Area UD – C), and (3) Upper Division Social Sciences (Area UD – D). These subject designations come from Executive Order 1033, “CSU General Education Breadth Requirements,” which governs general education requirements in the California State University system. We interpret the subject area distinctions of EO 1033 as domains of knowledge with distinct methods of inquiry rather than categories that can be defined by college, department, or program designations. Courses that meet the student learning outcomes identified for an area will be approved for that area, regardless of the disciplinary designation of the unit originating the proposal.

 

There are three options for students to complete the Upper Division General Education Requirement: Integrated Studies, Study Abroad, and Disciplinary Perspectives. Details about each of these options appear in the section below titled “Three Options for Completing Upper Division General Education,” but immediately following is a list of course expectations and student learning outcomes, which pertain to all three options.

 

I. Upper Division Physical and/or Life Science (Area UD – B)

 

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the upper-division physical and/or life science (UD – B) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be open to all students, regardless of major, who meet the prerequisites. Students shall not be held to prerequisites that are not specified in the current online University Bulletin. Prerequisites must not unduly restrict access and are restricted to upper division standing or one of the following:
  • lower division general education course(s);
  • other upper division general education courses when the courses are sequenced;
  • individual course placement tests;
  • generic course prerequisites (e.g., a psychology course, a biology course, a history course and so forth); or
  • equivalents to the above;

 

  1. At least one of the assignments shall involve (a) utilizing a plan for acquiring and recording information employing advanced search strategies to examine a wide variety of potential sources, including library resources; (b) articulating and applying advanced criteria in evaluating information and sources, including distinguishing scholarly/non- scholarly information and primary/secondary sources; (c) properly using and citing the information in assignments; and (d) formulating arguments and/or theories supported by information from multiple sources;

 

  1. The course syllabus must include references to assignments that are described above as part of the course expectations;

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for upper division physical and/or life science and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes;

 

  1. Students will be given an opportunity to explore how scientific knowledge can be applied to their own lives and to ways in which they could contribute purposefully to the well-being of their local communities, their nations, or the people of the world; to social justice; and/or to the sustainability of the natural environment; and

 

  1. Students in the course will develop knowledge of the physical universe and/or its life forms.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Upper Division Physical and/or Life Science (3 units)

After completion of an upper division general education course in physical and/or life sciences, students will be able to:

 

  1. apply scientific methods of inquiry and analysis (such as hypothesis testing, systematic and reproducible observations, and the analysis of measurable data) to the physical universe, including either living or nonliving systems;

 

  1. articulate how scientific theories and practices come to be accepted, contested, changed, or abandoned by the scientific community;

 

  1. evaluate the quality of scientific information and claims on the basis of their source and the methods used to generate the information or claims;

 

  1. construct coherent and sound arguments with support from multiple sources, including library resources and proper citations, to support or contest a scientific theory; and

 

  1. analyze the connection of scientific research, discoveries and applications to personal, social or ethical issues in the modern world.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Upper Division Physical and/or Life

Science

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for upper division physical and/or life science. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Upper Division Physical and/or Life Science

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

3, 4

2. Intellectual Attainments

1, 2

4. Ethical Engagement

5

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

6

 

II. Upper Division Arts and/or Humanities (Area UD – C)

 

Course Expectations for Upper Division Arts and/or Humanities (3 units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the upper-division arts and/or humanities (UD – C) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be open to all students, regardless of major, who meet the prerequisites. Students shall not be held to prerequisites that are not specified in the current online University Bulletin. Prerequisites must not unduly restrict access and are restricted to upper division standing or one of the following:
    • lower division general education course(s);
    • other upper division general education courses when the courses are sequenced;
    • individual course placement tests;
    • generic course prerequisites (e.g., a psychology course, a biology course, a history course and so forth); or
    • equivalents to the above.

 

  1. At least one of the assignments shall involve (a) utilizing a plan for acquiring and recording information employing advanced search strategies to examine a wide variety potential sources, including library resources; (b) articulating and applying advanced criteria in evaluating information and sources, including distinguishing scholarly/non- scholarly information and primary/secondary sources; (c) properly using and citing the information in assignments; and (d) formulating arguments and/or theories supported by information from multiple sources.

 

  1. The course syllabus must include references to assignments that are described above as part of the course expectations.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for upper division arts and humanities and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Upper Division Arts and/or Humanities (3 units)

After completion of an upper division general education course in arts and/or humanities, students will be able to:

 

  1. apply artistic or humanistic methods of inquiry and analysis (including creation, interpretation, and evaluation) to study aesthetic experiences, expressive forms, belief systems, or communicative practices and relate them to the social and cultural contexts in which they are rooted;

 

  1. articulate how theories and practices in the arts and/or humanities come to be accepted, contested, changed, or abandoned by the scholarly or artistic communities;

 

  1. evaluate the quality of information, claims, expressions, and interpretations;

 

  1. construct coherent and sound arguments with support from multiple sources, including library resources and proper citations, that communicate what students have discovered;

 

  1. analyze social issues as well as ethical dilemmas and choices that arise out of artistic or humanistic research, discoveries, and applications; and 6. analyze multiple forms and variations of human diversity found in aesthetic experiences, expressive forms, belief systems, or communicative practices, and apply that knowledge to their own lives and to ways in which they could contribute purposefully to the well- being of their local communities, their nations, and the people of the world; to social justice; and/or to the sustainability of the natural environment.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Upper Division Arts and/or Humanities

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for upper division arts and/or humanities. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Upper Division Arts and/or Humanities

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

3, 4

2. Intellectual Attainments

1, 2

3. Appreciation of Diversity

6

4. Ethical Engagement

5

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

6

 

III. Upper Division Social Sciences (Area UD – D)

 

Course Expectations for Upper Division Social Sciences (3 units)

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as meeting the upper-division social sciences (UD – D) general education requirement,

 

  1. The course must be open to all students, regardless of major, who meet the prerequisites. Students shall not be held to prerequisites that are not specified in the current online University Bulletin. Prerequisites must not unduly restrict access and are restricted to upper division standing or one of the following:
    1. lower division general education course(s);
    2. other upper division general education courses when the courses are sequenced;
    3. individual course placement tests;
    4. generic course prerequisites (e.g., a psychology course, a biology course, a history course and so forth); or
    5. equivalents to the above.

 

  1. At least one of the assignments shall involve (a) utilizing a plan for acquiring and recording information employing advanced search strategies to examine a wide variety of potential sources, including library resources; (b) articulating and applying advanced criteria in evaluating information and sources, including distinguishing scholarly/non- scholarly information and primary/secondary sources; (c) properly using and citing the information in assignments; and (d) formulating arguments and/or theories supported by information from multiple sources.

 

  1. The course syllabus must include references to assignments that are described above as part of the course expectations.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for upper division social science and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Upper Division Social Sciences (3 units)

After completion of an upper division general education course in social sciences, students will be able to:

 

  1. apply the methods of inquiry and analysis characteristic of one or more of the behavioral and social science disciplines to the study of human behavior, institutions, or socio- economic systems as related to the appropriate economic, ethnic, geographic, historical, political, social, or cultural contexts;

 

  1. articulate how theories and practices in one or more of the behavioral and social science disciplines come to be accepted, contested, changed, or abandoned by the scholarly community;

 

  1. evaluate the quality of behavioral and social scientific information and claims on the basis of their sources and the methods used to generate that information;

 

  1. construct coherent and sound arguments with support from multiple sources, including library resources and proper citations, that communicate what students have discovered;

 

  1. analyze economic, political, social, or cultural issues as well as ethical dilemmas and choices that arise out of behavioral or social scientific research, discoveries, and applications; and

 

  1. analyze issues of equity and discrimination related to human behavior or to economic, political, social, or cultural institutions or systems, in the present or in the past, and, as appropriate, apply that knowledge to their own lives and to ways in which they could contribute purposefully to the well-being of their local communities, their nations, and the people of the world; to social justice; and/or to the sustainability of the natural environment.

 

Links between Educational Goals and Outcomes for Upper Division Social Sciences

The student learning outcomes were developed in relationship to the “Educational Goals for the Baccalaureate at San Francisco State University.” The chart below illustrates that relationship for upper division social sciences. The numbers correspond to the way the educational goals and student learning outcomes are numbered above.

 

Educational Goals

Student Learning Outcomes for Upper Division Social Sciences

1. Competencies for Lifelong Intellectual Endeavor

3, 4

2. Intellectual Attainments

1, 2

3. Appreciation of Diversity

6

4. Ethical Engagement

5

5. Integration and Application of Knowledge

6

 

IV. Three Options for Completing Upper Division General Education

 

All students must complete a total of nine units with one course in each of the following CSU-mandated groupings of domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences. There are three options for students to complete the Upper Division General Education Requirement: UDGE Disciplinary Perspectives, Integrated Studies, and Study Abroad.

 

V. Upper Division GE Disciplinary Perspectives (9 units minimum; must be taken in residence at San Francisco State University)

 

Students who complete the upper division general education requirement through the Disciplinary Perspectives Option must complete one course in each of the following groupings of domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences. Faculty teaching an upper division general education course from one of these domains (e.g. sciences, arts, humanities, or social sciences), are encouraged to draw connections to the others as appropriate. Each course will be designed to meet six student learning outcomes for the designated domain of knowledge and inquiry. A course may not be in more than one domain of knowledge.

 

VI. Integrated Studies Option (9 units minimum; must be taken in residence at San Francisco State University)

 

Integrative Course Expectations Students must complete three courses that have been devised by a faculty team into a coherent, integrative program of study; one course in each of the following groupings of domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences. In order to receive credit for the Upper Division General Education Requirement through the Integrated Studies Option, students must complete a minimum of 9 units on the same theme. (Courses must also meet the course expectations for upper division general education courses indicated earlier. Though the courses must be open to students from any major, the courses can be restricted to cohorts of students taking a particular set of integrated courses.) Student Learning Outcomes After successfully completing the integrated studies upper division general education program, students will be able to:

  • make connections among different types of knowledge and modes of inquiry across academic disciplines and among domains of knowledge and inquiry; and
  • meet the student learning outcomes for upper division general education courses in the following domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences.

 

AU 401: Integrated Studies: Physical and/or Life Sciences (3-4 units; see note below)

Description: Physical and/or life science investigation of a selected topic that is integrated with study of an allied subject in the arts and/or humanities and the social sciences.

 

AU 402: Integrated Studies: Arts and/or Humanities (3-4 units; see note below)

Description: Artistic and/or humanistic investigation of a selected topic that is integrated with study of an allied subject in the physical and/or life sciences and the social sciences.

 

AU 403: Integrated Studies: Social Sciences (3-4 units; see note below)

Description: Social scientific investigation of a selected topic that is integrated with study of an allied subject in the physical and/or life sciences and the arts and/or humanities.

 

Note on the units requirement for AU 401, 402, and 402

The units of integrated studies may be more closely integrated or more interdisciplinary than is suggested by the three separate courses listed above, but the course of study should adhere to the spirit of providing the equivalent of at least three units in each of the following groupings of domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences. The titles listed here are generic ones for thematically linked courses. The actual courses would have specific titles that correspond to the theme. Faculty teams would be responsible for developing courses that meet the student learning outcomes. Ordinarily, students should be able to complete the integrated studies option in three or fewer semesters. Faculty proposing integrated studies options must provide contingency plans for how students can complete the upper division general education requirement, if some unforeseen circumstance makes it impossible for them to complete an integrated studies program they have started. In the initial certification phase, the Initial Certification Committee will evaluate proposals for a set of integrated courses. After the initial phase, the Upper Division Certification Committee will conduct this evaluation (the process for review is described in the section titled, “Process for Approving Courses to Fulfill University-Wide Requirements”).

 

VII. Study Abroad Option

(9 units minimum; must be taken in residence at either a CSU-approved Study Abroad institution or at San Francisco State University)

 

Study Abroad Course Expectations

Students must complete a minimum of three courses, which total at least nine semester units, with a minimum of five units taken in another nation in a CSU-approved Study Abroad program. Courses used to meet the upper division general education requirements through Study Abroad must be approved by a faculty advisor assigned by the Office of International Programs before a student leaves San Francisco State University. The three courses must be selected in the three CSU-mandated domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences. One to three of the courses may be completed abroad, with any remaining course(s) being completed at San Francisco State University, if necessary to equal at least nine units.

 

For the study abroad program for upper division general education, courses should focus on the host nation [e.g., a course on the geology, flora and fauna, environment, or scientific research of that nation (science), a course on the arts and/or literatures of that nation (arts and humanities), or a course on the histories, geographies, economies, or politics of that nation (social science)]. San Francisco State University courses, taught on campus or elsewhere, should focus on the other nation, region, or continent where students have studied, and address relationships between that area and the United States, and/or on descendants from that area who are now in the United States (e.g., a San Francisco State University course in Asian American Studies on the experience of Chinese Americans as a complement to courses taken about China.).

 

Student Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing the study abroad upper division general education program, students will be able to:

  • make connections across academic disciplines and among domains of knowledge and inquiry as they relate to the host nation where the student studied, on relationships between that nation and the United States, and/or on descendants from that nation who are now in the United States; and
  • meet the student learning outcomes for upper division general education courses in the following domains of knowledge and inquiry: (1) physical and/or life sciences, (2) arts and/or humanities, and (3) social sciences.

 

VIII. Upper Division American Institutions

 

The following Course Expectations and Student Learning Outcomes will be used to approve and assess upper division courses fulfilling the American Institutions (AI) requirement. The Area D sub-committee of the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee (BRC) or the Lower Division Certification Committee (LDCC) will use this document to approve courses for use in meeting the AI requirement. Courses meeting the AI requirement may be in upper division GE, the major, minor or an elective.

 

Course Expectations for Upper Division American Institutions

To be certified by the Baccalaureate Requirements Committee as an upper-division course that meets the Graduation Requirements in United States History, Constitution and American Ideals (as stipulated in CSU EO 1061):

 

  1. The course must be upper division and open to all students. Courses in American Institutions should meet one or more of the following requirements: U.S. History, U.S. Constitution, and/or California Government.

 

  1. As mandated by CSU Executive Order 1061, the U.S. History component of the American Institutions requirement may be met either by examination (AP, CLEP, or SF State competency exam) or by taking a course meeting the following content requirements and their corresponding student learning outcomes. All courses approved for the US History requirement must cover:
    • Significant events over a minimum time span of approximately one hundred years and occurring in the entire area now included in the United States of America, including the relationships of regions within the area and with external regions and powers as appropriate to the understanding of those events within the United States during the period under study.
    • The role of major ethnic and social groups in such events and the contexts in which the events have occurred.
    • The events presented within a framework that illustrates the continuity of the American experience and its derivation from other cultures, including consideration of three or more of the following: politics, economics, social movements, and geography.

 

  1. As mandated by CSU Executive Order 1061, the U.S. and California Government component of the American Institutions requirement may be met either by examination (AP, CLEP, or SF State competency exam) or by taking a course meeting the following content requirements and their corresponding student learning outcomes. All courses approved for the U.S. and California Government requirement must cover:
    • The political philosophies of the framers of the Constitution and the nature and operation of United States political institutions and processes under that Constitution as amended and interpreted.
    • The rights and obligations of citizens in the political system established under the Constitution.
    • The Constitution of the state of California within the framework of evolution of federal-state relations and the nature and processes of state and local government under the Constitution.
    • Contemporary relationships of state and local government with the federal government, the resolution of conflicts and the establishment of cooperative processes under the constitutions of both the state and nation, and the political processes involved.

 

  1. The course syllabus must list the university-approved student learning outcomes for the U.S. History or U.S. and California Government component and link them to activities and/or assignments that students complete to demonstrate they have met the outcomes.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Upper Division American Institutions

Courses in American Institutions should meet one or more of the following requirements: U.S. History, U.S. Constitution, and California Government.

 

After completion of a course in upper division U.S. History to meet the American Institutions requirement, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the significant events of an approximately one hundred year time-span, and occurring in the entire United States, including relationships of regions within that area as well as with external regions and powers as appropriate to the understanding of those events within the US during the period under study;
  • explain the role of major ethnic and social groups in the significant events during the one hundred year time span, and the contexts in which the events occurred; and
  • analyze the significant events within a framework that illustrates the continuity of the American experience and its derivation from other cultures, including consideration of three of more of the following: politics, economics, social movements, and geography.

 

After completion of a course in upper division U.S. Constitution and California Government to meet the American Institutions requirement, students will be able to:

  • explain the political philosophies of the framers of the Constitution and the nature and operation of U.S. political institutions and processes under that Constitution as amended and interpreted;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the rights and obligations of citizens in the political system established under the Constitution;
  • interpret the Constitution of the state of California within the framework of the evolution of federal-state relations and the nature and processes of state and local government under that Constitution; and
  • compare and contrast contemporary relationships of state and local government with the federal government, the resolution of conflicts and the establishment of cooperative processes under the constitutions of both the state and nation, and the political processes involved.

 

After completion of a course in upper division California Government to meet the American Institutions requirement, students will be able to:

  • interpret the Constitution of the state of California within the framework of the evolution of federal-state relations and the nature and processes of state and local government under that Constitution; and
  • compare and contrast contemporary relationships of state and local government with the federal government, the resolution of conflicts and the establishment of cooperative processes under the constitutions of both the state and nation, and the political processes involved.

 

 

Appendix H

 

Complementary Studies Requirement

 

Because the Bachelor of Science and the Bachelor of Music degrees are meant to be more specialized degrees with higher units required in the major (~60), units beyond university-wide requirements (48 units) and those in the major should be reserved for elective units (~12) selected by the student.

 

On the other hand, because the Bachelor of Arts degree should represent a broad liberal arts education, with fewer units required in the major, and because students in these majors are likely to change careers and to have multiple interests, Bachelor of Arts students must complete at least twelve units of complementary studies outside of the primary prefix for the major. Completion of university-wide requirements (48 units), the major (~45), and the complementary studies requirement (12) should still leave BA students with at least as many or more units for electives (~15) as BS or BM students. Unlimited double counting among requirements will also yield additional elective units for BS, BM, and BA students.

 

Complementary studies units may come from languages other than English, minors, certificates, or a coherent group of courses approved by a major advisor as complementary to the major. With the approval of an advisor in the major, courses which fulfill complementary studies units may be lower or upper division units, resident or transfer units, or units taken in approved study abroad programs. BA programs may decide how many, if any, of the complementary units may be counted in the major, and they may designate specific courses to be taken for complementary studies credit or they may develop advising protocols to guide students through this process. Students who complete two majors or a major and a minor automatically complete the complementary studies requirement.

 

The Complementary Studies Requirement contributes to many campus goals, including the CUSP Goal of increasing the number of graduates who are able to communicate in more than one language and Educational Goal #5: “Integration and Application of Knowledge: Graduates will know how to make connections among apparently disparate forms of knowledge and modes of inquiry across academic disciplines and between the principal domains of knowledge and their majors.”

 

Five Examples of Different Ways to Fulfill Complementary Studies

Below are five examples to illustrate various ways the Complementary Studies Requirement could be fulfilled (these hypothetical examples are not meant to pre-empt different choices that the programs listed below may make for themselves in fulfilling the Complementary Studies Requirement).

 

Complementary Studies Requirement in Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology

Students completing a Bachelors of Arts in Anthropology must complete at least twelve units in complementary studies with a prefix other than ANTH. These units may be in one or more languages other than English, a minor, a certificate, or a coherent group of courses approved by a major advisor as complementary to the major. All complementary studies units must be approved by an advisor in the major and all of the units must be separate from units counted in the major. With the approval of an advisor in the major, courses which fulfill complementary studies units may be lower or upper division units, resident or transfer units, or units taken in approved study abroad programs.

 

Complementary Studies Requirement in Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry

Students completing a Bachelors of Arts in Chemistry must complete sixteen units in designated courses in math and physics. The completion of these sixteen units fulfills the complementary studies requirement in the BA in Chemistry and these units are counted in the major.

 

Complementary Studies Requirement in Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies

Students completing a Bachelors of Arts in Communication Studies must complete at least twelve units in complementary studies with a prefix other than COMM. These units may be in one or more languages other than English, a minor, a certificate, or a coherent group of courses approved by a major advisor as complementary to the major. If approved by an advisor in the major, up to eight units of complementary studies may also be counted toward meeting major requirements and such courses may be lower or upper division, resident or transfer, or taken in approved study abroad programs.

 

Complementary Studies Requirement in Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies

The Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies requires sixteen units of course work with an ENVS prefix and another forty or more units from designated lists of courses from a variety of departments. All of the courses selected from the designated lists with prefixes other than ENVS fulfill both the major and the Complementary Studies Requirement.

 

Complementary Studies Requirement in Bachelor of Arts in Journalism

Students completing the Bachelor of Arts in Journalism must complete a minor that has been approved by the department. The minor fulfills the Complementary Studies Requirement.

 

Major programs submit their descriptions of complementary studies for their majors for review and approval by the Curriculum Review and Approval Committee. These descriptions will also be evaluated as part of the program review process as programs come up for review.

 

Appendix I

 

Sample Student Learning Outcomes for Technology in the Major

 

Every major is required to include somewhere in its curriculum appropriate instruction in the technologies most relevant to that major. Below are some examples of student learning outcomes related to technology in the major. These examples are only meant to be illustrations of what such outcomes might look like. Programs can embrace or revise these, or they can develop completely different ones.

Upon completing the major, students will

  • access, critically evaluate, integrate/synthesize and disseminate digital information using current tools and technologies;
  • engage in electronic collaboration;
  • use and create structured electronic documents;
  • make technology-enhanced presentations;
  • use appropriate electronic tools for research and evaluation; and/or
  • describe major legal, ethical, and security issues in information technology.

 

***Originally approved by the Academic Senate at its meeting on April 12, 2012 ***

Endorsed by President Corrigan on November 17, 2011

Baccalaureate Degree Requirements page 50 S-15-255